Wordsworth Road, SE1

Road in/near Bermondsey .

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(51.49044 -0.07516, 51.49 -0.075) 
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Road · Bermondsey · SE1 ·
July
6
2019
A street within the SE1 postcode





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

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DavidA   
Added: 11 Aug 2023 13:03 GMT   

Grange Court, SE5
A conveyance from The British Land Company to (sisters?) Emma and Mary Anne Crawley ... presumably the first development on this site.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

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Comment
Christine D Elliott   
Added: 12 Jun 2023 09:33 GMT   

Blockhouse Street
I grew up at 89 Blockhouse Street with my parents, sister, grandparents & aunt. We had enough rooms but there was no bathroom, we had to go to the public bath every Friday evening (more hot in number 5 please) & the toilet was outside. There was an endless stream of family coming & going & I remember it as a very happy time. I attended Ilderton Road Primary school & then Collingwood School for girls in Leo street behind the Regal cinema. We were all re-housed in 1966 for re-development. I am always grateful for the happy childhood that I had growing up in this area.

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DavidA   
Added: 11 Aug 2023 11:31 GMT   

Grange Court, SE5
A 1960s redevelopment of the spacious 101 Talfourd Road (there doesn’t seem to have been a 103 in spite of title deeds)

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fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

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Lived here
KJ   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 12:34 GMT   

Family
1900’s Cranmer family lived here at 105 (changed to 185 when road was re-numbered)
James Cranmer wife Louisa ( b.Logan)
They had 3 children one being my grandparent William (Bill) CRANMER married to grandmother “Nancy” He used to go to
Glengall Tavern in Bird in Bush Rd ,now been converted to flats.

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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Comment
Added: 6 Jul 2021 05:38 GMT   

Wren Road in the 1950s and 60s
Living in Grove Lane I knew Wren Road; my grandfather’s bank, Lloyds, was on the corner; the Scout District had their office in the Congregational Church and the entrance to the back of the Police station with the stables and horses was off it. Now very changed - smile.

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Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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Jonathan Cocking   
Added: 30 Aug 2022 13:38 GMT   

Tower Bridge, SE1
The driver subsequently married his clippie (conductress).

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DavidA   
Added: 11 Aug 2023 11:27 GMT   

Grange Court, SE5
Actually SE15 (SE15 5PB) as marker is across the road.

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DavidA   
Added: 11 Aug 2023 11:34 GMT   

Grange Court, SE5
Proud of being in Peckham....

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DavidA   
Added: 11 Aug 2023 13:59 GMT   

The British Land Co.
...was set up in 1858 by the National Building Society to own land and split it into plots so the new freeholder could get a vote in elections. So it seems some individual houses were built like in 1869 and maybe the terraces came a bit later, with mortgages from the building society. Maybe the road names were already there ... after judges Sir Thomas Talfourd, Lord Denman and Lord Lyndhurst ... which each got a (former) pub name too

Source: British Land - Wikipedia

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Eileen   
Added: 10 Nov 2023 09:42 GMT   

Brecknock Road Pleating Company
My great grandparents ran the Brecknock Road pleating Company around 1910 to 1920 and my Grandmother worked there as a pleater until she was 16. I should like to know more about this. I know they had a beautiful Victorian house in Islington as I have photos of it & of them in their garden.

Source: Family history

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2023 16:59 GMT   

061123
Why do Thames Water not collect the 15 . Three meter lengths of blue plastic fencing, and old pipes etc. They left here for the last TWO Years, these cause an obstruction,as they halfway lying in the road,as no footpath down this road, and the cars going and exiting the park are getting damaged, also the public are in Grave Danger when trying to avoid your rubbish and the danger of your fences.

Source: Squirrels Lane. Buckhurst Hill, Essex. IG9. I want some action ,now, not Excuses.MK.

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Christian   
Added: 31 Oct 2023 10:34 GMT   

Cornwall Road, W11
Photo shows William Richard Hoare’s chemist shop at 121 Cornwall Road.

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Vik   
Added: 30 Oct 2023 18:48 GMT   

Old pub sign from the Rising Sun
Hi I have no connection to the area except that for the last 30+ years we’ve had an old pub sign hanging on our kitchen wall from the Rising Sun, Stanwell, which I believe was / is on the Oaks Rd. Happy to upload a photo if anyone can tell me how or where to do that!

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Comment
Phillip Martin   
Added: 16 Oct 2023 06:25 GMT   

16 Ashburnham Road
On 15 October 1874 George Frederick Martin was born in 16 Ashburnham Road Greenwich to George Henry Martin, a painter, and Mary Martin, formerly Southern.

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Lived here
Christine Bithrey   
Added: 15 Oct 2023 15:20 GMT   

The Hollies (1860 - 1900)
I lived in Holly Park Estate from 1969 I was 8 years old when we moved in until I left to get married, my mother still lives there now 84. I am wondering if there was ever a cemetery within The Hollies? And if so where? Was it near to the Blythwood Road end or much nearer to the old Methodist Church which is still standing although rather old looking. We spent most of our childhood playing along the old dis-used railway that run directly along Blythwood Road and opposite Holly Park Estate - top end which is where we live/ed. We now walk my mothers dog there twice a day. An elderly gentleman once told me when I was a child that there used to be a cemetery but I am not sure if he was trying to scare us children! I only thought about this recently when walking past the old Methodist Church and seeing the flag stone in the side of the wall with the inscription of when it was built late 1880

If anyone has any answers please email me [email protected]

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Comment
Chris hutchison   
Added: 15 Oct 2023 03:04 GMT   

35 broadhurst gardens.
35 Broadhurst gardens was owned by famous opera singer Mr Herman “Simmy”Simberg. He had transformed it into a film and recording complex.
There was a film and animation studio on the ground floor. The recording facilities were on the next two floors.
I arrived in London from Australia in 1966 and worked in the studio as the tea boy and trainee recording engineer from Christmas 1966 for one year. The facility was leased by an American advertising company called Moreno Films. Mr Simbergs company Vox Humana used the studio for their own projects as well. I worked for both of them. I was so lucky. The manager was another wonderful gentleman called Jack Price who went on to create numerous songs for many famous singers of the day and also assisted the careers of Bob Marley and Jimmy Cliff. “Simmy” let me live in the bedsit,upper right hand window. Jack was also busy with projects with The Troggs,Bill Wyman,Peter Frampton. We did some great sessions with Manfred Mann and Alan Price. The Cream did some demos but that was before my time. We did lots of voice over work. Warren Mitchell and Ronnie Corbett were favourites. I went back in 1978 and “Simmy “ had removed all of the studio and it was now his home. His lounge room was still our studio in my minds eye!!


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Comment
Sue L   
Added: 13 Oct 2023 17:21 GMT   

Duffield Street, Battersea
I’ve been looking for ages for a photo of Duffield Street without any luck.
My mother and grandfather lived there during the war. It was the first property he was able to buy but sadly after only a few months they were bombed out. My mother told the story that one night they were aware of a train stopping above them in the embankment. It was full of soldiers who threw out cigarettes and sweets at about four in the morning. They were returning from Dunkirk though of course my mother had no idea at the time. I have heard the same story from a different source too.

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NEARBY STREETS
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Ivychurch Lane, SE17 A street within the SE17 postcode
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NEARBY PUBS
Dun Cow The Dun Cow stood at 279 Old Kent Road.


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Bermondsey

The name Bermondsey first appears in a letter from Pope Constantine during the 8th century.

Pope Constantine (708-715), in a letter, granted privileges to a monastery at Vermundesei, then in the hands of the abbot of Medeshamstede (as Peterborough was known at the time).

Though Bermondsey’s name may derive from Beornmund’s island (whoever the Anglo-Saxon Beornmund was, is another matter), but Bermondsey is likely to have been a higher, drier spot in an otherwise marshy area, rather than a real island.

Bermondsey appears in the Domesday Book and it was then held by King William (the Conqueror). A small part of the area was in the hands of Robert, Count of Mortain - William’s half brother.

Bermondsey Abbey was founded in 1082 as a Cluniac priory, with St Saviour as the patron.

The monks from the abbey began to develop the area, cultivating land and embanking the river. They put a dock at the mouth of River Neckinger, an adjacent tidal inlet. Records show this was called St Savior’s Dock, after their abbey.

Also owning land here was the Knights Templar. They gave a names to one of the most distinctive streets in London - Shad Thames, a later corruption of ’St John at Thames’.

Other ecclesiastical properties stood nearby. The name ’Tooley Street’ was another corruption - this time of St Olave’s’ Street. It was located in the Archbishop of Canterbury’s manor of Southwark. In Tooley Street, wealthy citizens and clerics built houses.

After the Great Fire of London, Bermondsey started to be settled by the well-to-do. It took on the character of a garden suburb - especially along Grange Road.

A pleasure garden - the Cherry Garden - was founded in the area in the 17th century near to the current Cherry Garden Pier. In 1664, Samuel Pepys visited ’Jamaica House’ in the gardens and wrote in his diary that he had left it "singing finely". Later, from the garden, J.M.W. Turner painted The Fighting Temeraire Tugged to her Last Berth to be Broken Up (1839), showing the veteran warship being towed to Rotherhithe to be scrapped.

The church of St Mary Magdalen in Bermondsey Street was completed in 1690, although a church has been recorded on the site since the 13th century. This church survived both 19th-century redevelopment and the Blitz unscathed. It is an unusual survivor of this period in Bermondsey and in Inner London in general.

In the 18th century, the discovery of a spring from the River Neckinger in the area led to Bermondsey becoming a spa resort - then all the rage. The name Spa Road commemorates this - situated between Grange Road and Jamaica Road.

Bermondsey’s fortunes took a huge nosedive as the Industrial Revolution took hold. Certain industries were deemed too inconvenient to be carried on within the small area of the City of London and banished east - both north and south of the river. One such that came to dominate central Bermondsey was the processing of leather and hides.

Parts of Bermondsey, especially along the riverside, become a notorious slum. The area around St Saviour’s Dock and Shad Thames - known as Jacob’s Island - was one of the worst in London. In Charles Dickens’s novel Oliver Twist, the principal villain Bill Sikes meets a nasty end in the mud of ’Folly Ditch’ an area which was known as Hickmans Folly — the scene of an attack by Spring Heeled Jack in 1845 — surrounding Jacob’s Island. Dickens provides a vivid description of what it was like:

<CITE>... crazy wooden galleries common to the backs of half a dozen houses, with holes from which to look upon the slime beneath; windows, broken and patched, with poles thrust out, on which to dry the linen that is never there; rooms so small, so filthy, so confined, that the air would seem to be too tainted even for the dirt and squalor which they shelter; wooden chambers thrusting themselves out above the mud and threatening to fall into it — as some have done; dirt-besmeared walls and decaying foundations, every repulsive lineament of poverty, every loathsome indication of filth, rot, and garbage: all these ornament the banks of Jacob’s Island.</CITE>

In 1836, London’s first passenger railway terminus was built by the London & Greenwich Railway at London Bridge. The first section of the line to be used was between the Spa Road Station and Deptford High Street. But Spa Road station closed in 1915.

The area was extensively redeveloped during the 19th century and early 20th century with both the expansion of the river trade and the connectivity that the railway brought about. Bermondsey Town Hall - a mark of its civic emergence - was built on Spa Road in 1881. To the east of Tower Bridge, Bermondsey’s three and a half miles of riverside were lined with warehouses and wharves, of which the best known is Butler’s Wharf.

Many buildings from this era survive (around Leathermarket Street) including the huge Leather, Hide and Wool Exchange (now residential and small work spaces). Hepburn and Gale’s tannery, though now disused, on Long Lane is also a substantial survivor of the leather trade.

Peek, Frean and Company was established in 1857 at Dockhead by James Peek and George Hender Frean. They moved to a larger plant in Clements Road in 1866, leading to the nickname ’Biscuit Town’ for Bermondsey. They continued baking here until the brand was discontinued in 1989.

Wee Willie Harris - usually credited as the first British rock and roller - came from Bermondsey. He also worked in Peak Freans before his fame.

Bermondsey’s riverside suffered severe damage in Second World War bombing. A couple of decades later, the wharves became redundant following the collapse of the river trade. After standing derelict, many of the wharves were redeveloped by the London Docklands Development Corporation during the 1980s. They have now been converted into a mixture of residential and commercial accommodations and have become some of the most upmarket and expensive properties in London.

In 1910, Millwall F.C. had moved to a new stadium on Coldblow Lane, having previously played in Millwall on the Isle of Dogs. They kept their original name despite playing on the opposite side of the River Thames to the Millwall area. They played at The Den until 1993, when they relocated to the New Den nearby. The New Den is now back to being called The Den.

In 2000, Bermondsey tube station on the Jubilee Line Extension opened.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Wild’s Rents, SE1 (1930s)
TUM image id: 1644256555
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Block on the Aylwin Estate
Credit: Wiki Commons
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Enid Street, SE16 looking from Rouel Road (1938) The houses had railway arches just outside their back doors. The original Lion pub can just be seen on the right corner and at the far end on the same side was The Windsor Castle. Both pubs survived the pre and post war slum clearance of the houses by Bermondsey Borough Council. The Lion was replaced in 1961 on the corner of Spa Road but The Windsor was demolished c.1965 and never rebuilt. The same view nowadays would include high modern flats to the left.
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Old Jamaica Road, SE16 (2012) Part of the Bermondsey Spa development, the curved building in this view includes a health centre. Bermondsey Spa is a major housing development in the area between the London-Greenwich Railway line and Jamaica Road, in the early years of the 21st century. The terraced housing that occupied most of the site was cleared by the 1950s.
Credit: Geograph/Stephen Craven
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Spa Road station (c.1900) Spa Road station was one of the first of London’s railway stations, built by the London & Greenwich Railway (later the South Eastern and Chatham railway) in 1836
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Trafalgar Avenue (then Road) in 1925. The bridge on the left went over the Grand Surrey Canal and the Victory pub was on the corner of Trafalgar Avenue and Waite Street.
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Pearce & Duff blancmange factory After starting out as a cottage industry, the blancmange manufacturers Pearce & Duff moved to Rouel Road; SE16 in 1890, to the site of a glue factory - Young & Co. The Pearce & Duff factory closed after a fire in the 1960s.
Credit: Lambeth Archives
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Tommy Steele signing autographs in Frean Street, Bermondsey (1957) He was leaving to do the ’Six Five Special’ on TV.
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Bermondsey Abbey, located around the modern-day Bermondsey Square.
Credit: Sir Walter Besant
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Delivery trailers at Peek Frean’s biscuit factory (1961) The delivery yard at the Bermondsey bakery showing trailers and British Railways vans and tractor units taking the famous biscuits off to be distributed by train. The building proudly proclaims the years in existence - 1857 to 1961 at that point.
Credit: Peek Frean
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The Dun Cow at 279 Old Kent Road.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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