Walburgh Street, E1

An area which may have existed since the nineteenth century or before with most of the buildings dating from the 2000s

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Road · Shadwell · E1 ·
July
16
2019

A street within the E1 postcode





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Tricia   
Added: 27 Apr 2021 12:05 GMT   

St George in the East Church
This Church was opened in 1729, designed by Hawksmore. Inside destroyed by incendrie bomb 16th April 1941. Rebuilt inside and finished in 1964. The building remained open most of the time in a temporary prefab.

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Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

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Born here
Beverly Sand   
Added: 3 Apr 2021 17:19 GMT   

Havering Street, E1
My mother was born at 48 Havering Street. That house no longer exists. It disappeared from the map by 1950. Family name Schneider, mother Ray and father Joe. Joe’s parents lived just up the road at 311 Cable Street

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Comment
Boo Horton    
Added: 31 May 2021 13:39 GMT   

Angel & Trumpet, Stepney Green
The Angel & Trumpet Public House in Stepney Green was run by my ancestors in the 1930’s. Unfortunately, it was a victim on WWII and was badly damaged and subsequently demolished. I have one photograph that I believe to bethe pub, but it doesn’t show much more that my Great Aunt cleaning the steps.

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

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fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

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Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

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Lived here
Linda    
Added: 18 Feb 2021 22:03 GMT   

Pereira Street, E1
My grandfather Charles Suett lived in Periera Street & married a widowed neighbour there. They later moved to 33 Bullen House, Collingwood Street where my father was born.

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Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

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Jonathan Cocking   
Added: 30 Aug 2022 13:38 GMT   

Tower Bridge, SE1
The driver subsequently married his clippie (conductress).

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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danny currie   
Added: 30 Nov 2022 18:39 GMT   

dads yard
ron currie had a car breaking yard in millers yard back in the 60s good old days

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Lynette beardwood   
Added: 29 Nov 2022 20:53 GMT   

Spy’s Club
Topham’s Hotel at 24-28 Ebury Street was called the Ebury Court Hotel. Its first proprietor was a Mrs Topham. In WW2 it was a favourite watering hole for the various intelligence organisations based in the Pimlico area. The first woman infiltrated into France in 1942, FANY Yvonne Rudellat, was recruited by the Special Operations Executive while working there. She died in Bergen Belsen in April 1945.

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Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:39 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

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Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:38 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

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Lived here
Phil Stubbington   
Added: 14 Nov 2022 16:28 GMT   

Numbers 60 to 70 (1901 - 1939)
A builder, Robert Maeers (1842-1919), applied to build six houses on plots 134 to 139 on the Lincoln House Estate on 5 October 1901. He received approval on 8 October 1901. These would become numbers 60 to 70 Rodenhurst Road (60 is plot 139). Robert Maeers was born in Northleigh, Devon. In 1901 he was living in 118 Elms Road with his wife Georgina, nee Bagwell. They had four children, Allan, Edwin, Alice, and Harriet, born between 1863 and 1873.
Alice Maeers was married to John Rawlins. Harriet Maeers was married to William Street.
Three of the six houses first appear on the electoral register in 1904:
Daniel Mescal “Ferncroft”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By the 1905 electoral register all six are occupied:

Daniel Mescal “St Senans”
Henry Robert Honeywood “Grasmere”
John Rawlins “Iveydene”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Walter Ernest Manning “St Hilda”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By 1906 house numbers replace names:

Daniel Mescal 70
Henry Robert Honeywood 68
John Rawlins 66
William Francis Street 64
Walter Ernest Manning 62
Henry Elkin 60

It’s not clear whether number 70 changed from “Ferncroft” to “St Senans” or possibly Daniel Mescal moved houses.

In any event, it can be seen that Robert Maeers’ two daughters are living in numbers 64 and 66, with, according to local information, an interconnecting door. In the 1911 census William Street is shown as a banker’s clerk. John Rawlins is a chartering clerk in shipping. Robert Maeers and his wife are also living at this address, Robert being shown as a retired builder.

By 1939 all the houses are in different ownership except number 60, where the Elkins are still in residence.


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stephen garraway   
Added: 13 Nov 2022 13:56 GMT   

Martin Street, Latimer Road
I was born at St Charlottes and lived at 14, Martin Street, Latimer Road W10 until I was 4 years old when we moved to the east end. It was my Nan Grant’s House and she was the widow of George Frederick Grant. She had two sons, George and Frederick, and one daughter, my mother Margaret Patricia.
The downstairs flat where we lived had two floors, the basement and the ground floor. The upper two floors were rented to a Scot and his family, the Smiths. He had red hair. The lights and cooker were gas and there was one cold tap over a Belfast sink. A tin bath hung on the wall. The toilet was outside in the yard. This was concreted over and faced the the rear of the opposite terraces. All the yards were segregated by high brick walls. The basement had the a "best" room with a large , dark fireplace with two painted metal Alsation ornaments and it was very dark, cold and little used.
The street lights were gas and a man came round twice daily to turn them on and off using a large pole with a hook and a lighted torch on the end. I remember men coming round the streets with carts selling hot chestnuts and muffins and also the hurdy gurdy man with his instrument and a monkey in a red jacket. I also remember the first time I saw a black man and my mother pulling me away from him. He had a Trilby and pale Mackintosh so he must of been one of the first of the Windrush people. I seem to recall he had a thin moustache.
Uncle George had a small delivery lorry but mum lost touch with him and his family. Uncle Fred went to Peabody Buildings near ST.Pauls.
My Nan was moved to a maisonette in White City around 1966, and couldn’t cope with electric lights, cookers and heating and she lost all of her neighbourhood friends. Within six months she had extreme dementia and died in a horrible ward in Tooting Bec hospital a year or so later. An awful way to end her life, being moved out of her lifelong neighbourhood even though it was slums.

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Comment
   
Added: 31 Oct 2022 18:47 GMT   

Memories
I lived at 7 Conder Street in a prefab from roughly 1965 to 1971 approx - happy memories- sad to see it is no more ?

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Eve Glover   
Added: 22 Oct 2022 09:28 GMT   

Shenley Road
Shenley Road is the main street in Borehamwood where the Job Centre and Blue Arrow were located

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Corner of Johns Hill and Pennington Street (1906) The corner of Johns Hill and Pennington Street, Wapping, December 1906.

NEARBY STREETS
Adler Street, E1 Adler Street runs between the Whitechapel Road and the Commercial Road.
Amazon Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Angel Mews, E1W A street within the E1 postcode
Anthony Street, E1 Anthony Street previously ran from Commercial Road through to Cable Street. Just a few metres survive.
Artichoke Hill, E1W Artichoke Hill is a road in the E1W postcode area
Back Church Lane, E1 Back Church Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Batty Street, E1 Batty Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Betts House, E1 Betts House is the oldest block on the St George’s Estate.
Betts Street, E1W Betts Street was formerly a lengthy street in the area.
Bewley Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Bigland Street, E1 Bigland Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Bluegate Field, E1 Bluegate Field was a poetic name used in the 18th century for a section of Cable Street.
Boyard Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Boyd Street, E1 Boyd Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Breezer’s Hill, E98 Breezer’s Hill is a short, narrow hill running between The Highway (formerly Ratcliffe Highway and St George Street) and Pennington Street.
Bridle Mews, E1 Bridle Mews is a location in London.
Bromehead Road, E1 Bromehead Road is a location in London.
Bromehead Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Buross Street, E1 Buross Street runs south off Commercial Road.
Burslem Street, E1 Burslem Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Burwell Close, E1 Burwell Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Cable Street, E1 Cable Street started as a straight path along which hemp ropes were twisted into ships’ cables.
Cannon St Road, E1 Cannon St Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Cannon Street Road, E1 Cannon Street Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Challoner Walk, E1 Challoner Walk is a location in London.
Chapman Street, E1 Chapman Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Chigwell Hill, E1W Chigwell Hill is a road in the E1W postcode area
Christian Street, E1 Christian Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Clark Street, E1 Clark Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Commercial Road, E1 Commercial Road is a major thoroughfare (the A13) running east-west from the junction of Burdett Road and East India Dock Road to Braham Street.
Cornwall Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Crowder Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Damien Street, E1 Damien Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Deancross Street, E1 Deancross Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Dellow Street, E1 Dellow Street was once Blue Gate Fields.
Dock Street, E1 Dock Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Dunch Street, E1 Dunch Street is a street in
East Cross Centre, E1 East Cross Centre is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Education Square, E1 Education Square is a location in London.
Ellen Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Ensign Street, E1 Ensign Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Ensigreen Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Enterprise House, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Fairclough Street, E1 Fairclough Street runs from Back Church Lane to Christian Street.
Fenton Street, E1 Fenton Street runs south from Commercial Road.
Fletcher Street, E1 Fletcher Street runs south off of Cable Street.
Flintlock Close, E1 Flintlock Close is a location in London.
Forbes Street, E1 Forbes Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Fordham Street, E1 Fordham Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Golding Street, E1 Golding Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Gower’s Walk, E1 Gower’s Walk leads south from Commercial Road.
Graces Alley, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Greenfield Road, E1 Greenfield Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Hainton Close, E1 Hainton Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Hawksmoor Mews, E1 Hawksmoor Mews is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Henriques Street, E1 Henriques Street was formerly called Berner Street.
Hessel Street, E1 Hessel Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Hindmarsh Close, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
James Voller Way, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Jane Street, E1 Jane Street is now only a few yards long, with no houses.
Jewel Square, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Juniper Street, E1 Juniper Street is now simply a cul-de-sac
Kinder Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
King Charles Terrace, E1W King Charles Terrace is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
King David Lane, E1 King David Lane connects Cable Street with The Highway.
King Henry Terrace, E1W King Henry Terrace is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Knock Fergus, E1 Knock Fergus was absorbed into Cable Street during the 1860s.
Langdale Street, E1 Langdale Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Lowood Street, E1 Lowood Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Martha Street, E1 Martha Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Martineau Square, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Meadowcroft Mews, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Mill Yard, E1 Mill Yard is a road in the E1 postcode area
Mitali Passage, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Montpelier Place, E1 Montpelier Place is a road in the E1 postcode area
Morris Street, E1 Morris Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Morton Close, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Mulberry Court, E1W A street within the E1 postcode
Mulberry Street, E1 Mulberry Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Myrdle Street, E1 Myrdle Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Nelson Street, E1 Nelson Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
New Loom House, E1 Residential block
Newbold Cottages, E1 Newbold Cottages is a road in the E1 postcode area
Newlands Quay, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Pace Place, E1 Pace Place is a road in the E1 postcode area
Parfett Street, E1 Parfett Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Pennington Street, E1W Pennington Street is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Philchurch Place, E1 Philchurch Place is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Philpot Street, E1 Philpot Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Pinchin Street, E1 Pinchin Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Plumbers Row, E1 Plumbers Row is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Ponler Street, E1 Ponler Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Princes Street, E1 Tower Bridge Approach is one of the streets of London in the EC3N postal area.
Prince’s Square, E1W Prince’s Square was part of an eighteenth century Swedish community.
Queen Victoria Terrace, E1W Queen Victoria Terrace is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Railway Arches, E1 Railway Arches is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Rampart Street, E1 Rampart Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Redcastle Close, E1 Redcastle Close arrived with the construction of the Glamis Estate.
Richard Street, E1 Richard Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Rope Walk Gardens, E1 Rope Walk Gardens is a location in London.
Ropewalk Gardens, EC1M Ropewalk Gardens is a location in London.
Rum Close, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Rum Warehouse, E1W Rum Warehouse is a location in London.
Sage Street, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Sander Street, E1 Sander Street ran from Back Church Lane to Berner Street (Henriques Street).
School Mews, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Settles Street, E1 Settles Street links Fieldgate Street with Commercial Road.
Shadwell Gardens, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Shadwell Place, E1 Shadwell Place is a road in the E1 postcode area
Ship Alley, E1W Ship Alley used to lie off Wellclose Square.
Sidney Square, E1 Sidney Square is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Sly Street, E1 Sly Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Solander Gardens, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Sovereign Close, E1W Sovereign Close is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Spencer Way, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
St George Street, E1W Prior to the London County Council renaming programme of 1937, St George Street denoted part of the modern street called The Highway.
Star Street, E1 Star Street was, for a while, Planet Street.
Stutfield Street, E1 Stutfield Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Sutton Street, E1 Sutton Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Swedenborg Gardens, E1 Swedenborg Gardens is a road in the E1 postcode area
Tait Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Tarbert Walk, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Tarling Street, E1 Tarling Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Telfords Yard, E1W Telfords Yard is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
The Highway, E1W The Highway was once the Ratcliffe Highway.
The Highway, E1W The Highway, formerly known as the Ratcliffe Highway and dating dates back to Saxon times, is a road which stretches from Wapping to Shadwell.
The Loom, EC3R The Loom is a location in London.
Tillman Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Timberland Road, E1 Timberland Road is a road in the E1 postcode area
Turning Street, E20 Turning Street is a location in London.
Twine Court, E1 Twine Court is a road in the E1 postcode area
Twyne House 3 Boyd Street, E1 Twyne House 3 Boyd Street is a location in London.
Umberston Street, E1 Umberston Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Varden Street, E1 Varden Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Virginia Street, E1W Virginia Street is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Walden Street, E1 Walden Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Watney Market, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Watney Street, E1 Watney Street is the location for a famed East End street market.
Wellclose Square, E1 Wellclose Square lies between Cable Street to the north and The Highway to the south.
Wellclose Street, E1W Wellclose Street was originally built in the 1680s as Neptune Street.
West Gardens, E1W West Gardens is a road in the E1W postcode area
Wicker Street, E1 Wicker Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Wool House, E1 A street within the E1 postcode

NEARBY PUBS
George Tavern The George Tavern contains original brickwork some 700 years old.


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We now have 523 completed street histories and 46977 partial histories
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Shadwell

Shadwell is a district in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, and located on the north bank of the Thames between Wapping and Ratcliff.

In the 13th century, the area was known as Scadflet and Shatfliet – derived from the Anglo-Saxon fleot, meaning a shallow creek or bay – the land was a low lying marsh, until drained (by order of Act of Parliament, after 1587) by Cornelius Vanderdelf. A spring, issuing from near the south wall of the churchyard was dedicated to St Chad, and filled a nearby well. The origin of the name is therefore confused, being associated with both the earlier use and the later well.

In the 17th century, Thomas Neale became a local landowner, and built a mill and established a waterworks on large ponds, left by the draining of the marsh. The area had been virtually uninhabited and he developed the waterfront, with houses behind as a speculation. Shadwell became a maritime hamlet with roperies, tanneries, breweries, wharves, smiths, and numerous taverns, built around the chapel of St Paul's. Seventy-five sea captains are buried in its churchyard; Captain James Cook had his son baptised there.

By the mid-eighteenth century, Shadwell Spa was established, producing sulphurous waters, in Sun Tavern fields. As well as medicinal purposes, salts were extracted from the waters; and used by local calicoprinters to fix their dyes.

In the 19th century, Shadwell was home to a large community of foreign South Asian lascar seamen, brought over from British India by the East India Company. There were also Anglo-Indians, from intermarriage and cohabitation between lascar seamen and local girls. There were also smaller communities of Chinese and Greek seamen, who also intermarried and cohabited with locals.

The modern area is dominated by the enclosed former dock, Shadwell Basin, whose construction destroyed much of the earlier settlement – by this time degenerated into slums. The basin once formed the eastern entrance to the then London Docks, with a channel leading west to St Katharine Docks. It is actually two dock basins - the south basin was constructed in 1828-32 and the north basin in 1854-8.

Unlike nearby Limehouse Basin, few craft larger than canoes can be seen on Shadwell Basin, which is largely used for fishing and watersports - and as a scenic backdrop to the modern residential developments that line it. The basin, however, is still connected to the Thames and the channel is spanned by a bascule bridge.

The original Shadwell station was one of the oldest on the network, and was built over a spring. First opened by the East London Railway on 10 April 1876, it was first served by the Metropolitan District Railway and Metropolitan Railway on 1 October 1884. It was renamed Shadwell & St. George-in-the-East on 1 July 1900 but reverted to its original name in 1918. In 1983, a new ticket hall was built on Cable Street, replacing the original building in Watney Street.

Shadwell DLR station opened on 31 August 1987 as part of the first tranche of DLR stations. Initially designed for one-car DLR trains, Shadwell's platform underwent extension to two-car operation in 1991. The station underwent further refurbishment in 2009, which extended the platforms to accommodate three-car trains, revamped the station entrance at ground level, and added an emergency exit at the east end of the platforms.

Shadwell station closed on 22 December 2007, reopened on 27 April 2010 for a preview service to New Cross and New Cross Gate, and from 23 May 2010, the latter service extended to West Croydon / Crystal Palace operated within the London Overground network.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Thames Tunnel
TUM image id: 1554042170
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Buxton Street art, Spitalfields
TUM image id: 1653776269
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Buck's Row (Durward Street) in 1938.
TUM image id: 1490922288
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Hanbury Street c.1918, looking east
TUM image id: 1490921501
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
St Mary’s (Whitechapel) station (1916) This existed between 1884 and 1938 between Aldgate East and Whitechapel.
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A view east along Whitechapel Road including the Pavilion Theatre. The Pavilion was the first major theatre to open in the East End. It opened in 1827 and closed in 1935.
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Cable Street, E1 in the early years of the twentieth century
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Berner Street, April 1909. The cartwheel indicates the entrance to Dutfield's Yard.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Settles Street, E1 (1940) This photo shows a fine old school sign which featured a torch. A direction sign to a Second World War shelter is on the wall.
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St George’s Street (now part of The Highway) in 1896
Old London postcard
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The ruins of Ratcliff after the fire of 1794
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Wellclose Square in the Victorian era
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Whitechapel Road
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Entrance to Ship Alley from the southeast corner of Wellclose Square, Stepney (1898) Ship Alley was laid out in 1683 by Nicholas Barbon, a "most roguish builder-financier"
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