Trematon Walk, N1

Road in/near King’s Cross

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(51.53356 -0.12157, 51.533 -0.121) 
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Road · King’s Cross · N1 ·
August
3
2019

A street within the N1C postcode





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 21 Feb 2023 11:39 GMT   

Error on 1800 map numbering for John Street
The 1800 map of Whitfield Street (17 zoom) has an error in the numbering shown on the map. The houses are numbered up the right hand side of John Street and Upper John Street to #47 and then are numbered down the left hand side until #81 BUT then continue from 52-61 instead of 82-91.

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Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Comment
Carol   
Added: 7 May 2021 18:44 GMT   

Nan
My nan lily,her sister Elizabeth and their parents Elizabeth and William lived here in1911

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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Comment
Mike   
Added: 28 Feb 2023 18:09 GMT   

6 Elia Street
When I was young I lived in 6 Elia Street. At the end of the garden there was a garage owned by Initial Laundries which ran from an access in Quick Street all the way up to the back of our garden. The fire exit to the garage was a window leading into our garden. 6 Elia Street was owned by Initial Laundry.

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Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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BG   
Added: 20 Dec 2022 02:58 GMT   

Lancing Street, NW1
LANCING STREET

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Comment
Jack Wilson   
Added: 21 Jun 2022 21:40 GMT   

Penfold Printers
I am seeking the location of Penfold Printers Offices in Dt Albans place - probably about 1870 or so

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Comment
P Cash   
Added: 19 Feb 2023 08:03 GMT   

Occupants of 19-29 Woburn Place
The Industrial Tribunals (later changed to Employment Tribunals) moved (from its former location on Ebury Bridge Road to 19-29 Woburn Place sometime in the late 1980s (I believe).

19-29 Woburn Place had nine floors in total (one in the basement and two in its mansard roof and most of the building was occupied by the Tribunals

The ’Head Office’ of the tribunals, occupied space on the 7th, 6th and 2nd floors, whilst one of the largest of the regional offices (London North but later called London Central) occupied space in the basement, ground and first floor.

The expansive ground floor entrance had white marble flooring and a security desk. Behind (on evey floor) lay a square (& uncluttered) lobby space, which was flanked on either side by lifts. On the rear side was an elegant staircase, with white marble steps, brass inlays and a shiny brass handrail which spiralled around an open well. Both staircase, stairwell and lifts ran the full height of the building. On all floors from 1st upwards, staff toilets were tucked on either side of the staircase (behind the lifts).

Basement Floor - Tribunal hearing rooms, dormant files store and secure basement space for Head Office. Public toilets.

Geound Floor - The ’post’ roon sat next to the entrance in the northern side, the rest of which was occupied by the private offices of the full time Tribunal judiciary. Thw largest office belonged to the Regional Chair and was situated on the far corner (overlooking Tavistock Square) The secretary to the Regional Chair occupied a small office next door.
The south side of this floor was occupied by the large open plan General Office for the administration, a staff kitchen & rest room and the private offices of the Regional Secretary (office manager) and their deputy.

First Dloor - Tribunal hearing rooms; separate public waiting rooms for Applicants & Respondents; two small rooms used by Counsel (on a ’whoever arrives first’ bases) and a small private rest room for use by tribunal lay members.

Second Floor - Tribunal Hearing Rooms; Tribunal Head Office - HR & Estate Depts & other tennants.

Third Floor - other tennants

Fourth Floor - other tennants

Fifth Floor - Other Tennants except for a large non-smoking room for staff, (which overlooked Tavistock Sqaure). It was seldom used, as a result of lacking any facities aside from a meagre collection of unwanted’ tatty seating. Next to it, (overlooking Tavistock Place) was a staff canteen.

Sixth Floor - Other tennants mostly except for a few offices on the northern side occupied by tribunal Head Office - IT Dept.

Seventh Floor - Other tenants in the northern side. The southern (front) side held the private offices of several senior managers (Secretariat, IT & Finance), private office of the Chief Accuntant; an office for two private secretaries and a stationary cupboard. On the rear side was a small kitchen; the private office of the Chief Executive and the private office of the President of the Tribunals for England & Wales. (From 1995 onwards, this became a conference room as the President was based elsewhere. The far end of this side contained an open plan office for Head Office staff - Secretariat, Finance & HR (staff training team) depts.

Eighth Floor - other tennants.


The Employment Tribunals (Regional & Head Offices) relocated to Vitory House, Kingsway in April 2005.






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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Christine D Elliott   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 15:52 GMT   

The Blute Family
My grandparents, Frederick William Blute & Alice Elizabeth Blute nee: Warnham lived at 89 Blockhouse Street Deptford from around 1917.They had six children. 1. Alice Maragret Blute (my mother) 2. Frederick William Blute 3. Charles Adrian Blute 4. Violet Lillian Blute 5. Donald Blute 6. Stanley Vincent Blute (Lived 15 months). I lived there with my family from 1954 (Birth) until 1965 when we were re-housed for regeneration to the area.
I attended Ilderton Road School.
Very happy memories of that time.

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Pearl Foster   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 12:22 GMT   

Dukes Place, EC3A
Until his death in 1767, Daniel Nunes de Lara worked from his home in Dukes Street as a Pastry Cook. It was not until much later the street was renamed Dukes Place. Daniel and his family attended the nearby Bevis Marks synagogue for Sephardic Jews. The Ashkenazi Great Synagogue was established in Duke Street, which meant Daniel’s business perfectly situated for his occupation as it allowed him to cater for both congregations.

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Comment
Dr Paul Flewers   
Added: 9 Mar 2023 18:12 GMT   

Some Brief Notes on Hawthorne Close / Hawthorne Street
My great-grandparents lived in the last house on the south side of Hawthorne Street, no 13, and my grandmother Alice Knopp and her brothers and sisters grew up there. Alice Knopp married Charles Flewers, from nearby Hayling Road, and moved to Richmond, Surrey, where I was born. Leonard Knopp married Esther Gutenberg and lived there until the street was demolished in the mid-1960s, moving on to Tottenham. Uncle Len worked in the fur trade, then ran a pet shop in, I think, the Kingsland Road.

From the back garden, one could see the almshouses in the Balls Pond Road. There was an ink factory at the end of the street, which I recall as rather malodorous.

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KJH   
Added: 7 Mar 2023 17:14 GMT   

Andover Road, N7 (1939 - 1957)
My aunt, Doris nee Curtis (aka Jo) and her husband John Hawkins (aka Jack) ran a small general stores at 92 Andover Road (N7). I have found details in the 1939 register but don’t know how long before that it was opened.He died in 1957. In the 1939 register he is noted as being an ARP warden for Islington warden

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Added: 2 Mar 2023 13:50 GMT   

The Queens Head
Queens Head demolished and a NISA supermarket and flats built in its place.

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Comment
Mike   
Added: 28 Feb 2023 18:09 GMT   

6 Elia Street
When I was young I lived in 6 Elia Street. At the end of the garden there was a garage owned by Initial Laundries which ran from an access in Quick Street all the way up to the back of our garden. The fire exit to the garage was a window leading into our garden. 6 Elia Street was owned by Initial Laundry.

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Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 21 Feb 2023 11:39 GMT   

Error on 1800 map numbering for John Street
The 1800 map of Whitfield Street (17 zoom) has an error in the numbering shown on the map. The houses are numbered up the right hand side of John Street and Upper John Street to #47 and then are numbered down the left hand side until #81 BUT then continue from 52-61 instead of 82-91.

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 30 Jan 2023 11:28 GMT   

The Beatles on a London rooftop
The Beatles’ rooftop concert took place on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London. It was their final public performance as a band and was unannounced, attracting a crowd of onlookers. The concert lasted for 42 minutes and included nine songs. The concert is remembered as a seminal moment in the history of rock music and remains one of the most famous rock performances of all time.

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V:3

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
’Royal Blue’ horse omnibus outside 5 Euston Road The bus carries route information and an advert for Selfridge’s.

NEARBY STREETS
Adrian House, N1 Adrian House is a block on Jays Street.
Affleck Street, N1 Affleck Street was built by a Mr A. Attneave in 1884.
Albion Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Albion Yard, N1 Albion Yard lies off of Balfe Street.
All Saints Street, N1 All Saints Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
ArtHouse, N1C ArtHouse is a block on York Way.
Bagley Walk Arches, N1C Bagley Walk Arches is a location in London.
Bagley Walk, N1C Bagley Walk is a location in London.
Balfe Street, N1 Balfe Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Battlebridge Court, N1 Battlebridge Court is sited on Wharfdale Road.
Birkenhead Street, WC1H Birkenhead Street is a street opposite Kings Cross Station, and adjoining Euston Road.
Blackmore House, N1 Blackmore House is a block on Copenhagen Street.
Boadicea Street, N1 Boadicea Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Bonington House, N1 Bonington House is a block on Killick Street.
Bravingtons Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Bridge Wharf, N1 Bridge Wharf is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Brill Place, NW1 Brill Place is named after the former Brill Row in the area.
Brill Row, NW1 Brill Row was one of many small streets which became the basis for a Somers Town market.
Britannia Street, WC1X Britannia Street, King’s Cross, dates from the 1770s.
Bruce Kenrick House, N1 Bruce Kenrick House is a block on Killick Street.
Bryan Street, N1 The modern line of Bryan Street lies somewhat to the west of the original pre-Second World War line of the street.
Caledonia House, N1 Caledonia House can be found on Pentonville Road.
Caledonia Street, N1 Caledonia Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Caledonian Road, N1 Caledonian Road runs north from King’s Cross.
Calshot House, N1 Calshot House is a building on Priory Green.
Calshot Street, N1 Calshot Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Carnegie Street, N1 Carnegie Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Chill Lane, N1C Chill Lane is a location in London.
Clayton Crescent, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Coach Road, N1C Coach Road is a road in the N1C postcode area
Coal Drops Yard, N1C Coal Drops Yard is a location in London.
Collier Street, N1 Collier Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cooper’s Lane, NW1 Cooper’s Lane is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Copenhagen Street, N1 Copenhagen Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Crestfield Street, WC1H Crestfield Street was previously Chesterfield Street.
Crinan Street, N1 Crinan Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cumming Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Delhi Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Denton Street, N1C Denton Street disappeared under the construction of St Pancras station.
Derby Lodge, WC1X Derby Lodge is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Dinwiddy House, N1 Dinwiddy House is a block on Pentonville Road.
Dunoon House, N1 Dunoon House is a block on Edward Square.
Edward Square, N1 Edward Square is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Elstree Street, N1C Elstree Street once laid off of St Pancras Road.
Euston Road, WC1H The easternmost section of the Euston Road lies in the N1 postcode and runs along the facade of Kings Cross Station.
Everilda Street, N1 Everilda Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Ewen House, N1 Ewen House is a block on Caledonian Road.
Field Street, WC1X Field Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Fife Terrace, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Foxcroft House, N1 Foxcroft House is a block on Pentonville Road.
Frearson House, N1 Frearson House is a block on Weston Rise.
Gatti’s Wharf, N1 Gatti’s Wharf is a road in the N1 postcode area
Goods Way, N1C Goods Way runs from Pancras Road to York Way.
Granary Building, N1C Granary Building is a location in London.
Granary Square, N1C A street within the N1C postcode
Grendon House, N1 Grendon House is located on Collier Street.
Gridiron Building, N1C A street within the N1C postcode
Handyside Street, N1C Handyside Street is a road in the N1C postcode area
Havelock Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Hurst House, N1 Hurst House can be found on Weston Rise.
James Lighthill House, WC1X James Lighthill House is a block on Penton Rise.
Jays Street, N1 Jays Street dates from the 1950s reconfiguration of the area.
Jocelin House, N1 Jocelin House is located on Leirum Street.
Julius Nyerere Close, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Kenwrick House, N1 Kenwrick House is a block on Leirum Street.
Keystone Crescent, N1 Keystone Crescent is a road in the N1 postcode area
Killick Street, N1 Killick Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
King’s Boulevard, N1C King’s Boulevard is a road in the N1C postcode area
King’s Cross Square, N1C King’s Cross Square is a road in the N1C postcode area
Kings Cross Bridge, N1 Kings Cross Bridge is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Kings Cross Square, N1C Kings Cross Square is a location in London.
Kings Cross, N1C A street within the N1C postcode
Kings Quarter Apartments, N1 Kings Quarter Apartments is a block on Copenhagen Street.
Lavina Grove, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Leeke Street, WC1X Leeke Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Leirum Street, N1 The name of Leirum Street is the result of Muriel Street being split in half post-war.
Lewis Cubitt Square, N1C Lewis Cubitt Square is a location in London.
Lighterman House, N1 Lighterman House can be found on Wharfdale Road.
Lighthouse Building, N1 Lighthouse Building is a building on Pentonville Road.
Lorenzo Street, N1 Lorenzo Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Lower Stable Street, N1C Lower Stable Street is a location in London.
Marcello House, N1 Marcello House is a block on Pentonville Road.
Mavor House, N1 Mavor House is a block on Jays Street.
Messiter House, N1 Messiter House is a block on Pultney Street.
Midland Road, N1C Midland Road is a road in the N1C postcode area
Muriel Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
New Wharf Road, N1 New Wharf Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Noahs Yard, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Northam’s Buildings, NW1 Northam’s Buildings was swept away by the building of St Pancras station.
Northdown Street, N1 Northdown Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Omega Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
One Kings Cross, N1C A street within the N1C postcode
One Pancras Square, N1C A street within the N1C postcode
Orkney House, N1 Orkney House is a building on Copenhagen Street.
Ossulston Street, NW1 Ossulston Street is a street in Camden Town.
Pancras Road, N1C Pancras Road is a road in the N1C postcode area
Pancras Road, NW1 Pancras Road is a street in Camden Town.
Pancras Square, N1C This is a street in the N1C postcode area
Penton Rise, WC1X Penton Rise is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Perry Street, N1C Perry Street was buried by St Pancras station.
Plimsoll Building, N1C Plimsoll Building is a block on Wollstonecraft Street.
Pollard House, N1 Pollard House is a block on Northdown Street.
Prince’s Yard, N1 Prince’s Yard is a road in the N1 postcode area
Pultney Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Railway Street, N1 Railway Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Redmond House, N1 Redmond House is a building on Carnegie Street.
Regeneration House, N1C Regeneration House is located on Regent’s Canal Towpath.
Regent’s Canal Towpath, N1 Regent’s Canal Towpath lies along the canal of the same name.
Regent’s Canal Towpath, N1C Regent’s Canal Towpath is the bank of the Regent’s Canal.
Regents Wharf, N1 Regents Wharf is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Ritson House, N1 Ritson House is a block on Caledonian Road.
Rodney House, N1 Rodney House is sited on Donegal Street.
Rodney Street, N1 Rodney Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Smith Street, N1C Smith Street was buried under St Pancras station.
Southern Street, N1 Southern Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Spitfire Studios, N1 Spitfire Studios is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
St Chads Place, WC1X St Chads Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
St Chads Street, WC1H St Chads Street was formerly Derby Street.
St Pancras Cruising Club, N1C St Pancras Cruising Club is a road in the N1C postcode area
St. Philip’s Way, N1C A street within the N1C postcode
Stable Street, N1C Stable Street is a road in the N1C postcode area
Stanley Building, N1C Stanley Building is a block on Pancras Square.
Stelfox House, WC1X Stelfox House is sited on Penton Rise.
Stuart Hill House, N1 Stuart Hill House is sited on Killick Street.
Tapestry Building, N1C Tapestry Building is a block on Canal Reach.
Terrett’s Place, N1 Terrett’s Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
The Circle, N1C The Circle is a road in the N1C postcode area
The Gridiron, N1C A street within the N1C postcode
The Hub, N1 Block in Kings Cross.
The Macmillan Building, N1 The Macmillan Building is a block on Crinan Street.
Thornhill Bridge Wharf, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Thurston House, N1 Thurston House is a block on Leirum Street.
Tiber Gardens, N1 Tiber Gardens is a road in the N1 postcode area
Treaty Street, N1 Treaty Street was called London Street until 1938.
Varnishers Yard, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Vernon Square, WC1X Vernon Square is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Watford Street, NW1 Watford Street was cleared away in the 1860s to make way to St Pancras station.
Weston Rise, N1 Weston Rise is a road in the N1 postcode area
Wharf Road, N1C Wharf Road is a location in London.
Wharfdale Road, N1 Wharfdale Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Wilsted Street, NW1 Wilsted Street was the original name for the lower end of Ossulston Street.
Wollstonecraft Street, N1C Wollstonecraft Street was the first name to be chosen from a naming competition by the developers of N1C.
Wynford Road, N1 Wynford Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
York Road Curve, N1 York Road Curve is a road in the N1 postcode area
York Way Court, N1 York Way Court is a block on York Way Court.
York Way, N1 York Way has been a thoroughfare since the twelfth century.

NEARBY PUBS


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King’s Cross






LOCAL PHOTOS
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The British Library
TUM image id: 1482066417
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Agar Town (1857)
Credit: Percy Lovell
TUM image id: 1499434317
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Cromer Street
TUM image id: 1547917827
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Goods Way - old sign
TUM image id: 1526241892
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Risinghill Street, N1
TUM image id: 1467032267
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Kings Place from York Way
Credit: Alan Stanton
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The British Library
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Caledonian Road looking north towards Holloway
Old London postcard
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Cromer Street
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Goods Way - old sign
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Brill Market in Somers Town (1858) Centre stage in this engraving of a busy market scene is the Brill Tavern itself, situated at the end of Brill Row.
Credit: Illustrated News of the World, London
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York Road was the name for a ’lost’ underground station on the Piccadilly Line north of King’s Cross. The road it was named after has also changed its name (to York Way)
Credit: The Underground Map
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York Road station when it was open. This used to be the first station north on the Piccadilly Line after King’s Cross St Pancras. Plans to reopen it have so far come to nothing.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Wollstonecraft Street sign
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St Pancras Station under construction (1867)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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