The mudlark

Pub/bar in/near Southwark

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  ·  MAPS  ·  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.50617 -0.08921, 51.506 -0.089) 
MAP YEAR:175018001810182018301860190019502022Show map without markers
ZOOM:14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 18 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 18
TIP: Adjust the MAP YEAR and ZOOM to tweak historical maps
Pub/bar · Southwark · SE1 ·
October
28
2019

This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.

If you know the current status of this business, please comment.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 499 completed street histories and 47001 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

Reply

Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

Reply
Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

Reply
Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

Reply
Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

Reply
Comment
Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

Reply

Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   

Hurley Road, SE11
There were stables in the road mid way - also Danny reading had a coal delivery lorry.

Reply
Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

Reply
Reply
Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

Reply

   
Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

Reply

LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

Reply
Comment
Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

Reply

Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

Reply
Comment
ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

Reply
Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


Reply
Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

Reply
Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

Reply
Comment
Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
London (1926) In 1926 Claude Friese-Greene shot some of the first-ever colour film footage around London, capturing everyday life.
St Magnus-the-Martyr St Magnus the Martyr church is dedicated to St Magnus the Martyr, earl of Orkney, who died on 16 April 1116.
The Shard The Shard - formerly London Bridge Tower is a 72-storey skyscraper, designed by the Italian architect Renzo Piano, in Southwark.
The Steelyard The Steelyard was the main trading base (kontor) of the Hanseatic League in London during 15th and 16th centuries.
Walbrook Wharf Walbrook Wharf is an operating freight wharf located in the City of London adjacent to Cannon Street station.

NEARBY STREETS
Adelaide House, EC3R Adelaide House is a Grade II listed Art Deco office building in the City of London.
Allhallows Lane, EC4R Allhallows Lane is named after the churches of All-Hallows-the-Great and Less.
America Street, SE1 America Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Anchor Terrace, SE1 Anchor Terrace is a large symmetrical building on the east side of Southwark Bridge Road, situated very close to the River Thames.
Angel Lane, EC4R Angel Lane was formerly Angel Passage.
Ayres Street, SE1 Ayres Street was formerly known as Whitecross Street.
Bakers Hall Court, EC3R Bakers’ Hall Court lies at the end of Harp Street.
Bank End, SE1 Bank End is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bankside, SE1 Bankside is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Battle Bridge Lane, SE1 Battle Bridge Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bear Gardens, SE1 Bear Gardens is the site of a medieval pleasure ground.
Bedale Street, SE1 Bedale Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Benbow House, SE1 Benbow House is a block on New Globe Walk
Betsham House, SE1 Residential block
Black Raven Alley, EC4R Black Raven Alley ran south from 105 Upper Thames Street down to Swan Wharf, just to the west of London Bridge.
Borough High Street, SE1 Borough High Street was the Roman ’Stane Street’.
Botolph Lane, EC3R Botolph Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Bowling Green Place, SE1 Bowling Green Place is a location in London.
Bursar Street, SE1 Bursar Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Cathedral Street, SE1 Cathedral Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Centennium House, EC3R A block within the EC3R postcode
Chaloner Court, SE1 Chaloner Court is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Chapel Court, SE1 Chapel Court has hosted The Blue-Eyed Maid pub since 1613.
Clennam Street, SE1 Clennam Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Clink Street, SE1 Clink Street is best known as the historic location of the Clink Prison.
Clink Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Collingwood Street, SE1 Collingwood Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Cottons Centre, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Cottons Lane, SE1 Cottons Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Counter Street, SE1 Counter Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Cousin Lane, EC4R Cousin Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Custom House Walkway, EC3R Custom House Walkway is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Dark Horse Walk, EC3R Dark Horse Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Disney Street, SE1 Disney Street is a location in London.
Doyce Street, SE1 Doyce Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Duke St Hill, SE1 Duke St Hill is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Duke Street Hill, SE1 Duke Street Hill is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
East Building 1, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Emerson Street, SE1 Emerson Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
English Grounds, SE1 English Grounds is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Fenning Street, SE1 Fenning Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Gatehouse Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Gloucester Court, EC3R Gloucester Court is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Grant’s Quay Wharf, EC3R Grant?s Quay Wharf is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Great Guildford Business Square, SE1 Great Guildford Business Square is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Great Guildford Street, SE1 Great Guildford Street runs north-south in Southwark.
Great Maze Pond, SE1 Great Maze Pond is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Green Dragon Court, SE1 Green Dragon Court ran off Bedale Street.
Halfmoon Yard, SE1 Halfmoon Yard lay off Borough High Street,
Hanseatic Walk, EC4R Hanseatic Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Hanseatic Walk, EC4R Hanseatic Walk is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Harp Lane, EC3R Harp Lane once connected Thames Street with Great Tower Street.
Hart Yard, E3 Hart Yard is a location in London.
Hay’s Lane, SE1 This is a street in the SE1 postcode area
Hays Galleria, SE1 Hays Galleria is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Hays Lane, SE1 Hays Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Heath Lodge, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Holyrood Court Business Centre, SE1 Holyrood Court Business Centre is a location in London.
Holyrood Street, SE1 Holyrood Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Horseshoe Wharf Apartments, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Idol Lane, EC3R Idol Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Joiner Street, SE1 Joiner Street is now part of London Bridge Street.
Joiner Street, SE1 Joiner Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Junction Approach, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Kentish Buildings, SE1 Kentish Buildings is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
King William Street, EC4R King William Street runs from a junction with Lombard Street to Monument junction from where continues south into London Bridge.
Kings Head Yard, SE1 Kings Head Yard is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Little Dorrit Court, SE1 Little Dorrit’s Court, North of Marshalsea Road, is named after the Dickens character.
Lockesley Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
London Bridge Street, SE1 London Bridge Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
London Bridge Walk, London Bridge Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
London Bridge, EC4R London Bridge is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Lovat Lane, EC3R Lovat Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Lower Thames Street, EC3R Lower Thames Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Magdalen Street, SE1 Magdalen Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Maiden Lane, SE1 Maiden Lane is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Maidstone Buildings Mews, SE1 Maidstone Buildings Mews is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Marlborough Gardens, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Maya House, SE1 Maya House, on Borough High Street, is notable for its distinctive sculptures.
Melior Place, SE1 Melior Place is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Melior Street, SE1 Melior Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Mermaid Court, SE1 Mermaid Court is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Minster Pavement, EC3R Minster Pavement is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Montague Close, SE1 Montague Close is a street close to London Bridge.
Monument Street, EC3R Monument Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
More London Place, SE1 More London Place is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Morgans Lane, SE1 Morgan’s Lane runs down to HMS Belfast.
New Globe Walk, SE1 New Globe Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Newcomen Street, SE1 Newcomen Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
O’Meara Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Old Billingsgate Walk, EC3R Old Billingsgate Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Oystergate Walk, EC4R Oystergate Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Oystergate Walk, SE1 Oystergate Walk is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Park Street, SE1 Park Street runs one block south of Bankside.
Peckham High Street, SE1 Peckham High Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Perkins Square, SE1 Perkins Square is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Porter Street, SE1 Porter Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Providian House, EC3R A block within the EC3R postcode
Queen St Place, EC4R Queen St Place is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Queen’s Head Yard, SE1 Queen’s Head Yard is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Railway Approach, SE1 Railway Approach is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Redcross Way, SE1 Redcross Way was previously called Red Cross Street.
Rochester Walk, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Rose Alley, SE1 Rose Alley is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Shand Street, SE1 Shand Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Shard Arcade, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Shipwright Yard, SE1 Shipwright Yard is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Snowsfields, SE1 Snowsfields is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Soho Wharf, SE1 Soho Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Solomon Way, E1 Solomon Way is a location in London.
Southwalk Street, SE1 Southwalk Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Southwark Bridge Road, SE1 Southwark Bridge Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Southwark Bridge, SE1 This is a street in the EC4R postcode area
St Dunstans Hill, EC3R St Dunstans Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
St Mary At Hill, EC3R St Mary At Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
St Thomas Street, SE1 St Thomas Street is an extremely old thoroughfare.
Stainer Street, SE1 Stainer Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Stoney Street, SE1 Stoney Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Swan Lane, EC4R Swan Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Talbot Yard, SE1 Talbot Yard used to host one of the most famous inns in English literature.
Thames Reach, SE28 Thames Reach is a location in London.
The Hop Exchange, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
The Mews, SE1 The Mews is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
The Ride, SE1 The Ride connected Bowling Green Lane (later Bowling Green Lane) and Tennis Court (later Tennis Street).
The Terrace, SE1 The Terrace is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Thrale Street, SE1 Thrale Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Three Crown Square, SE1 Three Crown Square is an official address within Borough Market.
Two London Bridge, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Victor Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
White Hart Yard, SE1 This is a street in the SE1 postcode area
Winchester Square, SE1 Winchester Square is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Winchester Walk, SE1 Winchester Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Winchester Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode

NEARBY PUBS
All bar one This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Barrow boy & banker This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Belushis & st christophers village This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Blue eyed maid This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bunch of grapes This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Cecil’s This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Jamies St Mary At Hill This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Katzenjammers This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lord clyde This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Old Swan The Old Swan Inn was one of the most well-known in the City of London.
Old thameside inn This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Oyster Shed This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Rose & crown This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Salotto 31 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Shipwrights arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Skinkers This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Slug and lettuce This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
St christopher’s This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Suchard free house This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Anchor The Anchor is a pub on the south bank of the River Thames, close to Southwark Cathedral and London Bridge station.
The Banker This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The boot & flogger This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Britannia This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The george inn This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The globe tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The heeltap This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The horniman at hays This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The horseshoe inn This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The kings arms public house This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The market porter This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Monument This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The mug house This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The rake This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The southwark tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Walrus & The Carpenter This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Vinopolis city of wine This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 499 completed street histories and 47001 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


Southwark

Southwark is the area immediately south of London Bridge, opposite the City of London.

Southwark is on a previously marshy area south of the River Thames. Recent excavation has revealed prehistoric activity including evidence of early ploughing, burial mounds and ritual activity. The area was originally a series of islands in the River Thames. This formed the best place to bridge the Thames and the area became an important part of Londinium owing its importance to its position as the endpoint of the Roman London Bridge. Two Roman roads, Stane Street and Watling Street, met at Southwark in what is now Borough High Street.

At some point the Bridge fell or was pulled down. Southwark and the city seem to have become largely deserted during the Early Middle Ages. Archaeologically, evidence of settlement is replaced by a largely featureless soil called the Dark Earth which probably (although this is contested) represents an urban area abandoned.

Southwark appears to recover only during the time of King Alfred and his successors. Sometime in and around 886 AD the Bridge was rebuilt and the City and Southwark restored. Southwark was called ’Suddringa Geworc’ which means the ’defensive works of the men of Surrey’. It was probably fortified to defend the bridge and hence the re-emerging City of London to the north. This defensive role is highlighted by the use of the Bridge as a defense against King Swein, his son King Cnut and in 1066, against King William the Conqueror. He failed to force the Bridge during the Norman conquest of England, but Southwark was devastated.

Much of Southwark was originally owned by the church - the greatest reminder of monastic London is Southwark Cathedral, originally the priory of St Mary Overy.

During the Middle Ages, Southwark remained outside of the control of the City and was a haven for criminals and free traders, who would sell goods and conduct trades outside the regulation of the City Livery Companies. An important market - later to become known as the Borough Market - was established there some time in the 13th century. The area was renowned for its inns, especially The Tabard, from which Chaucer’s pilgrims set off on their journey in The Canterbury Tales.

After many decades’ petitioning, in 1550, Southwark was incorporated into the City of London as ’The Ward of Bridge Without’. It became the entertainment district for London, and it was also the red-light area. In 1599, William Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre was built on the South Bank in Southwark, though it burned down in 1613. A modern replica, also called the Globe, has been built near the original site. Southwark was also a favorite area for entertainment like bull and bear-baiting. There was also a famous fair in Southwark which took place near the Church of St. George the Martyr. William Hogarth depicted this fair in his engraving of Southwark Fair (1733).

In 1844 the railway reached Southwark with the opening of London Bridge station.

In 1861 the Great Fire of Southwark destroyed a large number of buildings between Tooley Street and the Thames, including those around Hays Wharf, where Hays Galleria was later built, and blocks to the west almost as far as St Olave’s Church.

In 1899 Southwark was incorporated along with Newington and Walworth into the Metropolitan Borough of Southwark, and in 1965 this was incorporated with the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell and Metropolitan Borough of Bermondsey into the London Borough of Southwark.

Southwark tube station was opened on 20 November 1999 as part of the Jubilee Line Extension.

The original plan for the Extension did not include a station between those at Waterloo and London Bridge; Southwark station was added after lobbying by the local council. Although it is close to Waterloo, not near the Bankside attractions it was intended to serve, and its only rail interchange is to London Waterloo East mainline station; the passenger usage matches those of other minor central stations. It does however get over double the traffic of nearby Borough station and around triple Lambeth North.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Click here to see map view of nearby Creative Commons images
Click here to see Creative Commons images near to this postcode
Bank station
Credit: IG/steven.maddison
TUM image id: 1653840363
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Postal area SE1
TUM image id: 1483541461
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
TUM image id: 1557142131
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Bank station
Credit: IG/steven.maddison
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Georg Giese from Danzig, 34-year-old German merchant at the Steelyard, painted in London by Hans Holbein in 1532
Credit: Hans Holbein
Licence:


Walbrook Wharf is an operating freight wharf located in the City of London adjacent to Cannon Street station.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Wagstaff Buildings, Sumner Road, Bankside, c. 1920.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Southwark Cathedral
Credit: IG/aleks london diary
Licence: CC BY 2.0


"London Bridge from the Old Swan" by the Irish painter Hubert Pugh (1780) Shooting the tidal rapids at old London Bridge was dangerous; many passengers preferred to get off at the Old Swan, and walk. Immediately across the river in the painting is St Saviour’s Church, now Southwark Cathedral.
Credit: Hubert Pugh (Bank of England Museum)
Licence:


The Church of All Hallows Lombard Street as seen from Ball Alley in the 1820s. All Hallows was a rare City of London church not demolished due to the Great Fire or the Blitz but to falling attendances. Taken from ’The Churches of London’ by George Godwin (1839)
Credit: Robert William Billings and John Le Keux
Licence:


The Shard, taken from the Sky Garden on top of the ’Walkie-Talkie’ (2015)
Credit: Wiki Commons/Colin
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Adelaide House from above
Credit: https://manchesterhistory.net/
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Print-friendly version of this page

  Contact us · Copyright policy · Privacy policy