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Featured · Queen’s Park ·
July
5
2022
The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

Latest on The Underground Map...
High Barnet - Totteridge walk
This walk takes in the top of the Northern Line. High Barnet is a London Underground station and, in the past, a railway station, located in Chipping Barnet. It is the terminus of the High Barnet branch of the Northern line and is the start of a walk which takes us on to Totteridge and Whetstone station.

High Barnet station was an idea of the Edgware, Highgate and London Railway and was opened on 1 April 1872 by the Great Northern Railway which had taken over by then. It was situated on one of the original sites of the Barnet Fair and was the terminus of the branch line that ran from Finsbury Park via Highgate.

The section north of East Finchley was incorporated into the London Underground network because of the Northern Heights project begun in the late 1930s. High Barnet station was served by Northern line trains from 14 April 1940 onwards.

The station retains much of its original Victorian architectural character, with some platform buildings dating from the pre-London Transport era.
»more

MARCH
9
2022

 

Addle Street, EC2V
Addle Street, there from ancient times, was a victim of the bulldozer after the Second World War In the 1633 edition of Stow’s Survey it is suggested that the name is derived from King Adelstane, who is said to have had a house with an entrance in Adel Street, and that in evidence the street is called King Adel Street. There do not appear to be any records giving this form of the name. While the Saxon word Atheling means noble, Sheila Fairfield suggests that the word derives from the word for dung.

The church of St Mary Aldermanbury stood on the west side of Aldermanbury, between Love Lane and Addle Street.

General development of the area put paid to the street in the early 1960s.
»read full article


MARCH
8
2022

 

Regents Park Estate, NW1
The Regent’s Park Estate is a large housing estate in the London Borough of Camden In 1951, land was sold by the Crown Estate to the Metropolitan Borough of St Pancras after many of the buildings in the area suffered destruction during the Second World War. The Borough then built council housing - some 2000 homes on either side of Robert Street, between Albany Street and Hampstead Road.

Most of the estate is named after places in the Lake District such as Windermere, Cartmel and Rydal Water.

The site of the estate incorporates the sites of Cumberland Market, Munster Square and Clarence Gardens.


»read full article


MARCH
7
2022

 

Trafalgar Avenue, SE15
This area of Peckham, close to the Old Kent Road, was developed from the 1840s onwards In the 1850s, north Peckham was developing as a handsome, middle-class suburb. Leading south from the Old Kent Road, Trafalgar Road (later Trafalgar Avenue) was laid out including an earlier bridge (the Trafalgar Bridge) over the Grand Surrey Canal. The canal was filled in during 1970.

On the corner of Trafalgar Avenue and Waite Street, a pub was built: "The Victory".

After the Second World War and its war damage, much of the southern part of Trafalgar Avenue was demolished to make way for parkland.
»read full article


MARCH
6
2022

 

Galton Street, W10
Galton Street lies within the Queen’s Park Estate, W10 Because of its townscape and architectural quality and its historical interest, the Queen’s Park Estate was designed as a conservation area in 1978. A number of properties had been sold and many of them had already been "improved" in such an insensitive way that the visual unity of whole terraces was threatened.

The designation enabled the City Council to safeguard the character of the Estate and give guidance to owner-occupiers on suitable improvements. The conservation area was extended in 1991 to include parts of the Grand Union Canal and the Harrow Road Library (part of this extension was transferred to the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in 1994).
»read full article





LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Bob Land   
Added: 29 Jun 2022 13:20 GMT   

Map legends
Question, I have been looking at quite a few maps dated 1950 and 1900, and there are many abbreviations on the maps, where can I find the lists to unravel these ?

Regards

Bob Land

Reply
Comment
Alison   
Added: 26 Jun 2022 18:20 GMT   

On the dole in north London
When I worked at the dole office in Medina Road in the 1980s, "Archway" meant the social security offices which were in Archway Tower at the top of the Holloway Road. By all accounts it was a nightmare location for staff and claimants alike. This was when Margaret Thatcher’s government forced unemployment to rise to over 3 million (to keep wages down) and computerised records where still a thing of the future. Our job went from ensuring that unemployed people got the right sort and amount of benefits at the right time, to stopping as many people as possible from getting any sort of benefit at all. Britain changed irrevocably during this period and has never really recovered. We lost the "all in it together" frame of mind that had been born during the second world war and became the dog-eat-dog society where 1% have 95% of the wealth and many people can’t afford to feed their children. For me, the word Archway symbolises the land of lost content.

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Comment
Jack Wilson   
Added: 21 Jun 2022 21:40 GMT   

Penfold Printers
I am seeking the location of Penfold Printers Offices in Dt Albans place - probably about 1870 or so

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 19 Jun 2022 16:58 GMT   

Runcorn Place, W11
Runcorn place

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 30 May 2022 19:03 GMT   

The Three Magpies
Row of houses (centre) was on Heathrow Rd....Ben’s Cafe shack ( foreground ) and the Three Magpies pub (far right) were on the Bath Rd

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Comment
Watts   
Added: 17 May 2022 20:29 GMT   

Baeethoven St School, also an Annex for Paddington College of FE.
In the early 70’s I took a two year science course at Paddington CFE. The science classes were held on weekday evenings at Beethoven Street school, overseen by chemistry teacher, Mr Tattershall.

Reply

   
Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

Reply
Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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