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(51.523 -0.157, 51.537 -0.211) 
MAP YEAR:175018001810182018301860190019502024Show map without markers
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APRIL
20
2024
The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 666 completed street histories and 46834 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


JULY
31
2019

 

Alderney Street, SW1V
Alderney Street was originally Stanley Street, after George Stanley, local landowner. The Stanley family owned a plot of land here for centuries - hence the Stanley Arms in Lupus Street and Stanley Place. Streets of this name were so numerous in London that it had to be changed.

The streetname was changed to ’Alderley Street’ in 1879, still in honour of the Stanley of Alderley family. The family seemed not to be pleased with this change and so the name was changed once again.
»read full article


JULY
30
2019

 

St Mary Abbot’s
St Mary Abbots is a church located on Kensington High Street and the corner of Kensington Church Street in London W8. The present church structure was built in 1872 and designed by the celebrated architect Sir George Gilbert Scott, combining neo-Gothic and early-English styles. This edifice remains noted for having the tallest spire in London and is the latest in a series on the site since the beginning of the 12th century.
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JULY
24
2019

 

Walbrook Wharf
Walbrook Wharf is an operating freight wharf located in the City of London adjacent to Cannon Street station. It is used as a waste transfer station owned by the City of London Corporation and operated by Cory Environmental. Refuse from central London is transferred onto barges for transport to the Belvedere Incinerator in the London Borough of Bexley.

Walbrook Wharf was formerly arranged as a dock, but modern containerised loading has resulted in the infilling of the dock. The wharf is the point where the ancient stream, the Walbrook fed into the Thames, a location also known as Dowgate.
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JULY
17
2019

 

Blythe House
Blythe House is a listed building located at 23 Blythe Road. Blythe House was built between 1899 and 1903 as the main office of the Post Office Savings Bank, which had outgrown its previous headquarter in Queen Victoria Street. By 1902 the Bank had 12,000 branches and more than 9 million accounts.

Blythe House included a post office intended to deal with the official correspondence involved in the work of the Savings Bank. The post office handled about 100,000 letters every working day.

In 1963 the government announced that the Bank’s main centre of operations would be moved to Glasgow. A small headquarters staff remained in London, moving to Charles House on Kensington High Street. The Bank finally left Blythe House in the early 1970s.
»read full article


JULY
14
2019

 

St Gregory by St Paul’s
St Gregory’s by St Paul’s was a parish church in the Castle Baynard ward of the City of London. The church was dedicated to St Gregory the Great. It was in existence by 1010, when the body of St Edmund was housed there. The remains of the king, martyred in 870, had been translated to London from Bury St Edmunds by Alwyn, later Bishop of Elmham, for safe-keeping during a period of Danish raids, and were returned there three years later. The patronage of the church originally belonged to the crown, but during the reign of Henry VI it was transferred to the minor canons of St Paul’s.

Between June and November 1571, services were transferred from St Paul’s to St Gregory’s while fire damage was being repaired in the cathedral.

On 19 December 1591, Elizabeth Baldry, wife of the 2nd Baron Rich and mother-in-law to Penelope Devereux, Lady Rich, was buried at St Gregory’s.

The existence of the church came under threat while Inigo Jones was remodelling the cathedral in the 17th century. At first he thought that he could accommodate St G...
»more


JULY
10
2019

 

Passmore Edwards Public Library
The Passmore Edwards Public Library on the Uxbridge Road, Shepherd’s Bush, was built in 1895 and funded by the journalist and philanthropist Passmore Edwards. It is one of a number of public libraries that still bear his name today. In 2008 a new library was built in Shepherd’s Bush, part of the substantial Westfield London development, and the Passmore Edwards library fell into disuse. In October 2011 it re-opened as the new home of the Bush Theatre.


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JULY
4
2019

 

Bishop’s Wood
Together with Winnington Road, Ingram Avenue and the reknowned Bishop’s Avenue, the wood was named after Arthur Winnington-Ingram, who as Bishop of London, owned much of the surrounding area. Bishop’s Wood, with one further to the north called Mutton Wood, and another to the west known as Wild Wood, was a portion of the great wood attached to the estate and castle of the Bishop of London, at Highgate.

In 1755 it was purchased by Lord Mansfield, and left as a wild copse, strictly preserved as a cover for game.

Most of the land was sold privately in the early 20th century.
»read full article


JULY
2
2019

 

Boyle Street, W1S
Boyle Street was built on a piece of land called the Ten Acres to discharge some Boyle family debts. The Boyle family were the Earls of Burlington who held land rather than had money.

Jabez Collier, a lawyer, suggested that part of the Ten Acres, also known as Crabtree Field, which the Burlingtons used as a garden should be given over to building leases. In January 1718, Lord Burlington submitted a Bill in the House of Lords to permit him to grant building leases of the part of the Ten Acres lying behind Burlington-House Garden. On this piece of ground were built Boyle Street, Cork Street, Clifford Street, Old Burlington Street and some houses in New Bond Street.

The street runs east-west from the junction of the Coach and Horses Yard and Old Burlington Street, to Savile Row. Although mainly offices now, the street once had houses and the Burlington Charity Schoolhouse, built about 1720.
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JULY
1
2019

 

Northwick Park
Northwick Park is a park, suburb and tube station. The park was originally an estate which was part of Sheepcote Farm and named after its lord, Northwick. Middlesex County Council acquired 192 acres in the 1930s to create public land. The amount of public open space has since diminished, partly due to the building of Northwick Park Hospital.

The Metropolitan Railway run their lines through here in 1880. The station opened only in 1923 as the surrounding suburbs were built.

Kenton station on the Bakerloo line and London Overground is within walking distance.
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