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APRIL
20
2024
The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 666 completed street histories and 46834 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


JANUARY
30
2023

 

Ivy Chimneys Road, CM16
Ivy Chimneys Road runs along the southern edge of the town of Epping. The trustees of Epping and Ongar Highway Trust were responsible for collecting tolls and would use them to improve and maintain the road. To stop drivers diverting over Bell Common to avoid payment, a gate was placed on the Ivy Chimneys road. This was later marked by the Forest Gate Pub and why it was so-named.
»read full article


JANUARY
28
2023

 

Adelphi Terrace, WC2N
Adelphi Terrace is named after John and Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development in the 1760s. The Adam brothers created an elegant residential neighbourhood in the Adelphi, raised on high arches with lower streets underground at the level of the River Thames.

When the Adelphi plan was proposed, anxious to preserve the countryside views from his Strand banking house’s rear windows, Mr Coutts of the Strand purchased a share of the Durham Gardens property. He arranged with the Adam brothers that the new streets would be laid out to maintain the vista.

Robert Street was thus designed to frame the wealthy banker’s landscape. The land between William Street and John Street was then occupied by his underground strong rooms, connected to the office and built only to Strand level. When needing to expand, Coutts obtained a Parliamentary Act to build an arch over William Street.

The Adelphi’s unique elevated design thus resulted from an influential banker preserving his scenic outlook, dictating the streets’ arrangement through a development deal.
»read full article


JANUARY
27
2023

 

Western Avenue, NW11
Western Avenue is a road which dates from the period just after the First World War. The road connects Highfield Avenue and the North Circular Road. Unlike the other roads of the area such as Sinclair Grove, it was not laid out first for housing to follow later.

Once Brent (Cross) station had been opened, the road itself and the housing along Western Avenue were developed at the same time in 1925.
»read full article


JANUARY
26
2023

 

Layton’s Grove, SE1
Layton’s Grove was situated off Borough High Street, opposite Little Dorrit Court. Layton’s Grove was one of many yards and alleys that used to be line Borough High Street - many associated with pubs or coaching inns. There were possibly between 20 and 30 dwellings located here.

Layton’s Grove was replaced with office buildings after the immediate area was almost completely destroyed during the Blitz.
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JANUARY
25
2023

 

Faraday Road, W10
Faraday Road is one of the ’scientist’ roadnames of North Kensington. One of the main visions of the 2010s Portobello Square project was to reintroduce Victorian street patterns to the area, reconnecting Faraday Road with other main streets.

The post-war Wornington Green Estate had cut the street off from its hinterland.

In 1969, at corner of Faraday Road and Wornington Road, an adventure playground had been built on the site of Christ Church and its vicarage, demolished in 1949 after bomb damage.
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JANUARY
24
2023

 

Sinclair Grove, NW11
Sinclair Grove runs from Western Avenue to Golders Green Road. The accompanying photo dating from 1908 is a view of The Homestead from the end of the unfinished Sinclair Grove.

The area was transformed from the year 1907 onwards. The opening of the underground as far as Golders Green crossroads that year caused the rapid transformation from farmland to suburb. Ribbon development along the main road got as far as Highfield Avenue by the end of 1907 and continued as far as the River Brent by 1912.

This photo epitomises that transformation - we see the end of Sinclair Grove with the unnamed Western Avenue awaiting their houses. Meanwhile, across the fields we can still see "The Homestead" - a large house down a track from Golders Green Road until that year but now being dismantled.

The fields beyond remained in place until after the First World War.

Then the Northern Line was extended to Edgware in the early 1920s and the last of the countryside around Brent Cross disappeared under the tra...
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JANUARY
23
2023

 

Golders Green Road, NW11
Golders Green Road - known by many other names during its history - lies along an ancient road from London to Hendon. Golders Green, historically a rural area, saw drastic changes and developments over the years.

In 1751, Golders Green Road had two inns, the Hoop (which lent its name to Hoop Lane) and the White Swan. There were approximately 16 houses along the road with small gardens.

By the late 18th Century, Golders Green had already started to evolve. It was described as having "many ornamental villas and cottages surrounded with plantations." Before 1828, detached houses had extended on both sides of the road as far as Brent Bridge, indicating further suburban development.

In 1874, it was recorded that the green areas of Golders Green, which were manorial waste on both sides of Golders Green Road, were no longer being preserved. The Prince Albert pub had appeared by the 1850s.

During the late 19th Century, Golders Green gained a distinctive character from the villas situated in wooded grounds, including Alba Lodge, Golders Lodge, Glouce...
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JANUARY
22
2023

 

Highfield Avenue, NW11
Highfield Avenue runs between Golders Green Road and Hendon Way. It runs roughly along the line of an old footpath which connected the then Hendon Fever Hospital before the Hendon Way was built. The ’Highfield’ part of the name came from a large old house which stood at the corner of the road at the Golders Green Road end.

The road dates from before the First World War but houses were only built in the 1920s after the arrival of the station
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JANUARY
21
2023

 

East Ham
East Ham tube station is a London Underground station in the borough of Newham. East Ham station serves as a transport hub on both the District line and Hammersmith & City line. It was opened in 1858 by the London, Tilbury and Southend Railway as part of a new, more direct route from Fenchurch Street to Barking. The station features a large Edwardian building constructed to accommodate the electric District Railway services on an additional set of tracks that opened in 1905.

In the mid-19th century, East Ham was described as a "scattered village." However, the introduction of transportation options led to increasing urbanisation, particularly from 1890 onwards. East Ham received electric services from the District Railway in 1908.

The housing in East Ham primarily consists of Victorian and Edwardian terraced townhouses, many of which are located along tree-lined avenues.

Despite its urbanised environment, East Ham offers numerous green spaces. The graveyard of the Norman St Mary’s church has been maintained as a ...
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JANUARY
20
2023

 

West Ealing
West Ealing is located approximately three-quarters of a mile west of Ealing Broadway. Although the area has a long history of settlement, modern West Ealing is less than a century old.

In 1234, a hamlet known as West Ealing was recorded, later renamed Ealing Dean. The West Ealing railway station was initially called the Castle Hill & Ealing Dean Station when it was built in 1871. Ealing Dean, possibly deriving from "denu" (valley), was first referenced in 1456 and appeared on a 1777 Ealing parish map. Much of the area, which is now West Ealing, was open countryside with a few houses in locations like Ealing Dean, Drayton Green, and Castle Bear Hill (now Castlebar Hill).

In the late 19th century, Drayton was a hamlet with eight householders. A major east-west road in the area was known as the Uxbridge Road, serving as a popular stagecoach route in the 19th century. It had stops like the Halfway House pub, where the London-to-Banbury-and-Oxford coach made...
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JANUARY
19
2023

 

Wickhams
Wickhams was a department store on the north side of the Mile End Road in London. The Wickham family originally operated as drapers, conducting their business from 69, 71, and 73 Mile End Road. The adjacent property at No. 75 was occupied by the Spiegelhalter family, who were clockmakers and jewellers. In approximately 1892, the Spiegelhalters agreed to relocate from No. 75 to 81 Mile End Road, allowing the Wickhams to expand their shop into the newly vacated space.

The Spiegelhalter family, of German descent from the Black Forest village of Neukirch, had been in the East End of London since 1828, operating as jewellers and clockmakers. They had several shops before relocating to 75 Mile End Road and later to No. 81. Due to anti-German sentiment in the First World War, the Spiegelhalters changed their family name to Salter by deed poll in 1919. However, the shop retained its original name.

Over the course of 35 years, the Wickham family gradually acquired the entire block, except for the Spiegelhalters’ shop at No. 81. Their plan...
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JANUARY
18
2023

 

Tooley Street, SE1
Tooley Street is a road connecting London Bridge to St Saviour’s Dock. It runs past Tower Bridge on the Southwark/Bermondsey side of the River Thames. Olaf, King of Norway, fought with Æthelred the Unready against the Danes allegedly in what became the parish of St Olave’s, Southwark. He was canonised and the name was corrupted from St Olaf to Tooley.

The earliest historical mention of the church dates back to the Domesday Book of 1086, which included a reference to the church in the Southwark area. This church was located slightly to the east of the London Bridge at that time. The church was demolished in 1926 to make way for the headquarters of the Hay’s Wharf Company, known as "St Olaf House." The construction of St Olaf House took place between 1929 and 1931 and was designed in the Art Deco architectural style by Harry Stuart Goodhart-Rendel (1887–1959). The building features a legend and a mural depicting Saint Olaf.

A devastating two-day fire started on 22 June 1861 during a period when the fire "brigade," officially known as the London Fire Engine Establishment, was under the manag...
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JANUARY
17
2023

 

Lansdowne Terrace, WC1N
Lansdowne Terrace is a street located in Bloomsbury which stretches from south to north, connecting Guilford Street to Brunswick Square. On the west side of Lansdowne Terrace, there are houses, while the eastern side is bordered by Coram’s Fields.

Houses numbered 1 to 4 are designated as Grade II listed properties. These houses were constructed in 1794 and were designed by the architect James Burton.

At the northern end of Lansdowne Terrace, you’ll encounter the main entrance to International Hall, a university hall of residence that is owned by the University of London.

Lansdowne Place was renamed as Lansdowne Terrace in 1938 and both are after William Petty, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne, Prime Minister in 1782.
»read full article


JANUARY
16
2023

 

Mile End Place, E1
A quiet side street off the bustling Mile End Road, lies a small and enchanting enclave known as Mile End Place. Despite its proximity to the main road, the entrance to Mile End Place is often overlooked due to its unassuming appearance. It looks like a goods entrance to the back of the shops.

Venturing further into Mile End Place reveals a row of charming 19th-century cottages adorned with gardens that spill over onto the pavements. Originally constructed as workers’ homes for the nearby Charrington’s brewery, some of these cottages are still occupied by former Charrington’s pensioners. The rented cottages provide the residents with the unique experience of being in close proximity to the main road while remaining completely hidden away from its hustle and bustle.

Surrounding this quaint street lie three distinct Jewish cemeteries. These cemeteries, shielded by high walls, create an air of secrecy, often unbeknownst to those who live in the area. They serve as a reminder of a time when the East End had a significant Jewish population. The oldest o...
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JANUARY
15
2023

 

Millfield Lane, N6
Millfield Lane, located on the eastern side of Hampstead Heath, starts as a narrow, unpaved semi-rural track that runs from Kenwood House to Merton Lane. Along its more rural course, it passes by the Bird Sanctuary Pond and Kenwood Ladies’ Bathing Pond, all the while enclosed by lush vegetation and shaded by venerable trees. This creates a special wildlife corridor where the sounds of tawny owls and birdsong provide an escape from the urban clamour of London.

Further south Millfield Lane becomes a paved road.

Millfield Lane is a favoured route for various outdoor enthusiasts, including walkers, joggers and cyclists. It provides the only access route to the Ladies’ Pond during the winter months.

The history of this area is rich, dating back to the Middle Ages. It has been known by different names over the centuries, including Cut Through Lane, Nightingale Lane, and Poets’ Lane, where renowned poets Keats and Coleridge once met. Interestingly, its name also stems from its connection to Charles II and his illegitimate son, Charles Fitzroy.

Originally part of the...
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JANUARY
14
2023

 

Burdett Road, E3
Burdett Road is a major north-south road in east London. Constructed in 1858, Burdett Road initially bore the name Victoria Park Approach Road as it provided access from the docks to Victoria Park. On 19 December 1862, it underwent a name change to Burdett Road in honour of philanthropist Angela Burdett-Coutts. The renaming faced objections from the Limehouse Board of Works, citing concerns of being unpatriotic, "ridiculous," and potentially detrimental to house prices. Nonetheless, the name Burdett Road was retained, as it had gained popularity in the Mile End area.

Burdett Road once had a station named after it. This closed in 1941.

In the present day, Burdett Road is integrated into the North and East London Red route system. Beyond the junction with Bow Road and Mile End Road, it continues as Burdett Road, serving as the western boundary of the Lansbury Estate. It ceases to demarcate the boundary of Mile End Park after passing Mile End Stadium and traversing under the London, Tilbury and Southend line.
»read full article


JANUARY
13
2023

 

Kenwood House
Kenwood House, also known as the Iveagh Bequest, is a former stately home situated on the northern border of Hampstead Heath. Kenwood House was originally built in the 17th century and it served as the residence of the Earls of Mansfield during the 18th and 19th centuries.

In 1925, the house and a portion of its grounds were purchased from the 6th Earl of Mansfield by Edward Guinness, 1st Earl of Iveagh. Subsequently, in 1927, the property was donated to the nation. The entire estate came under the ownership of the London County Council, and by the late 1920s, it was open to the public.

Today, Kenwood House continues to be a popular local tourist attraction.
»read full article


JANUARY
12
2023

 

St Mark’s Road, W11
St Mark’s Road is a street in the Ladbroke conservation area. St Mark’s Road, situated within the Ladbroke estate, was one of the final areas to be developed. Construction in this area began around 1863, and the terraced houses, typically three stories in height with basements, were built progressively between that time and 1865. Charles Blake was the developer responsible for this project, with Philip Baker, a builder, completing most of the housing work in 1865.

St Mark’s Road endured significant damage during the Second World War. The buildings that stand there today were constructed after the war, with the post-war construction dating back to 1967.

»read full article


JANUARY
11
2023

 

Southwark Street, SE1
Southwark Street is a major street just south of the River Thames. It runs between Blackfriars Road to the west and Borough High Street. In April 1856, the St Saviour’s District Board made a request to the Metropolitan Board of Works for the creation of a new street that would connect the South Eastern Railway terminus at London Bridge station with the West End. This street marked the first project undertaken by the Board and was successfully completed in 1864. It was constructed through a densely populated section of the parish, necessitating the crossing of pre-existing roads and streets, resulting in irregularly shaped plots for future development. The intersection of this new street with Borough High Street is subtly curved, creating a somewhat confusing transition between the two streets. To exacerbate the situation, the lack of a Street Name Plate and inconsistent street numbering further complicates identification. The division between them occurs at the junction with Bedale Street on the northern side, while on the southern side, the street only begins after the ’fork’ opposite Stoney Street, ...
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JANUARY
10
2023

 

St Botolph’s
St Botolph’s without Aldgate, located on Aldgate High Street, has existed for over a thousand years. The church was one of four in medieval London dedicated to St. Botolph, a 7th-century East Anglian saint. Each of these churches stood by one of the gates of the London Wall. The other churches dedicated to St. Botolph were St. Botolph’s, Billingsgate (which was destroyed by the Great Fire of London and not rebuilt), St. Botolph’s, Aldersgate, and St. Botolph’s, Bishopsgate.

The earliest written record of this church dates back to 1115 when it was received by the Holy Trinity Priory, recently founded by Matilda, the wife of Henry I. However, the parochial foundations may have existed even before the year 1066. The first recorded Rector of the church was in office by 1108, which predates the first recorded instance of the church itself.

The original Saxon church building underwent enlargement in 1418 and was extensively rebuilt in the sixteenth century. Inside the church, one can find monuments dedicated to historical figures from the Mid...
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JANUARY
9
2023

 

The Bishops Avenue, N2
The Bishops Avenue is a prestigious road connecting East Finchley with the north side of Hampstead Heath at Kenwood (Hampstead Lane). The Bishops Avenue straddles the boundary between the London Boroughs of Barnet and Haringey and is renowned as one of the wealthiest streets globally.

It is famous for its extreme wealth and opulent residences - it is considered one of the most expensive streets in the world. Property prices started surpassing £1 million in the late 1980s. The houses on this street are situated on 2-3 acre plots and some are valued at tens of millions of pounds.

The name derives from the bishops of London, who owned a large hunting park in the area in the late Middle Ages. Much of this land was sold privately in the early 20th century. Currently, only one house on the street is owned by the Church.

The avenue is home to 66 houses, each showcasing a variety of architectural styles. Alongside the parallel street, Winnington Road, it boasts an array of impressive and unique homes.

The street has seen several high-profile property sales. For in...
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JANUARY
8
2023

 

Tottenham Court Road
Tottenham Court Road runs from St Giles’ Circus (the junction of Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road) north to Euston Road. The area through which Tottenham Court Road now runs was mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to St Paul’s Cathedral’s Dean and Chapter. In Henry III’s time (1216-1272), a manor house just northwest of the modern corner of Tottenham Court Road and Oxford Street was owned by one William de Tottenhall. Around the 1400s, the area was variously called Totten, Totham, or Totting Hall. After changing hands repeatedly, Queen Elizabeth leased the manor for 99 years when it became popularly known as Tottenham Court. A century later, it apparently passed to the Fitzroys, who built Fitzroy Square on part of the manor estate in the late 1700s.

A major shopping street, Tottenham Court Road is best known for its high concentration of consumer electronics stores, from cable and component specialists to package computer and audio-video dealers. Further north, several furniture shops including Habitat and Heals can be found.

In the 1950s-60s, Tot...
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JANUARY
7
2023

 

Angel
Angel tube station is a London Underground station in The Angel, Islington. It is on the Bank branch of the Northern Line. Angel station has a history dating back to its origin with the City & South London Railway in 1901. Originally, it served as the northern terminus of a new extension from Moorgate. Interestingly, it is one of five stations on the Underground named after a public house – in this case, the famous Angel inn, which has a history dating back to at least 1638.

Initially, the station was constructed with a single central island platform accommodating two tracks, a design still evident at stations like Clapham North and Clapham Common. Access from street level was provided via lifts.

Over the years, Angel station faced persistent issues including congestion, overcrowding, and passenger discomfort due to its very narrow island platform, measuring barely 3.7 meters in width. This posed significant safety concerns.

In response to these challenges, the station underwent a comprehensive reconstruction and reopened in 1992. The lifts and the original g...
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JANUARY
6
2023

 

Claremont Close, EC1R
Claremont Close occupies a location that was initially developed in the 1820s as Claremont Mews, primarily serving Claremont Terrace and the northern side of Myddelton Square. Claremont Close now comprises eight blocks of six flats, arranged in a curved formation around an oval lawn and flowerbeds. The building exteriors exhibit a municipal neo-Georgian style.

By the early 20th century, the original Claremont Close had undergone significant conversion into industrial spaces, although a few families still resided there in conditions that were criticised in 1929.

In 1934–6, the New River Company initiated the transformation of the mews into the present suburban-classical residential complex known as Claremont Close. The architectural design was entrusted to Lewis Solomon & Son, with Henry Kent Ltd serving as the builders for the project.

During a bombing raid in January 1941, the two southernmost blocks suffered extensive damage, similar to the destruction that occurred on the north side of Myddelton Square during the same attack. However, they were subsequently reconstructed according to the original plans, and...
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JANUARY
5
2023

 

Vine Street, SW1Y
Vine Street is a short dead-end street running east from Swallow Street and is parallel to Piccadilly. Vine Street was once longer before being shortened by Regent Street construction in the early 1800s.

Vine Street takes its name from an 18th-century pub called The Vine, possibly named after a vineyard dating back to Roman times at this site. In 1675, records listed it as Little Swallow Street. The street was laid out around 1686, originally extending farther along what is now Man in the Moon Passage. John Rocque’s 1746 map depicts Vine Street stretching northeast from Piccadilly to Warwick Street. By 1720, a brewery and carpenter’s yard were the main properties on Vine Street.

Construction of Regent Street between 1816-1819 split Vine Street into two sections. Man in the Moon Passage was created then, referencing a former pub. The northern part towards Warwick Street became Great Vine Street, then Warwick Street itself, before disappearing after 1920 Regent Street Quadrant rebuilding.

In 1853, Charles Moreign bought small ho...
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JANUARY
4
2023

 

Fisherton Street, NW8
Until 1877, most of Fisherton Street was known as Upper Salisbury Street. J.H.Ahern’s map 1827 map shows the site as temporary cottages and gardens. By 1850, terraced houses filled the land.

Victoria Place was absorbed into Fisherton Street in 1914.

The Fisherton Street Estate was constructed in 1924 under the 1923 Housing Act, part of national efforts to provide "Homes Fit for Heroes" after the First World War. Designed by H.V. Ashley and Winton Newman, the estate featured centralised water boilers for the entire development.

Fisherton Street was lengthened after the Estate was built.


»read full article


JANUARY
3
2023

 

Charlton
’Charlton next Woolwich’ was an ancient parish in the county of Kent, which became part of the metropolitan area of London in 1855. The parish of Charlton is first recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book as Cerletone, meaning "farmstead of the freemen or peasants" in Old English. In 1093, the manor was granted to Bermondsey Abbey by the Bishop of Lincoln. In 1268, the Abbey obtained rights to hold a market and fair in Charlton. In the early 1700s, Daniel Defoe described Charlton’s notorious annual Horn Fair. The North Kent railway line reached Charlton in 1849.

Aside from the modern Thames Barrier and The Valley stadium, Charlton’s most notable landmark is Jacobean Charlton House, built in 1607-1612 for tutor to Prince Henry, Adam Newton. Nearby St. Luke’s Church is the burial site of Prime Minister Spencer Perceval and civil servant Edward Drummond. Charlton House became home to the Maryon-Wilson family, namesakes of two local parks. Since 1925, the Royal Borough of Greenwich has owned Charlton House, now a library and community centre.

With its parks, historic homes an...
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JANUARY
2
2023

 

Preston Road, HA3
Preston Road is a main shopping road leading past the station of the same name. Preston emerged in 1220 as a small settlement centred around Preston Green, just southwest of the Lidding or Wealdstone Brook. The settlement’s name may originate from an estate granted to Abbot Stidberht by King Offa (it means ’the farm belonging to the priest’), though any connection to the rural Preston Road was lost by 1086. Preston was established as a township by 1231.

By the mid-1400s, Preston consisted of two farms and some cottages. The northern Lyon family farm, dating to the late 1300s, was described as beautiful in 1547 and was likely the birthplace of John Lyon. He founded Harrow School in 1572, after which the farm supported the school, being rebuilt around 1700. The southern farm was first called Preston Dicket before becoming Preston Farm.

Around 1850, the short-lived “Rose & Crown” beerhouse opened at Preston Hill, likely part of Hillside Farm.

The popular Preston Tea Gardens under George Timms was ope...
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JANUARY
1
2023

 

Preston Road
Preston Road - originally just ’Preston’ - is situated west along the Metropolitan Line from Wembley Park. Preston emerged in 1220 as a small settlement centred around Preston Green, just southwest of the Lidding or Wealdstone Brook, south of Kenton. Its name may originate from a 767 estate granted to Abbot Stidberht by King Offa (it means ’the farm belonging to the priest’), though any connection to the rural Preston Road was lost by 1086. Preston was established as a township by 1231.

By the mid-1400s, Preston consisted of two farms and some cottages. The northern Lyon family farm, dating to the late 1300s, was described as beautiful in 1547 and was likely the birthplace of John Lyon. He founded Harrow School in 1572, after which the farm supported the school, being rebuilt around 1700. The southern farm was first called Preston Dicket before becoming Preston Farm.

Preston saw little growth until 1681 when five buildings, including Hillside farmhouse, arose at Preston Green. In 1751, the "Horseshoe" inn was licensed, bringing the total buildings ...
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