The Underground Map


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(51.523 -0.157, 51.537 -0.211) 
MAP YEAR:175018001810182018301860190019502024Show map without markers
Use the control in the top right of the map above to view this area on another historic map
 
APRIL
20
2024
The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 666 completed street histories and 46834 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


MAY
24
2023

 

Dunk Street
Dunk Street ran parallel to Great Garden Street (now Greatorex Street) to the west, and King Edward Street, which has also ceased to exist, to the east. Dunk Street stretched approximately 200 metres from Old Montague Street to Hanbury Street, situated about 300 metres east of Baker’s Row, which is now the southern section of Vallance Road.

In 1643, Edward Montague, William Montague, and Mawrice Tresham acquired property from William Smith and others in the future Mile End New Town and Spitalfields areas.

This property comprised around forty-two or forty-three acres, which included five enclosed fields, a nursery, and a garden plot. A portion of this land would later become the southern half of Mile End New Town. Edward Montague eventually came into possession of all this land by approximately 1680.

The name Pelham Street was derived from Edward Montague’s wife, Elizabeth Pelham, who held ownership prior to their marriage.

In 1691, Elizabeth Pelham obtained a private Act that allowed her to grant leases for the rebuilding of dilapidated properties on her estates i...
»more


MAY
19
2023

 

Fountains Abbey
The Fountains Abbey was opened in 1824 and quickly became a popular meeting place for locals. The name of the pub comes from two different sources; ’Fountains’ from the nearby sites of springs and wells, which were essential sources of water to the local inhabitants; and ’Abbey’ which comes from Westminster Abbey, and which owned the manor of Paddington in Saxon times.

It was rebuilt in 1895 and later Sir Alexander Fleming was reputedly a regular customer at the pub.
»read full article


MAY
13
2023

 

Wimbledon to Wimbledon Park walk
Traversing SW19 Oops. This text is not quite ready
»read full article


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