Ayres Street, SE1

Road in/near Borough, existing between the 1710s and now.

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(51.50325 -0.0953, 51.503 -0.095) 
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Road · * · SE1 ·
MARCH
30
2021
Ayres Street was formerly known as Whitecross Street.

Ayres Street changed name in tribute to Alice Ayres - also immortalised in Postman’s Park in the City. Ayres lost her life whilst saving three children from a fire in Union Street in 1885.

John Strype mentions Whitecross Street in his 1720 ’Survey of the Cities of London and Westminster’. He called it "a pretty clean Street, but ordinary Built and Inhabited." It is unknown how long before 1710 that the street was built.

The White Cross Cottages were built in 1890 by social reformer Octavia Hill and designed by Elijah Hoole, as model social housing. They include a hall with interior decoration by Walter Crane.

Octavia Hill - who also founded of the National Trust - campaigned for better living conditions for the poor. She had built thousands of homes by the time of her death. Hill operated on a '5% principle' - investment in such philanthropic ventures should provide a 5% return on capital. Surplus rental income was put into schemes including education and playgrounds and open spaces.

The properties were managed by a network of female volunteers (and later paid workers) who operated a system of weekly visits to collect the rent. Those visits allowed the women to perform a social work role in getting to know the family and help with issues such as finding employment.

The housing scheme grew enormously, and gradually moved from refurbishing existing properties to building new ones as well - including White Cross Cottages and also nearby Red Cross Cottages.

The dense grain of local small buildings was in part eroded after the Second World War. As redevelopment occurred, larger blocks, occupied by single uses, replaced the Georgian and Victorian houses, shops and warehouses. This is particularly evident in the area between Ayres Street and Southwark Bridge Road.



Ayres Street, with its distinctive streetlamps
(click image to enlarge)




Citation information: Southwark streets – The Underground Map
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

Reply

   
Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

Reply
Comment
Peter   
Added: 4 Dec 2023 07:05 GMT   

Gambia Street, SE1
Gambia Street was previously known as William Street.

Reply
Comment
Vic Stanley   
Added: 24 Feb 2024 17:38 GMT   

Postcose
The postcode is SE15, NOT SE1

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Gillian   
Added: 17 Feb 2024 00:08 GMT   

No 36 Upper East Smithfield
My great great grandfather was born at No 36 Upper East Smithfield and spent his early years staring out at a "dead wall" of St Katharine’s Docks. His father was an outfitter and sold clothing for sailors. He describes the place as being backed by tenements in terrible condition and most of the people living there were Irish.

Reply

Kevin Pont   
Added: 16 Feb 2024 20:32 GMT   

Name origin
Interestingly South Lambeth derives its name from the same source as Lambeth itself - a landing place for lambs.

But South Lambeth has no landing place - it is not on the River Thames

Reply

C Hobbs   
Added: 31 Jan 2024 23:53 GMT   

George Gut (1853 - 1861)
George Gut, Master Baker lived with his family in Long Lane.
George was born in Bernbach, Hesse, Germany and came to the UK sometime in the 1840s. In 1849, George married an Englishwoman called Matilda Baker and became a nauralized Englishman. He was given the Freedom of the City of London (by Redemption in the Company of Bakers), in 1853 and was at that time, recorded as living at 3 Long Lane. In the 1861 census, George Gut was living at 11 Long Lane.

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Comment
Emma Beach   
Added: 18 Jan 2024 04:33 GMT   

William Sutton Thwaites
William Sutton Thwaites was the father of Frances Lydia Alice Knorr nee Thwaites�’�’she was executed in 1894 in Melbourne, Victoria Australia for infanticide. In the year prior to his marriage, to her mother Frances Jeanette Thwaites nee Robin, William Sutton was working as a tailor for Mr Orchard who employed four tailors in the hamlet of Mile End Old Town on at Crombies Row, Commercial Road East.

Source: 1861 England Census Class: Rg 9; Piece: 293; Folio: 20; Page: 2; GSU roll: 542608

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Comment
Simon   
Added: 15 Jan 2024 15:44 GMT   

Simon De Charmes, clockmaker
De Charmes (or Des Charmes), Simon, of French Huguenot extraction. Recorded 1688 and Free of the Clockmakers’ Company 1691-1730. In London until 1704 at least at ’his House, the Sign of the Clock, the Corner of Warwick St, Charing Cross’. See Brian Loomes The Early Clockmakers of Great Britain, NAG Press, 1981, p.188

Reply
Born here
Jacqueline Mico   
Added: 14 Jan 2024 07:29 GMT   

Robert Bolam
This is where my grandad was born, he went on to be a beautiful man, he became a shop owner, a father, and grandfather, he lost a leg when he was a milkman and the horse kicked him, then opened a shop in New Cross and then moved to Lewisham where he had a Newsagents and tobacconists.

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Comment
Tom Hughes   
Added: 5 Jan 2024 14:11 GMT   

4 Edwardes Terrace
In 1871, Mrs. Blake, widow of Gen. Blake, died in her home at 4 Edwardes Terrace, leaving a fortune of 140,000 pounds, something like 20 million quid today. She left no will. The exact fortune may have been exaggerated but for years claimants sought their share of the "Blake millions" which eventually went to "the Crown."

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Matthew Proctor   
Added: 7 Dec 2023 17:36 GMT   

Blackheath Grove, SE3
Road was originally known as The Avenue, then became "The Grove" in 1942.

From 1864 there was Blackheath Wesleyan Methodist Chapel on this street until it was destroyed by a V2 in 1944

Reply

Borough

Borough tube station is a London Underground station in the London Borough of Southwark. It is on the Northern Line, between Elephant and Castle and London Bridge stations.

The Borough (of Southwark) is an area of the London Borough of Southwark situated 1.5 miles east south-east of Charing Cross.

The area has been called The Borough since the 1550s, to contrast it with the neighbouring City, in later years to distinguish it from the larger Metropolitan Borough of Southwark and now to distinguish it from the much larger London Borough of Southwark.

Much of the area around the Tate Modern gallery and the Globe Theatre is now referred to by the historic name of Bankside.

In common with much of the South Bank, The Borough has seen extensive regeneration in the last decade. Declining light industry and factories have given way to residential development, shops, restaurants, galleries and bars. The area is in easy walking distance of the City and the West End.

The Borough is generally an area of mixed development, with council estates, office developments, social housing and gated communities side by side with each other.

Borough station was opened on 18 December 1890 as part of the first deep-level tube railway, the City and South London Railway, and was rebuilt in the 1920s when the tunnels were enlarged.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Bank station
Credit: IG/steven.maddison
TUM image id: 1653840363
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Postal area SE1
TUM image id: 1483541461
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
TUM image id: 1557142131
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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