Cromer Street, WC1H

Road in/near Bloomsbury, existing between 1818 and now.

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(51.5279 -0.12173, 51.527 -0.121) 
MAP YEAR:175018001810182018301860190019502024 
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Road · * · WC1H ·
December
27
2021
Cromer Street originally gave access from Gray’s Inn Road to Greenland Place and a bowling green.

Cromer Street was originally to be called Lucas Street but was renamed soon after its construction in 1818. The line of the future street as a path can be seen on the 1750 and 1800 maps.

Situated on the street, the Church of the Holy Cross was built by Joseph Peacock and dedicated in 1888.

After most of the original 105 houses on the street were demolished, Cromer Street was largely been rebuilt and now consists of over 1000 council and housing properties.

The Boot Tavern, on the corner of Cromer Street, was the headquarters of the Gordon rioters and later was mentioned in Charles Dickens’ book, Barnaby Rudge. It was rebuilt in 1801.

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Main source: Cromer Street - Wikipedia
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
P Cash   
Added: 19 Feb 2023 08:03 GMT   

Occupants of 19-29 Woburn Place
The Industrial Tribunals (later changed to Employment Tribunals) moved (from its former location on Ebury Bridge Road to 19-29 Woburn Place sometime in the late 1980s (I believe).

19-29 Woburn Place had nine floors in total (one in the basement and two in its mansard roof and most of the building was occupied by the Tribunals

The ’Head Office’ of the tribunals, occupied space on the 7th, 6th and 2nd floors, whilst one of the largest of the regional offices (London North but later called London Central) occupied space in the basement, ground and first floor.

The expansive ground floor entrance had white marble flooring and a security desk. Behind (on evey floor) lay a square (& uncluttered) lobby space, which was flanked on either side by lifts. On the rear side was an elegant staircase, with white marble steps, brass inlays and a shiny brass handrail which spiralled around an open well. Both staircase, stairwell and lifts ran the full height of the building. On all floors from 1st upwards, staff toilets were tucked on either side of the staircase (behind the lifts).

Basement Floor - Tribunal hearing rooms, dormant files store and secure basement space for Head Office. Public toilets.

Geound Floor - The ’post’ roon sat next to the entrance in the northern side, the rest of which was occupied by the private offices of the full time Tribunal judiciary. Thw largest office belonged to the Regional Chair and was situated on the far corner (overlooking Tavistock Square) The secretary to the Regional Chair occupied a small office next door.
The south side of this floor was occupied by the large open plan General Office for the administration, a staff kitchen & rest room and the private offices of the Regional Secretary (office manager) and their deputy.

First Dloor - Tribunal hearing rooms; separate public waiting rooms for Applicants & Respondents; two small rooms used by Counsel (on a ’whoever arrives first’ bases) and a small private rest room for use by tribunal lay members.

Second Floor - Tribunal Hearing Rooms; Tribunal Head Office - HR & Estate Depts & other tennants.

Third Floor - other tennants

Fourth Floor - other tennants

Fifth Floor - Other Tennants except for a large non-smoking room for staff, (which overlooked Tavistock Sqaure). It was seldom used, as a result of lacking any facities aside from a meagre collection of unwanted’ tatty seating. Next to it, (overlooking Tavistock Place) was a staff canteen.

Sixth Floor - Other tennants mostly except for a few offices on the northern side occupied by tribunal Head Office - IT Dept.

Seventh Floor - Other tenants in the northern side. The southern (front) side held the private offices of several senior managers (Secretariat, IT & Finance), private office of the Chief Accuntant; an office for two private secretaries and a stationary cupboard. On the rear side was a small kitchen; the private office of the Chief Executive and the private office of the President of the Tribunals for England & Wales. (From 1995 onwards, this became a conference room as the President was based elsewhere. The far end of this side contained an open plan office for Head Office staff - Secretariat, Finance & HR (staff training team) depts.

Eighth Floor - other tennants.


The Employment Tribunals (Regional & Head Offices) relocated to Vitory House, Kingsway in April 2005.






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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Mike Dowling   
Added: 15 Jun 2024 15:51 GMT   

Family ties (1936 - 1963)
The Dowling family lived at number 13 Undercliffe Road for
Nearly 26 years. Next door was the Harris family

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Comment
Evie Helen   
Added: 13 Jun 2024 00:03 GMT   

Vickers Road
The road ’Vickers Road’ is numbered rather differently to other roads in the area as it was originally built as housing for the "Vickers" arms factory in the late 1800’s and early 1900s. Most of the houses still retain the original 19th century tiling and drainage outside of the front doors.

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Paul Harris    
Added: 12 Jun 2024 12:54 GMT   

Ellen Place, E1
My mother’s father and his family lived at 31 Ellen Place London E1 have a copy of the 1911 census showing this

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 10 Jun 2024 19:31 GMT   

Toll gate Close
Did anyone live at Toll Gate Close, which was built in the area where the baths had been?

Reply

Charles Black   
Added: 24 May 2024 12:54 GMT   

Middle Row, W10
Middle Row was notable for its bus garage, home of the number 7.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 2 May 2024 16:14 GMT   

Farm Place, W8
The previous name of Farm Place was Ernest St (no A)

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Comment
Tony Whipple   
Added: 16 Apr 2024 21:35 GMT   

Frank Whipple Place, E14
Frank was my great-uncle, I’d often be ’babysat’ by Peggy while Nan and Dad went to the pub. Peggy was a marvel, so full of life. My Dad and Frank didn’t agree on most politics but everyone in the family is proud of him. A genuinely nice, knowledgable bloke. One of a kind.

Reply
Comment
Theresa Penney   
Added: 16 Apr 2024 18:08 GMT   

1 Whites Row
My 2 x great grandparents and his family lived here according to the 1841 census. They were Dutch Ashkenazi Jews born in Amsterdam at the beginning of the 19th century but all their children were born in Spitalfields.

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LOCAL PHOTOS
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The British Library
TUM image id: 1482066417
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Agar Town (1857)
Credit: Percy Lovell
TUM image id: 1499434317
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Goods Way - old sign
TUM image id: 1526241892
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The British Library
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Doughty Street is a broad tree lined street in the Holborn district.
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Rainy St Pancras
Credit: IG/legere photos
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Goods Way - old sign
Licence: CC BY 2.0


John Street, looking up Doughty Street (1949)
Credit: Rene Groebli
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Cab shelter, Russell Square
Credit: The Underground Map
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The Brill Market in Somers Town (1858) Centre stage in this engraving of a busy market scene is the Brill Tavern itself, situated at the end of Brill Row.
Credit: Illustrated News of the World, London
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Keystone Crescent, just on the side of King’s Cross station, has the smallest radius of any crescent in Europe, and has collection of old preserved houses
Credit: Flickr/Barbara Smith
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Fountain commemorating the Lamb’s Conduit (2006) This is situated at the junction of Lamb’s Conduit Street and Guilford Street
Credit: Wiki Commons/R Sones
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An old London bus being drawn by horses on its way to St Pancras Goods Station (1937) Next, its roof will be removed to enable it to fit on a railway trolley and then it will be transported to Chesterfield, Derbyshire for breaking up.
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