Lant Street, SE1

Road in/near Elephant and Castle, existing between 1773 and now.

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(51.50129 -0.09618, 51.501 -0.096) 
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Road · * · SE1 ·
November
18
2020
Lant Street derives its name from the Lant family who inherited the estates known as Southwark Place.

The area around Lant Street was once known as The Mint. It was a slum area until as late as the 19th century but also a ’liberty’ with privileges for debtors until The Mint in Southwark Act (1722) removed these rights.

Much earlier, Suffolk House to the north had been the residence of Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. It was exchanged by Henry VIII, the king giving the Duke of Suffolk in return the house of the Bishop of Norwich in St Martin’s-in-the-Fields. Suffolk House then took the name of Southwark Place and a mint was established here for the king’s use.

Later, Queen Mary I gave the mansion to Nicholas Heath, Archbishop of York. Archbishop Heath sold the premises, which were partly pulled down and many small cottages being built on the site. This estate devolved to the Lant family and Queen Anne empowered Thomas Lant to let leases for 51 years. In 1773 it was advertised to be let as seventeen acres, on which were 400 houses, with a rental of £1000 per annum. Lant Street may date form this period.

Charles Dickens lodged here in 1824 whilst his father was in the Marshalsea Prison and close by is the historic St George the Martyr church, where the Dickens character Little Dorrit was married in the eponymous book. The Marshalsea prison was located just north of the southeast end of Lant Street.

Sir Joseph Lyons was born at 50 Lant Street in 1847. Lyons went on to own the Lyons Corner Houses, a chain of tea shops established in 1887.

Much of the area became derelict as a result of air raid damage during World War II

In 1902, a small public open space, known as Little Dorrit’s Playground was established. North of Lant Street is Little Dorrit’s Court.




Main source: Survey of London
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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Comment
Peter   
Added: 4 Dec 2023 07:05 GMT   

Gambia Street, SE1
Gambia Street was previously known as William Street.

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Comment
Vic Stanley   
Added: 24 Feb 2024 17:38 GMT   

Postcose
The postcode is SE15, NOT SE1

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Wendy    
Added: 22 Mar 2024 15:33 GMT   

Polygon Buildings
Following the demolition of the Polygon, and prior to the construction of Oakshott Court in 1974, 4 tenement type blocks of flats were built on the site at Clarendon Sq/Phoenix Rd called Polygon Buildings. These were primarily for people working for the Midland Railway and subsequently British Rail. My family lived for 5 years in Block C in the 1950s. It seems that very few photos exist of these buildings.

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Steve   
Added: 19 Mar 2024 08:42 GMT   

Road construction and houses completed
New Charleville Circus road layout shown on Stanford’s Library Map Of London And Its Suburbs 1879 with access via West Hill only.

Plans showing street numbering were recorded in 1888 so we can concluded the houses in Charleville Circus were built by this date.

Source: Charleville Circus, Sydenham, London

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Comment
Steve   
Added: 19 Mar 2024 08:04 GMT   

Charleville Circus, Sydenham: One Place Study (OPS)
One Place Study’s (OPS) are a recent innovation to research and record historical facts/events/people focused on a single place �’ building, street, town etc.

I have created an open access OPS of Charleville Circus on WikiTree that has over a million members across the globe working on a single family tree for everyone to enjoy, for free, forever.

Source: Charleville Circus, Sydenham, London

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Comment
Charles   
Added: 8 Mar 2024 20:45 GMT   

My House
I want to know who lived in my house in the 1860’s.

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NH   
Added: 7 Mar 2024 11:41 GMT   

Telephone House
Donald Hunter House, formerly Telephone House, was the BT Offices closed in 2000

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Comment
Paul Cox   
Added: 5 Mar 2024 22:18 GMT   

War damage reinstatement plans of No’s 11 & 13 Aldine Street
Whilst clearing my elderly Mothers house of general detritus, I’ve come across original plans (one on acetate) of No’s 11 & 13 Aldine Street. Might they be of interest or should I just dispose of them? There are 4 copies seemingly from the one single acetate example. Seems a shame to just junk them as the level of detail is exquisite. No worries if of no interest, but thought I’d put it out there.

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Comment
Diana   
Added: 28 Feb 2024 13:52 GMT   

New Inn Yard, E1
My great grandparents x 6 lived in New Inn Yard. On this date, their son was baptised in nearby St Leonard’s Church, Shoreditch

Source: BDM London, Cripplegate and Shoreditch registers written by church clerk.

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Comment
Gillian   
Added: 17 Feb 2024 00:08 GMT   

No 36 Upper East Smithfield
My great great grandfather was born at No 36 Upper East Smithfield and spent his early years staring out at a "dead wall" of St Katharine’s Docks. His father was an outfitter and sold clothing for sailors. He describes the place as being backed by tenements in terrible condition and most of the people living there were Irish.

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LOCAL PHOTOS
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Postal area SE1
TUM image id: 1483541461
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
TUM image id: 1557142131
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Postal area SE1
Licence: CC BY 2.0


View from the roof of the Elephant and Castle pub. The pub gave its name to the area
Licence:


Hopton’s Almshouses, Hopton Street, Bankside (1957)
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Wagstaff Buildings, Sumner Road, Bankside, c. 1920.
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Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Tate Modern viewed from Thames pleasure boat (2003)
Credit: Christine Matthews
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Southwark Cathedral
Credit: IG/aleks london diary
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Trocadero, Elephant and Castle. Opened in 1930 and demolished in 1963.
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The George Inn (1889) On Borough High Street and once known as the George and Dragon, the pub is the only surviving galleried London coaching inn.
Credit: National Trust
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Anchor Terrace, SE1 A large symmetrical building on Southwark Bridge Road, Anchor Terrace was built in 1834 for senior employees of the nearby Anchor Brewery. The building was converted into luxury flats in the late 1990s.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Jwslubbock
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