Westbourne Lodge

Image dated 1857.

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MAP YEAR:175018001810182018301860190019502024 
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Photo taken in a westerly direction · * · W2 ·
JUNE
22
2015
Westbourne Lodge appeared in one of the earliest photographs in London.

Westbourne Lodge was built before the Great Western Railway was built but once it had, the railway ran beside the Lodge.

The accompanying photo dates from 6 August 1857 and shows guests at the wedding of the Reverend Frederick Manners Stopford to Florence Augusta Saunders, daughter of Charles Saunders, first general secretary of the Great Western Railway. Isambard Kingdom Brunel was amongst the guests.

During the wedding, both Brunel and Saunders were able to experience trains running beside the wedding party along the railway which they had built.
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Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 22 Aug 2023 12:31 GMT   

Hampden Street, W2
My great great grandparents William and Hannah Playford lived at 60 Hampden Street from the mid 1880s when they moved from rural poverty in Norfolk to inner city hardship in Paddington and where all their children were born. My great grandfather was a road sweeper and sold cat meat. They had seven children in all, of whom five survived infancy: three boys who all volunteered for the army at the outbreak of WW1 and miraculously returned via Salonika, France and a German POW camp; and two daughters, the eldest of whom was my great grandmother, Annie Playford b 1888. She had an illegitimate daughter in 1910, my grandmother Hilda Sarah Catherine. She brought her up singlehandedly and assumed a false married name to conceal her (then socially unacceptable) status as a single mother. In fact she never married and would never tell my grandmother anything about her father. Because of her longevity (she died in 1986) I remember Annie very well. As a child I perceived her as grumpy, uncommunicative, unsocial and a voracious eater. Of course as an adult I realised this was borne from pride loneliness, ill health, a grim determination to survive, and hunger. Somehow she did survive on her own as a single parent, despite lack of family support and serious deprivation. She worked three back breaking menial cleaning jobs over many years to make ends meet. With the advent of DNA I now know the identity of my grandmother’s father which she always dearly wished to know herself. She used to ask her mother if she loved her. The answer: "I kept you, didn’t I?" In the context of the times, I think that says it all. I only wish nanny was still here so that I could tell her all about her father.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


   
Added: 7 Jul 2024 16:26 GMT   

Haycroft Gardens, NW10
My Grandfather bought No 45 Buchanan Gdns in I believe 1902 and died ther in the early 1950s

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 7 Jul 2024 16:20 GMT   

Haycroft Gardens, NW10
I lived in No 7 from 1933 to 1938

Reply

Sylvia guiver   
Added: 4 Jul 2024 14:52 GMT   

Grandparents 1937 lived 37 Blandford Square
Y mother and all her sisters and brother lived there, before this date , my parent wedding photographers were take in the square, I use to visit with my mother I remember the barge ballon in the square in the war.

Reply
Born here
Roy Mathieson   
Added: 27 Jun 2024 16:25 GMT   

St Saviours
My great grandmother was born in Bowling Green Lane in 1848. The family moved from there to Earl Terrace, Bermondsey in 1849. I have never been able to locate Earl Terrace on maps.

Reply

   
Added: 26 Jun 2024 13:10 GMT   

Buckhurst Street, E1
Mt grandfather, Thomas Walton Ward had a musical instrument workshop in Buckhurst Street from 1934 until the street was bombed during the war. Grandfather was a partner in the musical instrument firm of R.J. Ward and Sons of Liverpool. He died in 1945 and is buried in a common grave at Abney Park Cemetery.

Reply
Lived here
Mike Dowling   
Added: 15 Jun 2024 15:51 GMT   

Family ties (1936 - 1963)
The Dowling family lived at number 13 Undercliffe Road for
Nearly 26 years. Next door was the Harris family

Reply
Comment
Evie Helen   
Added: 13 Jun 2024 00:03 GMT   

Vickers Road
The road ’Vickers Road’ is numbered rather differently to other roads in the area as it was originally built as housing for the "Vickers" arms factory in the late 1800’s and early 1900s. Most of the houses still retain the original 19th century tiling and drainage outside of the front doors.

Reply

Paul Harris    
Added: 12 Jun 2024 12:54 GMT   

Ellen Place, E1
My mother’s father and his family lived at 31 Ellen Place London E1 have a copy of the 1911 census showing this

Reply



LOCAL PHOTOS
Click here to see map view of nearby Creative Commons images
Click here to see Creative Commons images near to this postcode
Notting Hill
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Licence: CC BY 2.0
Pembridge Road (1900s)
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The Bayswater Conduit in 1798.
TUM image id: 1490459429
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Bayswater Road
TUM image id: 1552860722
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Chilworth Street, W2
TUM image id: 1483806751
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Mrs Siddons’ house at Westbourne Green c. 1800
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The Bayswater Conduit in 1798.
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The Royal Oak pub in Bayswater gave its name to the nearby station
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Bourne Terrace - taken from Torquay Street. On the corner of Bourne Terrace is Saws Ltd at number 264 along with various blocks which no longer exist.
Credit: Bernard Selwwyn
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Junction of Cirencester Street, W2 Cirencester Street was curtailed when the post-war Warwick Estate was built
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Lord Hills Road at the junction with Senior Street
Credit: Historic England
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Sutherland Avenue, W9
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Little Venice (1952) This is one of a large series of London views that Stephen Bone executed from the 1930s to the 1950s. Bone liked to paint water and its reflections, and often combined this with compositions showing people going about their daily business, a combination which is the subject of this picture. A barge, hung with its owner’s washing, travels along the canal. Two children play along the banks, and a man sits on the railings overhead, enjoying the view.
Credit: Stephen Bone
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Westbourne Terrace Road bridge - the northern end of Westbourne Terrace Road Through the bridge, and some 13 miles (but no locks) later, you will arrive at Bulls Bridge Junction on the Grand Union main line.
Credit: IG/NeilClifton
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Paddington Public Baths on Queens Road (now Queensway) in 1909. Paddington’s first public baths which were built in 1874 but demolished in 1911 to be replaced by Whiteley’s new building when the store relocated from Westbourne Grove.
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