Vernon Yard, W11

Road in/near Notting Hill, existing between 1853 and now.

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(51.51386 -0.20403, 51.513 -0.204) 
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Road · * · W11 ·
August
21
2022
Vernon Yard is a mews off of Portobello Road.

The name Portobello Road derived from the 1739 capture of Puerto Bello in Central America from the Spaniards by Admiral Vernon (1684-1757) with only six ships.

Vernon Yard is similarly named - it was known as Vernon Mews until 1932. It is a small L-shaped mews with its entrance under an archway between 117 and 119 Portobello Road. The terrace of houses in Portobello Road that backs onto the mews was originally called Vernon Terrace, and the mews served these houses.

Vernon Yard would have been built at the same time as Vernon Terrace, in the first half of the 1850s. The 1863 Ordnance Survey map shows two numbered units (Nos. 1 and 2) at the southern end of Vernon Yard; a further eight units (Nos. 3-10) along the western side) and one (No. 11) at the northern end. These were almost certainly stable blocks with accommodation above. On the eastern side, the map shows a number of unnumbered units which were probably warehouses or stabling belonging to the adjoining Portobello Road houses.

The 1871 census shows only three families living in the mews – a labourer and laundress with seven children at No. 7; a coachman at No. 9; and a carman at No. 11. The 1901 census shows only two families, at Nos. 9 and 11 (the heads of family being respectively a carman and a general dealer), and there is a note to say that “all other stabling in Vernon Mews has been converted into hay and store storage”.

The buildings in Vernon Yard continued to be largely used as warehousing or garages until the 1960s. In 1964, there was only one resident, living in a small flat above a garage at No. 1. Planning documents described the mews as “a mixture of dilapidated 2-storey properties which are used for storage purposes. Nos. 5, 6 and 7 are a builder’s store and workshop. … Nos. 2 and 3 were recently used in part as a wholesale grocery store, but have otherwise been used as a corn merchants”. The builder at Nos. 5, 6 and 7 was S. Nash and Son, who moved there when their lease of the premises that they had occupied 100 Kensington Park Road for the previous 90 years came to an end in 1967 (it is now part of Waterford House). They remained there until about 1990 and were presumably responsible for remodelling the premises to form the present striking building.

Text courtesy of Elaine Spencer Hopkins.

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Main source: Old Notting Hill/North Ken History
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:39 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner lived at 24 Elgin Crescent

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Ken Herlingshaw   
Added: 17 Jun 2023 18:34 GMT   

St John the Evangelist - Spire
The top of the church spire fell off during WW2 (presumably during a bombing raid ?) and for many years after that the spire had a flat top.
I don’t know when it was restored.
Definitely not in the early fifties when I went to Sunday School there.

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Comment
Ken Herlingshaw   
Added: 17 Jun 2023 18:35 GMT   

Clarendon Road - post WW2
I used to live at 62 Clarendon Road, from about 1947 to 1956.
It was one of four prefabs on the site, numbers 60, 60A, 62 and 62A.
The original building there (on the corner with Lansdowne Rise) was bombed during WW2.
Prefabs weren’t very popular with the up-market Kensington Borough councillors, however, and at the earliest opportunity they were demolished and we were moved to Henry Dickens Court.
We inherited a telephone line from the original occupier, a band leader, when we moved into the prefab and the phone number was BAYswater 0050. But we didn’t know anybody else with a phone to call.

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mh   
Added: 21 Jun 2023 12:15 GMT   

Clarendon Road, W11
Interesting....

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Christian   
Added: 31 Oct 2023 10:34 GMT   

Cornwall Road, W11
Photo shows William Richard Hoare’s chemist shop at 121 Cornwall Road.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Mike Dowling   
Added: 15 Jun 2024 15:51 GMT   

Family ties (1936 - 1963)
The Dowling family lived at number 13 Undercliffe Road for
Nearly 26 years. Next door was the Harris family

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Evie Helen   
Added: 13 Jun 2024 00:03 GMT   

Vickers Road
The road ’Vickers Road’ is numbered rather differently to other roads in the area as it was originally built as housing for the "Vickers" arms factory in the late 1800’s and early 1900s. Most of the houses still retain the original 19th century tiling and drainage outside of the front doors.

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Paul Harris    
Added: 12 Jun 2024 12:54 GMT   

Ellen Place, E1
My mother’s father and his family lived at 31 Ellen Place London E1 have a copy of the 1911 census showing this

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Comment
   
Added: 10 Jun 2024 19:31 GMT   

Toll gate Close
Did anyone live at Toll Gate Close, which was built in the area where the baths had been?

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Charles Black   
Added: 24 May 2024 12:54 GMT   

Middle Row, W10
Middle Row was notable for its bus garage, home of the number 7.

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Comment
   
Added: 2 May 2024 16:14 GMT   

Farm Place, W8
The previous name of Farm Place was Ernest St (no A)

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Tony Whipple   
Added: 16 Apr 2024 21:35 GMT   

Frank Whipple Place, E14
Frank was my great-uncle, I’d often be ’babysat’ by Peggy while Nan and Dad went to the pub. Peggy was a marvel, so full of life. My Dad and Frank didn’t agree on most politics but everyone in the family is proud of him. A genuinely nice, knowledgable bloke. One of a kind.

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Theresa Penney   
Added: 16 Apr 2024 18:08 GMT   

1 Whites Row
My 2 x great grandparents and his family lived here according to the 1841 census. They were Dutch Ashkenazi Jews born in Amsterdam at the beginning of the 19th century but all their children were born in Spitalfields.

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LOCAL PHOTOS
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Coronation street party, 1953.
TUM image id: 1545250697
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Notting Hill
TUM image id: 1510169244
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Pembridge Road (1900s)
TUM image id: 1556889569
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Kensington Park Hotel
TUM image id: 1453375720
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Chesterton Road, W10
TUM image id: 1563717983
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Children of Ruston Close This road was the renaming of Rillington Place. Even after renaming, this street, where notorious murders had taken place, proved too much to avoid subsequent demolition.
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The Tile Kiln, Notting Dale (1824)
Credit: Florence Gladstone
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Pembridge Road (1900s)
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Kensington Park Hotel
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The Tabernacle is a Grade II*-listed building in Powis Square, W11 built in 1887 as a church. Photographed here in 2010.
Credit: Asteuartw
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Duke of Cornwall, Ledbury Road W11, around 1990. Later the Ledbury restaurant, holder of two Michelin Stars
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St Peter's Notting Hill
Credit: Asteuartw
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Kensington Hippodrome, about 1840, showing St John’s Hill in the background.
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SARM Studios, a recording studio, was established by Chris Blackwell, the founder of Island Records. They were originally known as Basing Street Studios. It has also been known in the past as Island Studios. SARM is an aconym of Sound and Recording Mobiles. At the studios, built inside a former church that had been deconsecrated, Blackwell recorded a number of artists there for Island Records, such as Iron Maiden, Bob Marley, Steve Winwood, Free, Bad Company, Robert Palmer, Jimmy Cliff, Nick Drake, Fairport Convention, King Crimson, John Martyn, Mott the Hoople, Quintessence, Roxy Music, Brian Eno, Sparks, Cat Stevens, Spooky Tooth, Traffic, If, Jethro Tull, the Average White Band, and the Sensational Alex Harvey Band.
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Arundel Gardens
Credit: Barbara Avis
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