Geffrye Museum

Museum in/near Hoxton, existing between 1914 and now.

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Museum · * · ·
October
29
2013
Founded in 1914, the Geffrye Museum is a museum specialising in the history of the English domestic interior.

Named after Sir Robert Geffrye, former Lord Mayor of London and Master of the Ironmongers' Company, it is located on Kingsland Road in London. The main body of the museum is housed in the Grade I-listed almshouses of the Ironmongers' Company, built in 1714 at the bequest of Geffrye. The museum was extended in 1998 with an innovative yet architecturally sympathetic new wing designed by Branson Coates Architects.

The museum shows the changing style of the English domestic interior in a series of eleven displayed period rooms from 1600 to the present day. The emphasis is on the furnishings, pictures and ornaments of the urban middle classes of London.

The museum routinely holds exhibitions and seminars both in the museum itself and its walled herb garden. An annual exhibition of note is the 'Christmas Past' exhibit which sees each period room adorned as it would have been during the Christmas period.

In addition the museum has an eighteenth-century alms house as part of the display, showing the building in its original guise as a rest home for the poor.

In 2011 the Geffrye secured funding of £13.2 million from the Heritage Lottery Fund to build an extension to the museum, opening in 2015.

Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Marion James   
Added: 12 Mar 2021 17:43 GMT   

26 Edith Street Haggerston
On Monday 11th October 1880 Charlotte Alice Haynes was born at 26 Edith Street Haggerston the home address of her parents her father Francis Haynes a Gilder by trade and her mother Charlotte Alice Haynes and her two older siblings Francis & George who all welcomed the new born baby girl into the world as they lived in part of the small Victorian terraced house which was shared by another family had an outlook view onto the world of the Imperial Gas Works site - a very grey drab reality of the life they were living as an East End working class family - 26 Edith Street no longer stands in 2021 - the small rundown polluted terrace houses of Edith Street are long since gone along with the Gas Companies buildings to be replaced with green open parkland that is popular in 21st century by the trendy residents of today - Charlotte Alice Haynes (1880-1973) is the wife of my Great Grand Uncle Henry Pickett (1878-1930) As I research my family history I slowly begin to understand the life my descendants had to live and the hardships that they went through to survive - London is my home and there are many areas of this great city I find many of my descendants living working and dying in - I am yet to find the golden chalice! But in all truthfulness my family history is so much more than hobby its an understanding of who I am as I gather their stories. Did Charlotte Alice Pickett nee Haynes go on to live a wonderful life - no I do not think so as she became a widow in 1930 worked in a canteen and never remarried living her life in and around Haggerston & Hackney until her death in 1973 with her final resting place at Manor Park Cemetery - I think Charlotte most likely excepted her lot in life like many women from her day, having been born in the Victorian era where the woman had less choice and standing in society, which is a sad state of affairs - So I will endeavour to write about Charlotte and the many other women in my family history to give them the voice of a life they so richly deserve to be recorded !

Edith Street was well situated for the new public transport of two railway stations in 1880 :- Haggerston Railway Station opened in 1867 & Cambridge Heath Railway Station opened in 1872


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Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

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STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Vic Stanley   
Added: 24 Feb 2024 17:38 GMT   

Postcose
The postcode is SE15, NOT SE1

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Gillian   
Added: 17 Feb 2024 00:08 GMT   

No 36 Upper East Smithfield
My great great grandfather was born at No 36 Upper East Smithfield and spent his early years staring out at a "dead wall" of St Katharine’s Docks. His father was an outfitter and sold clothing for sailors. He describes the place as being backed by tenements in terrible condition and most of the people living there were Irish.

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Kevin Pont   
Added: 16 Feb 2024 20:32 GMT   

Name origin
Interestingly South Lambeth derives its name from the same source as Lambeth itself - a landing place for lambs.

But South Lambeth has no landing place - it is not on the River Thames

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C Hobbs   
Added: 31 Jan 2024 23:53 GMT   

George Gut (1853 - 1861)
George Gut, Master Baker lived with his family in Long Lane.
George was born in Bernbach, Hesse, Germany and came to the UK sometime in the 1840s. In 1849, George married an Englishwoman called Matilda Baker and became a nauralized Englishman. He was given the Freedom of the City of London (by Redemption in the Company of Bakers), in 1853 and was at that time, recorded as living at 3 Long Lane. In the 1861 census, George Gut was living at 11 Long Lane.

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Emma Beach   
Added: 18 Jan 2024 04:33 GMT   

William Sutton Thwaites
William Sutton Thwaites was the father of Frances Lydia Alice Knorr nee Thwaites�’�’she was executed in 1894 in Melbourne, Victoria Australia for infanticide. In the year prior to his marriage, to her mother Frances Jeanette Thwaites nee Robin, William Sutton was working as a tailor for Mr Orchard who employed four tailors in the hamlet of Mile End Old Town on at Crombies Row, Commercial Road East.

Source: 1861 England Census Class: Rg 9; Piece: 293; Folio: 20; Page: 2; GSU roll: 542608

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Comment
Simon   
Added: 15 Jan 2024 15:44 GMT   

Simon De Charmes, clockmaker
De Charmes (or Des Charmes), Simon, of French Huguenot extraction. Recorded 1688 and Free of the Clockmakers’ Company 1691-1730. In London until 1704 at least at ’his House, the Sign of the Clock, the Corner of Warwick St, Charing Cross’. See Brian Loomes The Early Clockmakers of Great Britain, NAG Press, 1981, p.188

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Born here
Jacqueline Mico   
Added: 14 Jan 2024 07:29 GMT   

Robert Bolam
This is where my grandad was born, he went on to be a beautiful man, he became a shop owner, a father, and grandfather, he lost a leg when he was a milkman and the horse kicked him, then opened a shop in New Cross and then moved to Lewisham where he had a Newsagents and tobacconists.

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Tom Hughes   
Added: 5 Jan 2024 14:11 GMT   

4 Edwardes Terrace
In 1871, Mrs. Blake, widow of Gen. Blake, died in her home at 4 Edwardes Terrace, leaving a fortune of 140,000 pounds, something like 20 million quid today. She left no will. The exact fortune may have been exaggerated but for years claimants sought their share of the "Blake millions" which eventually went to "the Crown."

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Hoxton

Hoxton is a district in the East End of London, immediately north of the financial district of the City of London.

Hogesdon is first recorded in the Domesday Book, meaning an Anglo-Saxon farm belonging to 'Hoch', or 'Hocq'. Little is recorded of the origins of the settlement, though there was Roman activity around Ermine Street, which ran to the east of the area from the 1st century. In medieval times, Hoxton formed a rural part of Shoreditch parish.

In 1415, the Lord Mayor of London caused the wall of the City to be broken towards Moorfields, and built the postern called Moorgate, for the ease of the citizens to walk that way upon causeways towards Islington and Hoxton – at that time, still marshy areas. The residents responded by harassing walkers to protect their fields. A century later, the hedges and ditches were destroyed, by order of the City, to enable City dwellers to partake in leisure at Hoxton.

By Tudor times many moated manor houses existed to provide ambassadors and courtiers country air nearby the City. The open fields to the north and west were frequently used for archery practice, and on 22 September 1598 the playwright Ben Jonson fought a fatal duel in Hoxton Fields, killing actor Gabriel Spencer. Jonson was able to prove his literacy, thereby claiming benefit of clergy to escape a hanging.

On 26 October 1605 Hoxton achieved notoriety, when a letter arrived at the home of local resident William Parker, Lord Monteagle warning him not to attend the Parliament summoned by James I to convene on 5 November, because "yet I say they shall receive a terrible blow, the Parliament, and yet they shall not see who hurts them". The letter may have been sent by his brother-in-law Francis Tresham, or he may have written it himself, to curry favour. The letter was read aloud at supper, before prominent Catholics, and then he delivered it personally to Robert Cecil at Whitehall. While the conspirators were alerted, by the public reading, to the existence of the letter they persevered with their plot as their gunpowder remained undiscovered. William Parker accompanied Thomas Howard, the Lord Chamberlain, at his visit to the undercroft of Parliament, where Guy Fawkes was found in the early hours of 5 November. Most of the conspirators fled on the discovery of the Gunpowder Plot, but Francis Tresham was arrested a few days later at his house in Hoxton.

By the end of the 17th century the nobility's estates began to be broken up. Many of these large houses became to be used as schools, hospitals or mad houses, with almshouses being built on the land between by benefactors, most of whom were City liverymen. Aske's Almshouses were built on Pitfield Street in 1689 from Robert Aske's endowment for 20 poor haberdashers and a school for 20 children of freemen. Hoxton House, was established as a private asylum in 1695. It was owned by the Miles family, and expanded rapidly into the surrounding streets being described by Coleridge as the Hoxton madhouse. Here fee-paying 'gentle and middle class' people took their exercise in the extensive grounds between Pitfield Street and Kingsland Road;[14] including the poet Charles Lamb. Over 500 pauper lunatics resided in closed wards, and it remained the Naval Lunatic Asylum until 1818. The asylum closed in 1911; and the only remains are by Hackney Community College, where a part of the house was incorporated into the school that replaced it in 1921. At this time Hoxton Square and Charles Square were laid out, forming a fashionable area. Non-conformist sects were attracted to the area, away from the restrictions of the City's regulations.

In the Victorian era the railways made travelling to distant suburbs easier, and this combined with infill building and industrialisation to drive away the wealthier classes, leaving Hoxton a concentration of the poor with many slums. The area became a centre for the furniture trade.

Manufacturing developments in the years after the Second World War meant that many of the small industries that characterised Hoxton moved out. By the early 1980s, these industrial lofts and buildings came to be occupied by young artists as inexpensive live/work spaces, while exhibitions, raves and clubs occupied former office and retail space at the beginning of the 1990s. During this time Joshua Compston established his Factual Nonsense gallery on Charlotte Road in Shoreditch and organised art fetes in Hoxton Square. Their presence gradually drew other creative industries into the area, especially magazines, design firms, and dot-coms.

By the end of the 20th century, the southern half of Hoxton had become a vibrant arts and entertainment district boasting a large number of bars, nightclubs, restaurants, and art galleries.

The northern half of the district is more residential and consists largely of council housing estates and new-build private residences.

Hoxton railway station is in the Hoxton district of the London Borough of Hackney. The station is located on the Kingsland Viaduct and is served by London Overground trains on the extended East London Line, under the control of the London Rail division of Transport for London. The station is situated at the back of the Geffrye Museum and is on Geffrye Street near to Dunloe Street and Cremer Street.

The station was officially opened to the public on 27 April 2010, initially with week-day services running between Dalston Junction and New Cross or New Cross Gate. On 23 May 2010 services were extended from New Cross Gate to West Croydon or Crystal Palace.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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In the neighbourhood...

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Colville Estate, Shoreditch (2019) The Colville Estate is situated between the Regents Canal to the North and Shoreditch Park to the South. It was designed in the early 1950s by Shoreditch Metropolitan Borough Council and since 2009 has undergone ’regeneration’.
Credit: Municipal Dreams
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The Gibraltar Tavern in Gibraltar Walk, Bethnal Green. This pub was present before 1750. The post-war Avebury Estate was extended in 1963. The pub disappeared under the site for the block called Cadogan House.
Credit: (Sourced by) Charlie Goodwin
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Crondall Street is one of the older streets of the Somers Town area. As Gloucester Street it had already appeared on Rocque’s 1750s map. By the time of the 1830 map, New Gloucester Street extended it westwards. The NW1 area has many other examples of this building style.
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Gibraltar Walk, E2 The photo depicts a section of Gibraltar Walk which fell victim to post-war planners.
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Butcher, Hoxton St, Shoreditch (c.1910)
Credit: Bishopsgate Institute
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Whitechapel High Street near Aldgate (1929)
Credit: Fox Photos/Getty Images
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Pitfield Street (1896)
Old London postcard
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William Brandon and his mineral water business, 112 Virginia Road, Bethnal Green c.1887
Credit: the gentle author
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Pre-electric irons These would be heated on a stove or an open fire. Apart from there use ironing, wrapped in woollen stuff they were frequently used as substitute hot water bottles.
Credit: Wiki Commons
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Ely Place dates from the 1860s but the name dates from 1669. On 11 November 1651, property owner Thomas Robinson sold a portion of his land to one Francis Kirkman. It was described as a "parcel of ground 34 feet wide and from 74 to 84 feet long (...) and the entry way from Hoxton Street between the houses, and a garden plot of one acre extending eastwards to Kingsland Highway". In 1665, the Joiners’ Company purchased an estate at Hoxton and in 1669, sold it on to the overseers of the poor of the Liberty of Saffron Hill, Hatton Garden and Ely Rents. This forms the basis for Ely Place and the land to its north (part of which was developed into the Shoreditch Workhouse). Obliterated during Second World War bombing, 1974 saw an area including Lynedoch Street and Ely Place redeveloped.
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