Ethelburga Street, SW11

Road in/near Battersea, existing between 1871 and now.

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Road · * · SW11 ·
APRIL
5
2021
Ethelburga Street was named after Saint Æthelburh (Ethelburga), founder and first Abbess of Barking.

Ethelburga was the sister of Earconwald, Bishop of London. Earconwold founded a double monastery at Barking for his sister, and a monastery at Chertsey for himself. Barking appears to have already been established by the time of the plague in 664 AD.

Ethelburga had been at some time based in a manor which was sited in what became Battersea Park near to Albert Bridge Road.

Before Battersea Bridge was built around 1771, the area contained scattered houses, lanes and tracks. Once lane which then stretched right across the modern Battersea Park was Marsh Lane. The section across the park disappeared but the remainder of Marsh Lane was made into Ethelburga Street in 1871. At the time, the street stretched from Battersea Bridge Road to Albert Bridge Road.

A house called Park House (now demolished) was built in 1873 at the (north) corner of Ethelburga Street and Battersea Bridge Road for Benjamin Cooke, a builder who built a lot of Battersea.

In 1875, Nevil House and Nevil Villa were built by builder John Roberts on the south corner of Ethelburga Street where it met Albert Bridge Road for John Nevil Maskelyne, a watchmaker turned stage magician, who specialised in exposing fraudulent spiritualists. Nevil House was considerably extended in 1879 for Maskelyne who later had a local street named after him.

However, solid Victorian housing was the main stay of Ethelburga Street.

The area suffered enormously during the Blitz with much of the area around Ethelburga Street and Bolan Street destroyed. About eighty prefabs were built in this area and then in the early 1960s, a larger area was cleared to make way for the London County Council’s Ethelburga Estate. The subsequent naming of the blocks and internal roads held local significance: Jagger House, and Henty and Maskelyne Closes were called after famous Battersea residents; Watford Close after Watford Villas, and Searles House after Searle Street, obliterated by the development.

Along with the new building, the line of Ethelburga Street was dramatically altered by the new estate after the turn of the 1960s - formerly the street had cut east-west separating Rosenau Road and Worfield Street from each other, ending at Albert Bridge Road.




Main source: Bartlett Architecture: Battersea Park
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963�’65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Wendy    
Added: 22 Mar 2024 15:33 GMT   

Polygon Buildings
Following the demolition of the Polygon, and prior to the construction of Oakshott Court in 1974, 4 tenement type blocks of flats were built on the site at Clarendon Sq/Phoenix Rd called Polygon Buildings. These were primarily for people working for the Midland Railway and subsequently British Rail. My family lived for 5 years in Block C in the 1950s. It seems that very few photos exist of these buildings.

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Steve   
Added: 19 Mar 2024 08:42 GMT   

Road construction and houses completed
New Charleville Circus road layout shown on Stanford’s Library Map Of London And Its Suburbs 1879 with access via West Hill only.

Plans showing street numbering were recorded in 1888 so we can concluded the houses in Charleville Circus were built by this date.

Source: Charleville Circus, Sydenham, London

Reply
Comment
Steve   
Added: 19 Mar 2024 08:04 GMT   

Charleville Circus, Sydenham: One Place Study (OPS)
One Place Study’s (OPS) are a recent innovation to research and record historical facts/events/people focused on a single place �’ building, street, town etc.

I have created an open access OPS of Charleville Circus on WikiTree that has over a million members across the globe working on a single family tree for everyone to enjoy, for free, forever.

Source: Charleville Circus, Sydenham, London

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Comment
Charles   
Added: 8 Mar 2024 20:45 GMT   

My House
I want to know who lived in my house in the 1860’s.

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NH   
Added: 7 Mar 2024 11:41 GMT   

Telephone House
Donald Hunter House, formerly Telephone House, was the BT Offices closed in 2000

Reply
Comment
Paul Cox   
Added: 5 Mar 2024 22:18 GMT   

War damage reinstatement plans of No’s 11 & 13 Aldine Street
Whilst clearing my elderly Mothers house of general detritus, I’ve come across original plans (one on acetate) of No’s 11 & 13 Aldine Street. Might they be of interest or should I just dispose of them? There are 4 copies seemingly from the one single acetate example. Seems a shame to just junk them as the level of detail is exquisite. No worries if of no interest, but thought I’d put it out there.

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Comment
Diana   
Added: 28 Feb 2024 13:52 GMT   

New Inn Yard, E1
My great grandparents x 6 lived in New Inn Yard. On this date, their son was baptised in nearby St Leonard’s Church, Shoreditch

Source: BDM London, Cripplegate and Shoreditch registers written by church clerk.

Reply
Comment
Vic Stanley   
Added: 24 Feb 2024 17:38 GMT   

Postcose
The postcode is SE15, NOT SE1

Reply



LOCAL PHOTOS
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Elm Park Gardens
TUM image id: 1573064988
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Badric Road, SW11 (1950s)
TUM image id: 1647278035
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Petworth Street sign
TUM image id: 1493989872
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Albert Bridge opened in 1873 and was immediately designated as a dangerous structure. It was noticed early on that vibrations could threaten the structural integrity of the bridge.
Credit: The Underground Map
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Battersea Bridge (1860s) James Hedderly was a photographer active in Chelsea before the building of the Embankment and afterwards. This is a view taken from the tower of Chelsea Old Church. It shows the tangle of closely-packed houses and wharves between Cheyne Walk and Beaufort Street before the embankment. Beyond are the larger houses of Lindsey Row and the trees of Cremorne Gardens.
Credit: James Hedderly
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The Fascination of Chelsea
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Battersea High Street
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Badric Road, SW11 (1950s)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Rowena Crescent
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Winders Road
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Rosenau Road, SW11 Schloss Rosenau is a castle, formerly in Saxe-Coburg, now lying in Bavaria. Schloss Rosenau was the boyhood home of Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, who became the husband of Queen Victoria. Due to the name of nearby Albert Bridge, builders rook the opportunity to call many of the roads of this area of Battersea after connections with the Prince Consort.
Credit: The Underground Map
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Petworth Street sign
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Old Battersea Bridge, Walter Greaves (oil on canvas, 1874) Old Battersea Bridge, seen from upstream, on Lindsey Row (now Cheyne Walk), with Battersea on the far shore. The boatyard belonging to the Greaves family is in the foreground. On the extreme left is the wall surrounding the garden of the artist William Bell Scott. In the far distance Crystal Palace is just visible. Battersea Bridge was demolished in 1881, and replaced with the present bridge. Before the alterations Greaves recalled the danger to shipping and the difficulty of steering through the arches unless the ‘set of the tide was known’. On the horizon, Crystal Palace can be seen
Credit: Tate Gallery
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