Denny Crescent, SE11

Road in/near Lambeth, existing between 1925 and now.

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(51.48987 -0.10977, 51.489 -0.109) 
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Road · * · SE11 ·
FEBRUARY
11
2019
Denny Crescent was built as part of a small estate by the Duchy of Cornwall in 1925.




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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

Reply

Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   

Hurley Road, SE11
There were stables in the road mid way - also Danny reading had a coal delivery lorry.

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Comment
Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   

Saunders Street, SE11
I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

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Reply
   
Added: 17 Dec 2023 21:57 GMT   

Hurley Road, SE11
I remember Danny reading we lived opposite him at number 15 he used to give us rides in his lorry and a bottle of cola if he was carrying it on the lorry x


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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Vic Stanley   
Added: 24 Feb 2024 17:38 GMT   

Postcose
The postcode is SE15, NOT SE1

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Comment
Gillian   
Added: 17 Feb 2024 00:08 GMT   

No 36 Upper East Smithfield
My great great grandfather was born at No 36 Upper East Smithfield and spent his early years staring out at a "dead wall" of St Katharine’s Docks. His father was an outfitter and sold clothing for sailors. He describes the place as being backed by tenements in terrible condition and most of the people living there were Irish.

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Kevin Pont   
Added: 16 Feb 2024 20:32 GMT   

Name origin
Interestingly South Lambeth derives its name from the same source as Lambeth itself - a landing place for lambs.

But South Lambeth has no landing place - it is not on the River Thames

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C Hobbs   
Added: 31 Jan 2024 23:53 GMT   

George Gut (1853 - 1861)
George Gut, Master Baker lived with his family in Long Lane.
George was born in Bernbach, Hesse, Germany and came to the UK sometime in the 1840s. In 1849, George married an Englishwoman called Matilda Baker and became a nauralized Englishman. He was given the Freedom of the City of London (by Redemption in the Company of Bakers), in 1853 and was at that time, recorded as living at 3 Long Lane. In the 1861 census, George Gut was living at 11 Long Lane.

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Comment
Emma Beach   
Added: 18 Jan 2024 04:33 GMT   

William Sutton Thwaites
William Sutton Thwaites was the father of Frances Lydia Alice Knorr nee Thwaites�’�’she was executed in 1894 in Melbourne, Victoria Australia for infanticide. In the year prior to his marriage, to her mother Frances Jeanette Thwaites nee Robin, William Sutton was working as a tailor for Mr Orchard who employed four tailors in the hamlet of Mile End Old Town on at Crombies Row, Commercial Road East.

Source: 1861 England Census Class: Rg 9; Piece: 293; Folio: 20; Page: 2; GSU roll: 542608

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Comment
Simon   
Added: 15 Jan 2024 15:44 GMT   

Simon De Charmes, clockmaker
De Charmes (or Des Charmes), Simon, of French Huguenot extraction. Recorded 1688 and Free of the Clockmakers’ Company 1691-1730. In London until 1704 at least at ’his House, the Sign of the Clock, the Corner of Warwick St, Charing Cross’. See Brian Loomes The Early Clockmakers of Great Britain, NAG Press, 1981, p.188

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Born here
Jacqueline Mico   
Added: 14 Jan 2024 07:29 GMT   

Robert Bolam
This is where my grandad was born, he went on to be a beautiful man, he became a shop owner, a father, and grandfather, he lost a leg when he was a milkman and the horse kicked him, then opened a shop in New Cross and then moved to Lewisham where he had a Newsagents and tobacconists.

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Comment
Tom Hughes   
Added: 5 Jan 2024 14:11 GMT   

4 Edwardes Terrace
In 1871, Mrs. Blake, widow of Gen. Blake, died in her home at 4 Edwardes Terrace, leaving a fortune of 140,000 pounds, something like 20 million quid today. She left no will. The exact fortune may have been exaggerated but for years claimants sought their share of the "Blake millions" which eventually went to "the Crown."

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Lambeth

The ’Lamb’ in Lambeth really means just that.

The name is recorded in 1062 as Lambehitha, meaning ’landing place for lambs’, and in 1255 as Lambeth. The name refers to a harbour where lambs were either shipped from or to. It is formed from the Old English ’lamb’ and ’hythe.

South Lambeth is recorded as Sutlamehethe in 1241 and North Lambeth is recorded in 1319 as North Lamhuth. The marshland in the area, known as Lambeth Marshe, was drained in the 18th century but is remembered in the Lower Marsh street name. Sometime after the opening of Waterloo railway station in 1848 the locality around the station and Lower Marsh became known as Waterloo.

Lambeth Palace is located opposite the Palace of Westminster. The two were linked by a horse ferry across the Thames.

Until the mid-18th Century the north of Lambeth was marshland, crossed by a number of roads raised against floods.

With the opening of Westminster Bridge in 1750, followed by the Blackfriars Bridge and Vauxhall Bridge, a number of major thoroughfares were developed through Lambeth, such as Westminster Bridge Road, Kennington Road and Camberwell New Road.

In William Blake’s epic Milton a Poem, the poet John Milton leaves Heaven and travels to Lambeth, in the form of a falling comet, and enters Blake’s foot. This allows Blake to treat the ordinary world as perceived by the five senses as a sandal formed of "precious stones and gold" that he can now wear. Blake ties the sandal and, guided by Los, walks with it into the City of Art, inspired by the spirit of poetic creativity. The poem was written between 1804 and 1810.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Elephant & Castle
TUM image id: 1683196643
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In the neighbourhood...

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The Brandon Estate, Kennington. Built for the LCC in 1957-8
Credit: Flickr/Reading Tom
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Chartist meeting, Kennington Common. Widely thought to be the earliest London photograph depicting a crowd (1848) More info: www.wcml.org.uk/about-us/timeline/kennington-common-chartist-meeting/
Credit: William Kilburn
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Shop on the corner of Brook Drive and Hayles Street (2013) This unobtrusive corner shop near Elephant and Castle was the filming location for ’Come On Eileen’ by Dexys Midnight Runners. It’s no longer a shop and - to my horror - my walk from Elephant & Castle to Lambeth North passes it at 7:24 and doesn’t note it as I found out only afterwards. Grrr https://youtu.be/R-e GEXb4M4
Credit: Wiki Commons
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Children among the rubble of a bombsite playground at Lollard Street, Lambeth (1957) Children’s rights campaigner Lady Allen of Hurtwood formed a movement for the building of playgrounds. Originally known as ‘junk’ playgrounds, they were renamed adventure playgrounds in 1953 and the movement grew.
Credit: London Borough of Lambeth
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Lambeth Telegraph Tower in 1810. At a short distance west of the Fishmongers’ Almshouses, near to West Square, on the south side of St George’s Road, formerly stood this tall boarded structure. It served for some time the purposes of a semaphore telegraph tower
Credit: Wiki Commons
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"The old man, seen Lambeth Walking at the top of one of the side-streets is a Lambeth institution. He is popular in the Walk, and there are usually a few to give him pennies." Taken from ’Life in the Lambeth Walk’, Picture Post, 31 December 1938
Credit: Picture Post
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Pelham Mission Hall, Lambeth Walk (2005). A curious building with an outside pulpit. It closed as a church sometime around 1970.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Stephen Craven
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An unnamed side street off of Fitzalan Street, Lambeth (1921)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The all-female "40 Elephants (40 Thieves)" gang were based at the Elephant & Castle. They flourished between the 1870s and 1950s. The women would arrive in the West End in chauffeur-driven vehicles. With pockets sewn into their dresses and bloomers, they would take turns shoplifting and being lookout/distracters.
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