The Grange

Large house in/near Kilburn, existed between 1843 and the 1910s.

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(51.5427 -0.1984, 51.542 -0.198) 
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Large house · * · NW6 ·
December
18
2015
The Grange was a large mansion situated on Kilburn High Road until the turn of the twentieth century.

The Peters family lived in the Grange from 1843 until its demolition.

Thomas Peters was a successful and wealthy coach builder who made coaches for Queen Victoria. The final occupant was Mrs Ada Peters, the widow of his son John Winpenny Peters. Ada died in the house on 5 February 1910.

The Grange was the last of Kilburn’s large houses. Suburban building surrounded the property, leaving the house and its extensive grounds marooned in a sea of small streets and tight terrace housing.

After Ada’s death, the land was parcelled out - much of it became Kilburn Grange Park.

Meantime the house contents were disposed of in a 50 page catalogue, and the sheer volume of goods meant the auction lasted three days.

On 12 April 1910 more than 300 items of furniture went under the hammer, followed by 600 paintings, clocks and bronzes the next day. Finally there were around 1000 items of less valuable plate, china and kitchen equipment plus all the outdoor effects such as statues, six carriages built by Peters and Sons and a Merryweather fire engine. The sale commenced each day at 1pm, and the lots were knocked down at a rapid rate.

The house was earmarked for demolition so where possible, its structural components were sold for salvage. This included the door to the billiard room, purchased by local developer and publican Richard Pincham. He installed it as the new entry to a function hall on the first floor of his Railway Hotel on West End Lane.


Main source: WEMBLEY MATTERS
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
GRaleigh   
Added: 23 Feb 2021 09:34 GMT   

Found a bug
Hi all! Thank you for your excellent site. I found an overlay bug on the junction of Glengall Road, NW6 and Hazelmere Road, NW6 on the 1950 map only. It appears when one zooms in at this junction and only on the zoom.

Cheers,
Geoff Raleigh

Source: Glengall Road, NW6

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Reply
The Underground Map   
Added: 25 Feb 2021 13:11 GMT   

Glengall Road, NW6
Thanks Geoff!

Reply

LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Wendy    
Added: 22 Mar 2024 15:33 GMT   

Polygon Buildings
Following the demolition of the Polygon, and prior to the construction of Oakshott Court in 1974, 4 tenement type blocks of flats were built on the site at Clarendon Sq/Phoenix Rd called Polygon Buildings. These were primarily for people working for the Midland Railway and subsequently British Rail. My family lived for 5 years in Block C in the 1950s. It seems that very few photos exist of these buildings.

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Steve   
Added: 19 Mar 2024 08:42 GMT   

Road construction and houses completed
New Charleville Circus road layout shown on Stanford’s Library Map Of London And Its Suburbs 1879 with access via West Hill only.

Plans showing street numbering were recorded in 1888 so we can concluded the houses in Charleville Circus were built by this date.

Source: Charleville Circus, Sydenham, London

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Comment
Steve   
Added: 19 Mar 2024 08:04 GMT   

Charleville Circus, Sydenham: One Place Study (OPS)
One Place Study’s (OPS) are a recent innovation to research and record historical facts/events/people focused on a single place �’ building, street, town etc.

I have created an open access OPS of Charleville Circus on WikiTree that has over a million members across the globe working on a single family tree for everyone to enjoy, for free, forever.

Source: Charleville Circus, Sydenham, London

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Comment
Charles   
Added: 8 Mar 2024 20:45 GMT   

My House
I want to know who lived in my house in the 1860’s.

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NH   
Added: 7 Mar 2024 11:41 GMT   

Telephone House
Donald Hunter House, formerly Telephone House, was the BT Offices closed in 2000

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Comment
Paul Cox   
Added: 5 Mar 2024 22:18 GMT   

War damage reinstatement plans of No’s 11 & 13 Aldine Street
Whilst clearing my elderly Mothers house of general detritus, I’ve come across original plans (one on acetate) of No’s 11 & 13 Aldine Street. Might they be of interest or should I just dispose of them? There are 4 copies seemingly from the one single acetate example. Seems a shame to just junk them as the level of detail is exquisite. No worries if of no interest, but thought I’d put it out there.

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Comment
Diana   
Added: 28 Feb 2024 13:52 GMT   

New Inn Yard, E1
My great grandparents x 6 lived in New Inn Yard. On this date, their son was baptised in nearby St Leonard’s Church, Shoreditch

Source: BDM London, Cripplegate and Shoreditch registers written by church clerk.

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Comment
Vic Stanley   
Added: 24 Feb 2024 17:38 GMT   

Postcose
The postcode is SE15, NOT SE1

Reply



LOCAL PHOTOS
Click here to see map view of nearby Creative Commons images
Click here to see Creative Commons images near to this postcode
The Alice House
TUM image id: 1557142437
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Victorian art work
TUM image id: 1557403841
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Eustace Hamilton Miles
TUM image id: 1557162230
Licence:
Kilburn Grange Park
TUM image id: 1453363351
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Mortimer Place, NW6
TUM image id: 1492961898
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Brondesbury Station in 1961. The view is to the northeast towards Dalston Junction and Broad Street. In the distance can be seen the overbridge carrying the Metropolitan and LNER (ex-Great Central) six lines into Baker Street and Marylebone.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Ben Brooksbank
Licence:


The Gaumont State Cinema on Kilburn High Road (2007) Designed by George Coles and commissioned and built by Phillip and Sid Hyams, the cinema opened in 1937. The Gaumont State was one of the biggest auditoria in Europe, with seating for 4004 people. The suffix ’State’ is said to come from the huge 120 feet tower, inspired by the Empire State Building in New York City.
Credit: Wiki Commons/oxyman
Licence:


Extract from the London Gazette
Credit: The London Gazette
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Remains of Kilburn Priory as it appeared in 1722 Engraved by I Quilley for "The topography and natural history of Hampstead, in the County of Middlesex" (1814) by John J. Park
Credit: I Quilley
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Kilburn Grange Park
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Houses in Dennington Park Road
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Built in the period immediately following the First World War, Grangeway NW6 is tucked into a corner of Kilburn Grange Park.
Licence:


The Brownie - a bargain at 5/-
Credit: Kodak
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Sumatra Road, West Hampstead. Houses opposite Kingdon Road.
Credit: David Hawgood
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Kilburn Park Farm
Licence: CC BY 2.0




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