King’s Arbour

Orchard in/near Heathrow, existing until 1944.

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(51.47983 -0.44921, 51.479 -0.449) 
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Orchard · * · TW6 ·
FEBRUARY
8
2022
King’s Arbour was an orchard at the junction of Bath Road and Heathrow Road.

This small orchard was founded before the 19th century and separated The Magpies from Heath Row.

In 1784, within the orchard, General William Roy mapped one end of the first baseline for measuring the distance between the Paris and Greenwich observatories, the first precise distance survey in Britain.

General Roy chose the orchard for his lines as it was near-flat, near Hounslow Heath barracks and about 15 miles from the Royal Observatory. The south/east/ end was the Hampton Poor House. Both ends were marked by vertical wooden pipes which could support flagstaffs.
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Lived here
   
Added: 19 Feb 2022 16:21 GMT   

Harmondsworth (1939 - 1965)
I lived in a house (Lostwithiel) on the Bath Road opposite the junction with Tythe Barn Lane, now a hotel site. Initially, aircraft used one of the diagonal runways directly in line with our house. I attended Sipson Primary School opposite the Three Magpies and celebrated my 21st birthday at The Peggy Bedford in 1959.

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Comment
   
Added: 30 May 2022 19:03 GMT   

The Three Magpies
Row of houses (centre) was on Heathrow Rd....Ben’s Cafe shack ( foreground ) and the Three Magpies pub (far right) were on the Bath Rd

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
   
Added: 20 Jul 2024 01:13 GMT   

Whitechapel (1980 - 1981)
Diana Lee-Gobbitt - Artist rented a room at No 1 Berner Street, Whitechapel, opposite Church Passage (Ripper territory) for one year, rent approx 3 pounds pw. Worked as Receptionist for n Indian import/export company in the Watney Markets. Owner of No 1 Berner Street was Sammy Ferrugia, Maltese Taxi company owner. The artist was shown the gambling den in Dutfield’s Yard behind the terrace houses. It was common local knowledge prostitution was high end income for those in the East End during the 1950s.

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Added: 7 Jul 2024 16:26 GMT   

Haycroft Gardens, NW10
My Grandfather bought No 45 Buchanan Gdns in I believe 1902 and died ther in the early 1950s

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Comment
   
Added: 7 Jul 2024 16:20 GMT   

Haycroft Gardens, NW10
I lived in No 7 from 1933 to 1938

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Sylvia guiver   
Added: 4 Jul 2024 14:52 GMT   

Grandparents 1937 lived 37 Blandford Square
Y mother and all her sisters and brother lived there, before this date , my parent wedding photographers were take in the square, I use to visit with my mother I remember the barge ballon in the square in the war.

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Born here
Roy Mathieson   
Added: 27 Jun 2024 16:25 GMT   

St Saviours
My great grandmother was born in Bowling Green Lane in 1848. The family moved from there to Earl Terrace, Bermondsey in 1849. I have never been able to locate Earl Terrace on maps.

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Added: 26 Jun 2024 13:10 GMT   

Buckhurst Street, E1
Mt grandfather, Thomas Walton Ward had a musical instrument workshop in Buckhurst Street from 1934 until the street was bombed during the war. Grandfather was a partner in the musical instrument firm of R.J. Ward and Sons of Liverpool. He died in 1945 and is buried in a common grave at Abney Park Cemetery.

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Lived here
Mike Dowling   
Added: 15 Jun 2024 15:51 GMT   

Family ties (1936 - 1963)
The Dowling family lived at number 13 Undercliffe Road for
Nearly 26 years. Next door was the Harris family

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Comment
Evie Helen   
Added: 13 Jun 2024 00:03 GMT   

Vickers Road
The road ’Vickers Road’ is numbered rather differently to other roads in the area as it was originally built as housing for the "Vickers" arms factory in the late 1800’s and early 1900s. Most of the houses still retain the original 19th century tiling and drainage outside of the front doors.

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LOCAL PHOTOS
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In the neighbourhood...

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Three Magpies pub on the Bath Road near Heathrow Airport. Almost opposite the Three Magpies was St Saviour’s Church opened in 1880 - later the site of the Heathrow Park Hotel.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Three Magpies, Bath Road, Heathrow can be seen on the far right. The buildings here were on Heathrow Road - which was buried under the airport runways.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Old Magpies was an old pub on the Bath Road near Heathrow, demolished in 1951.
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The Three Magpies, Bath Road, Heathrow can be seen on the far right. The buildings here were on Heathrow Road - which was buried under the airport runways.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Doghurst Cottages and the entrance to Heathrow Road behind the Three Magpies pub, Bath Road (1944)
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Heathrow Hall (1935) This was farmed by the Philp family and was demolished in 1944. It was one of the main farms of the Heathrow area. It would nowadays be located on top of the northern road tunnel into the airport.
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Heathrow Airport area (1939) We are returning to Heathrow Airport for this map which predated the complete transformation of the Heathrow area by five years. Running east-west across the top of the map is Bath Road. At the Three Magpies Inn (marked ’Inn’ beside ’The Magpies’ village), a loop of a road leads south to Heathrow village, then west to Perry Oaks and back to the Bath Road just shy of the Peggy Bedford pub (marked ’Inn’ at the split of the road at Longford). The small aerodrome south of Heathrow village was the kernel of the new London Heathrow Airport which would completely cover the map by the late 1940s. The ’w’ of the 1939 ’Heathrow’ village label is the exact site of the future central bus station.
Credit: Ordnance Survey
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