Co-ordinate near to Dartford Tunnel, Stone

Image dated 2019.

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(51.464 0.252, 51.464 0.252) 
MAP YEAR:175018001810182018301860190019502024 
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Photo/Image · * · DA1 ·
JANUARY
1
2001
A deepwater pier located at latitude: 51.464, longitude: 0.252


(78)
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Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

None so far :(
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
   
Added: 20 Jul 2024 01:13 GMT   

Whitechapel (1980 - 1981)
Diana Lee-Gobbitt - Artist rented a room at No 1 Berner Street, Whitechapel, opposite Church Passage (Ripper territory) for one year, rent approx 3 pounds pw. Worked as Receptionist for n Indian import/export company in the Watney Markets. Owner of No 1 Berner Street was Sammy Ferrugia, Maltese Taxi company owner. The artist was shown the gambling den in Dutfield’s Yard behind the terrace houses. It was common local knowledge prostitution was high end income for those in the East End during the 1950s.

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Added: 7 Jul 2024 16:26 GMT   

Haycroft Gardens, NW10
My Grandfather bought No 45 Buchanan Gdns in I believe 1902 and died ther in the early 1950s

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Comment
   
Added: 7 Jul 2024 16:20 GMT   

Haycroft Gardens, NW10
I lived in No 7 from 1933 to 1938

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Sylvia guiver   
Added: 4 Jul 2024 14:52 GMT   

Grandparents 1937 lived 37 Blandford Square
Y mother and all her sisters and brother lived there, before this date , my parent wedding photographers were take in the square, I use to visit with my mother I remember the barge ballon in the square in the war.

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Born here
Roy Mathieson   
Added: 27 Jun 2024 16:25 GMT   

St Saviours
My great grandmother was born in Bowling Green Lane in 1848. The family moved from there to Earl Terrace, Bermondsey in 1849. I have never been able to locate Earl Terrace on maps.

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Added: 26 Jun 2024 13:10 GMT   

Buckhurst Street, E1
Mt grandfather, Thomas Walton Ward had a musical instrument workshop in Buckhurst Street from 1934 until the street was bombed during the war. Grandfather was a partner in the musical instrument firm of R.J. Ward and Sons of Liverpool. He died in 1945 and is buried in a common grave at Abney Park Cemetery.

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Lived here
Mike Dowling   
Added: 15 Jun 2024 15:51 GMT   

Family ties (1936 - 1963)
The Dowling family lived at number 13 Undercliffe Road for
Nearly 26 years. Next door was the Harris family

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Comment
Evie Helen   
Added: 13 Jun 2024 00:03 GMT   

Vickers Road
The road ’Vickers Road’ is numbered rather differently to other roads in the area as it was originally built as housing for the "Vickers" arms factory in the late 1800’s and early 1900s. Most of the houses still retain the original 19th century tiling and drainage outside of the front doors.

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LOCAL PHOTOS
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Maps of the Environs of London (1932) Seemingly one of the highlights of London tourism in 1932 was the Pears Factory in Isleworth, Middlesex, according to the only picture on this map. Before the creation of the Greater London Council in 1965, the county boundaries in the region were quirky. We dealt with the County of London a few maps back. Middlesex was the second smallest county in England but unfortunate enough to be swallowed by the urban expansion of London between the wars. It made certain administrative coordination decisions difficult, with for example Hampstead run by County Hall, London but next door Willesden run by County Hall, Brentford with Edgware Road forming the border between the two. Hammersmith on the Thames in London meanwhile was opposite Barnes, Surrey but Putney, a mile downstream, was back in London. Kent and London split the Thamesmead area. Urban Bromley was part of the former whereas rural Eltham (in 1932) part of the latter. Essex, highly built up on the fringes of the capital, stretched all the way to the River Lea. West Ham, Stratford, Barking and Romford were all not in London. Hertfordshire had a strange salient which contained Barnet and run all the way, but for 200 yards, to Southgate station. The bundling of everything into the GLC in 1965 made a lot of political sense even if it made of lot of interesting geography redundant.
Credit: George Philip and Son Ltd.
TUM image id: 1715687465
Licence:
A matter of geometry
TUM image id: 1713792388
Licence:
Facebook
TUM image id: 1713788023
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Toll booths at the Dartford Crossing (2011)
Credit: Wiki Commons/Darren Meacher
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Maps of the Environs of London (1932) Seemingly one of the highlights of London tourism in 1932 was the Pears Factory in Isleworth, Middlesex, according to the only picture on this map. Before the creation of the Greater London Council in 1965, the county boundaries in the region were quirky. We dealt with the County of London a few maps back. Middlesex was the second smallest county in England but unfortunate enough to be swallowed by the urban expansion of London between the wars. It made certain administrative coordination decisions difficult, with for example Hampstead run by County Hall, London but next door Willesden run by County Hall, Brentford with Edgware Road forming the border between the two. Hammersmith on the Thames in London meanwhile was opposite Barnes, Surrey but Putney, a mile downstream, was back in London. Kent and London split the Thamesmead area. Urban Bromley was part of the former whereas rural Eltham (in 1932) part of the latter. Essex, highly built up on the fringes of the capital, stretched all the way to the River Lea. West Ham, Stratford, Barking and Romford were all not in London. Hertfordshire had a strange salient which contained Barnet and run all the way, but for 200 yards, to Southgate station. The bundling of everything into the GLC in 1965 made a lot of political sense even if it made of lot of interesting geography redundant.
Credit: George Philip and Son Ltd.
Licence:


A matter of geometry
Licence:


A map a day for the month of May Political map of the County of London (1930). That section of Woolwich north of the Thames, surrounded by Essex was quite an interesting anomaly. The borough had inherited these two exclaves from Kent when the borders of the new County of London had been drawn up in 1888. They continued to make no sense whatsoever until 1965 when the arrival of the Greater London Council abolished them, assigning them to Newham.
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A map a day for the month of May This early map by Lea in 1690 shows the marshy banks of the River Thames. The north bank is solid marsh from Silvertown to Tilbury. Much of the south bank is too, but this has not been depicted so much by the cartographer.
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A map a day for the month of May 1756 map of the proposed route of the New Road - in particular here both Euston Road and Pentonville Road. From the small cluster of buildings at Tottenham Court (today’s Warren Street station), two parallel dotted lines mark the future route of Euston Road to Battle Bridge (King’s Cross). Then the dotted lines continue as Pentonville Road - since they are traversing the land owned by Henry Penton - to the Angel, Islington. They had been an alternative route proposed - the other set of dotted lines
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A map a day for the month of May I have a bit of a map collection in my possession. Throughout May, I will be publishing one old map every day. This one is an 1855 London overview best seen on a desktop computer rather than a phone - you’ll be able to zoom into your favourite area of London in reasonable detail. The original is in much better definition which I will publish sections of at some point in the future.
Credit: J.H. Colton
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Children enjoy themselves at a Christmas Party, on 25 December 1940, in a London underground shelter
Credit: AP
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Fortune-telling bird (1940s) - once a common sight in London markets
Credit: Walter Joseph Collection/British Library
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Modern family, London (1936)
Credit: Horacio Coppola
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