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Featured · Queen’s Park ·
October
6
2022

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Northumberland Avenue, WC2N
Northumberland Avenue runs from Trafalgar Square in the west to the Thames Embankment in the east. In 1608–09, Henry Howard, 1st Earl of Northampton built a house on the eastern side of the former Chapel and Hospital of St. Mary Rounceval, at Charing Cross, including gardens running to the River Thames and adjoining Scotland Yard to the west. The estate became the property of Algernon Percy, 10th Earl of Northumberland when he married Howard’s great-great niece, Lady Elizabeth, in 1642, whereupon it was known as Northumberland House.

In June 1874, the whole of Northumberland House was purchased by the Metropolitan Board of Works and demolished to form Northumberland Avenue, which would accommodate hotels. The road was part built on the parallel Northumberland Street.

Contemporary planning permissions forbade hotels to be taller than the width of the road they were on; consequently Northumberland Avenue was built with a wide carriageway. Part of the parallel Northumberland Street was demolished in order to make way for the avenue’s eastern...

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JULY
26
2022

 

Houghton Street (1906)
A greengrocer’s on the corner of Houghton Street and Clare Market (behind The Strand) in 1906 just before demolition The thoroughfare known as Clare Market, leading eastwards into Lincoln’s Inn Fields, was so called in honour of the Earl of Clare, who lived "in a princely mansion" adjacent. His name is inscribed as a parishioner of St. Clement Danes in the ratebooks of 1617. In Howell’s "Londinopolis" of 1657 we read: "Then is there, towards Drury Lane, a new market, called Clare Market; then is there a street and palace of the same name, built by the Earl of Clare, who lived there in a princely mansion, having a house, a street, and a market both for flesh and fish, all bearing his name." It is also mentioned by Strype:- "Clare Market, very considerable and well served with provisions, both flesh and fish; for, besides the butchers in the shambles, it is much resorted unto by the country butchers and higglers. The market-days are Wednesdays and Saturdays."

"This market," says Nightingale, in the tenth volume of the Beauties of England and Wales, "stands on what was...
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JULY
25
2022

 

The Hare
The Hare is situated at 505 Cambridge Heath Road The Hare has existed on this site since the 1770s. The current building dates from around 1860.
»read full article


JUNE
21
2022

 

High Barnet - Totteridge walk
This walk takes in the top of the Northern Line High Barnet is a London Underground station and, in the past, a railway station, located in Chipping Barnet. It is the terminus of the High Barnet branch of the Northern line and is the start of a walk which takes us on to Totteridge and Whetstone station.

High Barnet station was an idea of the Edgware, Highgate and London Railway and was opened on 1 April 1872 by the Great Northern Railway which had taken over by then. It was situated on one of the original sites of the Barnet Fair and was the terminus of the branch line that ran from Finsbury Park via Highgate.

The section north of East Finchley was incorporated into the London Underground network because of the Northern Heights project begun in the late 1930s. High Barnet station was served by Northern line trains from 14 April 1940 onwards.

The station retains much of its original Victorian architectural character, with some platform buildings dating from the pre-London Transport era.»more


MAY
19
2022

 

Lochnagar Street, E14
Lochnagar Street runs east from the Blackwall Tunnel northern approach road Before the coming of the Blackwall Tunnel, there was a road called Brunswick Road from which Lochnagar Street ran, towards Islay Wharf.

This area of Poplar contains a large number of streets with Scottish names because they were built on an estate which had been bought by the McIntosh family in 1823. The McIntosh Housing Estate was laid out during the 1870s and the road layout was formalised. During the 1880s an oil works was established on the river frontage.

The developer and builder of the housing was John Abbott, who is commemorated in Abbott Road - the longest street in this part of Poplar. The houses in Lochnagar Street had three rooms and a scullery down­stairs.

The initial letters of other street names were chosen alphabetically from Aberfeldy Street to Zetland Street. Other roads in this patch include Ailsa Street, Blair Street, Culloden Street, Dee Street, Ettrick Street, Findhorn Street, Leven Road, Oban Street, Spey Street, Te...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

Reply
Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 4 Sep 2022 15:42 GMT   

Superman 2
I worked here in 1977. The scene in the prison laundry in Superman 2 was filmed here.

Reply

TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:44 GMT   

The world’s first underground train
The very first underground train left Paddington on the new Metropolitan Railway bound for Farringdon Street.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:17 GMT   

TV comes to Olympia
Over 7000 people queued to see the first high definition television pictures on sets at the Olympia Radio Show. The pictures were transmitted by the BBC from Alexandra Palace, introduced by Leslie Mitchell, their first announcer.

Reply


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 507 completed street histories and 46993 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS

OCTOBER
31
2019

 

Kentish Town West
Kentish Town West station opened on 1 April 1867 as ’Kentish Town’ and was renamed ’Kentish Town West’ on 2 June 1924. The station closed after a serious fire on 18 April 1971. It was rebuilt and reopened on 5 October 1981.

The station is now managed by London Overground, which also operates all services from the station.
»read full article


OCTOBER
17
2019

 

Akenside Road, NW3
Akenside Road is a street named after a famous local resident. Dr Mark Akenside (1721 – 1770) was an English poet and physician who lived and had his medical practise at North End, Hampstead.

Akenside was best known for his poem The Pleasures of Imagination, an eclectic philosophical essay that takes as its starting point papers on the same subject written by Joseph Addison for The Spectator.

Akenside Road followed the line of an old footpath.
»read full article


OCTOBER
16
2019

 

Victoria Coach Station
Victoria Coach Station is the largest coach station in London. It serves as a terminus for many medium- and long-distance coach services in the United Kingdom and is also the departure point for many countryside coach tours originating from London.

Victoria Coach Station was opened at its present site in Buckingham Palace Road in 1932, by London Coastal Coaches, a consortium of coach operators. The building is in a distinctive Art Deco style, the architects for which were Wallis, Gilbert and Partners. In 1970 the coach operators’ association which managed the station became a subsidiary of the National Bus Company.

In 1988, ownership of Victoria Coach Station Limited was transferred to London Transport. In 2000, Transport for London was formed and took over the station.

The freeholder of the site, Grosvenor Group, announced in 2013 that it wishes to redevelop the site and relocate the station elsewhere in London. However, the building was listed at Grade II by English Heritage in 2014.
»read full article


OCTOBER
15
2019

 

The Athenaeum Hotel
The Athenaeum is a family-owned five-star hotel overlooking Green Park. Hope House was built at 116 Piccadilly in 1849/50 by Henry Pelham-Clinton, the 6th Duke of Newcastle. The name Athenaeum first appears around 1864 when the house was bought by the Junior Athenaeum Club. The house was redeveloped in the 1930s as an art deco apartment block, still called the Athenaeum.

In 1971 the Rank Organisation purchased the 1930s Athenaeum Court apartment block, opening it as The Athenaeum Hotel after a two-year refurbishment.
»read full article


OCTOBER
10
2019

 

Baden-Powell House
Baden-Powell House is a Scouting hostel and conference centre built as a tribute to Lord Baden-Powell, the founder of Scouting.. The building committee, chaired by Sir Harold Gillett, Lord Mayor of London, purchased the site in 1956, and assigned Ralph Tubbs to design the house in the modern architectural style. The foundation stone was laid in 1959 by World Chief Guide Olave, Lady Baden-Powell, and it was opened in 1961 by Queen Elizabeth II. The largest part of the £400,000 cost was provided by the Scout Movement itself. Over the years, the house has been refurbished several times, so that it now provides modern and affordable lodging for Scouts, Guides, their families and the general public staying in London. The building also hosts conference and event space for hire.

From 1974 to 2001, Baden-Powell House was the headquarters of The Scout Association, for which a dedicated extension to the house was completed in 1976. In April 2001, the headquarters formally moved to new accommodation at Gilwell Park. As the owner of Baden-Powell House, The Scout Association receives a net income out of the ...
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OCTOBER
8
2019

 

Wormholt Farm
Wormholt Farm existed until the First World War. The name ’Wormeholt’ is a term referring to snake-infested woodland in old English. The name was first used in 1189 after the woodland was cleared. The land became part of the Manor of Fulham and owned by the Bishops of London. The manor then descended to become Wormholt Barns.

For 200 years from 1548, Wormholt was leased to the Duke of Somerset. By the beginning of the seventeenth century, a family called Atley was running it but the poor quality of most of the land led to frequent changes of tenancy.

In the nineteenth century Wormholt Barns Manor was split between Eynham Farm and Wormholt Farm.

A survey of 1833 described the soil of Wormholt Farm as "strong loam, making good grazing fields near Uxbridge Road, but towards Wormholt Wood Scrubs it becomes too stiff and too wet in winter." These soil characteristics determined the eventual use of the land. The northern areas of the farm remained as arable and grazing almost to t...
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OCTOBER
4
2019

 

Warwick Avenue
Warwick Avenue is an area, street and a Bakerloo Line tube station near Little Venice. The area of which Warwick Avenue is part - Little Venice - is one of London’s prime residential areas, known for its shops and restaurants.

Warwick Avenue opened on 31 January 1915 on the Bakerloo line’s extension from Paddington to Queen’s Park. For a time prior to its opening, the proposed name for the station was Warrington Crescent. There are no surface buildings and the station is accessed by two sets of steps to a sub-surface ticket hall. It was one of the first London Underground stations built specifically to use escalators rather than lifts.

Warwick Avenue is also the name of a song that makes reference to the station by the Welsh singer, Duffy.


»read full article


OCTOBER
3
2019

 

Middlesex Arms
On the north side of Bignall’s Corner was the Middlesex Arms. Bignalls Corner - now the site of South Mimms services - existed before the M25/A1(M) junction obliterated the scene.

On the junction was the Middlesex Arms. The pub had been built as a road house in 1931 but was demolished in 1973 to make way for the A1(M). Run by landlords Gordon and Hilda, there was lorry drivers’ overnight accommodation next to it. Drivers used to sleep in bunks four to a room.

The motel of the other side of the junction was a well known haunt for ‘ladies of the night’ who earned a living from the passing lorry drivers.

Further north up the A1 was the Budgie transport cafe, immortalised in the TV series of the same name. Also beside the A1 was the eventually abandoned and derelict ’San Marino’ which had a swimming pool in the back.
»read full article


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