Worgan Street, SE11

Road in/near Lambeth, existing between 1859 and now

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Road · Lambeth · SE11 ·
FEBRUARY
13
2022

Worgan Street is the new name for the former Catherine Street in the Vauxhall Gardens Estate area.

Spring Gardens was established here in the reign of King Charles II. Here could be found live entertainers, food and drink. It was a venue for amorous liaisons, as regular visitor Samuel Pepys noted.

In 1729, the Vauxhall Spring-Gardens was sublet to the entrepreneurial Jonathan Tyers who saw an opportunity to provide a new style of entertainment for Londoners, charging an admission fee of one shilling to discourage the pickpockets and ’ladies of the night’. This became the first and best-known of London’s pleasure gardens. Over the next 130 years Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens played host to concerts, operas, firework displays, circus acts, balloon rides and more.

In 1859, the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens were closed and the area redeveloped into housing. Catherine Street was built here and the street was renamed Worgan Street in the late 1930s.

In the 1970s, the local houses - some badly war-damaged - were demolished and redeveloped but Worgan Street survived though lined with new housing.




Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

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Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   

Bessborough Place, SW1V
I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see thier children playing.

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Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   

Hurley Road, SE11
There were stables in the road mid way - also Danny reading had a coal delivery lorry.

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Comment
Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   

Saunders Street, SE11
I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


   
Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

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Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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Brian Lynch   
Added: 10 Apr 2022 13:38 GMT   

Staples Mattress Factory
An architect’s design of the Staples Mattress Factory
An image found on the website of Dalzell’s Beds, in Armagh Northern Ireland.

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Lived here
   
Added: 19 Feb 2022 16:21 GMT   

Harmondsworth (1939 - 1965)
I lived in a house (Lostwithiel) on the Bath Road opposite the junction with Tythe Barn Lane, now a hotel site. Initially, aircraft used one of the diagonal runways directly in line with our house. I attended Sipson Primary School opposite the Three Magpies and celebrated my 21st birthday at The Peggy Bedford in 1959.

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Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

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Comment
   
Added: 14 Jan 2022 03:06 GMT   

Goldbourne Gardens W 10
I lived in Goldbourne Gardens in the 50,s very happy big bomb site

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Chris Nash   
Added: 10 Jan 2022 22:54 GMT   

Shortlands Close, DA17
Shortlands Close and the flats along it were constructed in the mid-1990s. Prior to this, the area was occupied by semi-detached houses with large gardens, which dated from the post-war period and were built on the site of Railway Farm. The farm and its buildings spanned the length of Abbey Road, on the south side of the North Kent Line railway tracks.

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Gunner’s Cottages (1910) Gunner’s Cottages, off Salamanca Street, Lambeth 1910.
Street cricket (1953) Street cricket has been played across London since the rules of the game were formulated.
Vauxhall Gardens Vauxhall Gardens was a pleasure garden, one of the leading venues for public entertainment from the mid 17th century to the mid 19th century.
Vauxhall Station early 1900s. Vauxhall at the turn of the twentieth century.

NEARBY STREETS
Albert Embankment, SE11 Albert Embankment was built between 1866 and 1869, under the direction of Joseph Bazalgette, over former marshlands.
Albert Embankment, SW8 Albert Embankment is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Arden House, SE11 Residential block
Auckland Street, SE11 Auckland Street is a continuation of Glyn Street.
Aveline Street, SE11 Aveline Street is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Beaufoy Walk, SE11 Beaufoy Walk is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Black Prince Road, SE1 Black Prince Road is named after Edward, the Black Prince, the son of King Edward III
Black Prince Road, SE11 Black Prince Road’s origin is derived from Edward of Woodstock (Edward the Black Prince) who lived in Lambeth during the 1300.
Bricklayers Street, SE11 Bricklayers Street is a location in London.
Bridgefoot, SW8 Bridgefoot is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Cabanel Place, SE11 Cabanel Place is a location in London.
Cardigan Street, SE11 Cardigan Street formed part of the Duchy of Cornwall’s local estate.
Citadel Place, SE11 Citadel Place is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Courtenay Square, SE11 Courtenay Square is one of a number of local streets with houses built in a neo-Georgian style.
Courtenay Street, SE11 Courtenay Street was built in 1925 as part of the Duchy of Cornwall’s estate.
Distin Street, SE11 Distin Street is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Dolland House, SE11 Residential block
Durham Street, SE11 Durham Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Farnham Royal, SE11 Farnham Royal is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Gibson Road, SE11 Gibson Road is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Glasshouse Walk, SE11 Glasshouse Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Glyn Street, SE11 Glyn Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Goding Street, SE11 Goding Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Graphite Square, SE11 Graphite Square is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Hansom Mews, SE11 Hansom Mews is a location in London.
Hotspur Street, SE11 Hotspur Street is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Jameson House, SE11 Jameson House stands on the corner of Worgan Street and Glasshouse Walk.
Jonathan Street, SE11 Jonathan Street commemorates Jonathan Tyers who was the owner of the Vauxhall Gardens during the 1700s.
Kennedy House, SE11 Kennedy House stands on the corner of Vauxhall Walk and Glasshouse Walk.
Laud Street, SE11 Laud Street is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Lilac Place, SE11 Lilac Place is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Lollard Street, SE11 Lollard Street runs off Lambeth Walk.
Loughborough Street, SE11 Loughborough Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Lower Fore Street, SE1 Lower Fore Street existed on the Lambeth foreshore until the arrival of Albert Embankment.
Manning Place, SE11 Manning Place appears on 1860s mapping.
Marylee Way, SE11 Marylee Way is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Millbank Tower, SW1P Millbank Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Montford Place, SE11 Montford Place is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Newburn Street, SE11 Newburn Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Newport Street, SE11 Newport Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Orsett Street, SE11 Orsett Street is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Oval Way, SE11 Oval Way is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Pegasus Place, SE11 Pegasus Place is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Randall Road, SE1 Randall Road is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Randall Road, SE11 Randall Road is a location in London.
Salamanca Place, SE1 Salamanca Place is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Salamanca Place, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Salamanca Street, SE1 Salamanca Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Sancroft Street, SE11 Sancroft Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Saunders Street, SE11 Saunders Street used to run from Fitzalan Street to Lollard Street.
Scotson House, SE11 Residential block
Sedley House, SE11 Residential block
Simpson House, SE11 Residential block
South Lambeth Place, SW8 South Lambeth Place links South Lambeth Road to Bondway.
South Street, SE11 South Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Southbank House, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Spring Mews, SE11 Spring Mews is a location in London.
St Oswalds Place, SE11 St Oswalds Place is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
St. Oswalds Place, SE11 St. Oswalds Place is a location in London.
Studios, SE11 Studios is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Three Colts Corner, E1 Three Colts Corner is a road in the E2 postcode area
Three Colts Lane, E1 Three Colts Lane is a road in the E1 postcode area
Tinworth Street, SE11 Tinworth Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Tyers Street, SE11 Tyers Street is named for Jonathan Tyers who was the eighteenth century owner of the Vauxhall Gardens.
Tyers Terrace, SE11 Tyers Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Upper Fore Street, SE1 Upper Fore Street was a street of various factories and manufacturing premises.
Vauxhall Bridge, SW1P Vauxhall Bridge is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Vauxhall Cross, SW8 Vauxhall Cross is now known as the site of the MI5 headquarters.
Vauxhall Street, SE11 Vauxhall Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Vauxhall Walk, SE11 Vauxhall Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Vox Studios 1-45, SE11 Vox Studios 1-45 is a location in London.
West Bridge, SW8 West Bridge is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Westminster Business Square, SE11 Westminster Business Square is a business centre.
Whitgift House, SE11 Residential block
Whitgift Street, SE1 Whitgift Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Whitgift Street, SE11 Whitgift Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Wickham Street, SE11 Wickham Street is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Wren Mews, SE11 Wren Mews is a location in London.
Wynyard Terrace, SE11 Wynyard Terrace is a road in the SE11 postcode area

NEARBY PUBS
Duchy Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Eagle London South Central This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
South London Pacific This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Beehive This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Black Dog This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Black Prince This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Pilgrim This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Riverside (Unit 14) This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Rose This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Royal Vauxhall Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Zeitgeist @ The Jolly Gardeners This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Lambeth

The ’Lamb’ in Lambeth really means just that.

The name is recorded in 1062 as Lambehitha, meaning ’landing place for lambs’, and in 1255 as Lambeth. The name refers to a harbour where lambs were either shipped from or to. It is formed from the Old English ’lamb’ and ’hythe.

South Lambeth is recorded as Sutlamehethe in 1241 and North Lambeth is recorded in 1319 as North Lamhuth. The marshland in the area, known as Lambeth Marshe, was drained in the 18th century but is remembered in the Lower Marsh street name. Sometime after the opening of Waterloo railway station in 1848 the locality around the station and Lower Marsh became known as Waterloo.

Lambeth Palace is located opposite the Palace of Westminster. The two were linked by a horse ferry across the Thames.

Until the mid-18th Century the north of Lambeth was marshland, crossed by a number of roads raised against floods.

With the opening of Westminster Bridge in 1750, followed by the Blackfriars Bridge and Vauxhall Bridge, a number of major thoroughfares were developed through Lambeth, such as Westminster Bridge Road, Kennington Road and Camberwell New Road.

In William Blake’s epic Milton a Poem, the poet John Milton leaves Heaven and travels to Lambeth, in the form of a falling comet, and enters Blake’s foot. This allows Blake to treat the ordinary world as perceived by the five senses as a sandal formed of "precious stones and gold" that he can now wear. Blake ties the sandal and, guided by Los, walks with it into the City of Art, inspired by the spirit of poetic creativity. The poem was written between 1804 and 1810.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Church Street (1866)
TUM image id: 1575388511
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Building Westminster Bridge (1744) Westminster Bridge was constructed between 1738 and 1750. Richard Wilson’s view of the bridge under construction can be dated to around September 1744. It was at this time that the timber framework supporting the arch immediately to the left of the central span was dismantled - an operation clearly visible in Wilson’s picture. The painting also shows the first stages of construction of the two arches to the right of the central arch, work which had begun that summer. The balustrade surmounting the central arch, although visible in Wilson’s picture, was not completed until the summer of 1745, suggesting that the artist had access to detailed plans or even the designer’s model for the bridge. Wilson’s view is taken from the Westminster side of the river, from Parliament Stairs, looking east towards the city of London and the dome of St Paul’s cathedral, visible on the horizon between the incomplete section of the bridge and the Lambeth shore.
Credit: Richard Wilson/Tate Britain
TUM image id: 1623676338
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Overflow of the Thames at Lambeth Stairs on Tuesday 29 January 1850. Lambeth Stairs was near to Lambeth Palace. Poor river wall maintenance meant that the area was flooded whenever there was an unusually high tide.
Credit: Illustrated London News
Licence:


Children among the rubble of a legitimised bombsite playground at Lollard Street, Lambeth (1957) Children’s rights campaigner Lady Allen of Hurtwood formed a movement for the building of playgrounds. Originally known as ‘junk’ playgrounds, they were renamed adventure playgrounds in 1953 and the movement grew.
Credit: London Borough of Lambeth
Licence:


South Lambeth Place
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Vauxhall Cross (1930s) In this view only the railway bridgework remains the same. Everything else is gone, even the road layout.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


An unnamed side street off of Fitzalan Street, Lambeth (1921)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Lower Fore Street, a narrow cobblestoned street in Lambeth, pictured in 1865. Fore Street is shown on John Roque’s map of 1746. It ran alongside the river between Vauxhall Gardens and Lambeth Palace.
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Church Street (1866)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Upper Fore Street, Lambeth (1860s)
Credit: William Strudwick (1834-1910)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


"A View of London taken off Lambeth Church", hand-coloured engraving by John Boydell. On the right is Lambeth Marsh, possibly somewhat idealised, with Lambeth Palace in the foreground. Much of Lambeth continued to be marsh until the beginning of the 19th century. On the left is Westminster and Westminster Bridge across the Thames. In the distance is St Paul’s Cathedral.
Credit: John Boydell/Yale Center for British Art
Licence:


"The Thames from Millbank", oil on canvas, Richard Redgrave (1804-1888), created around 1836. The scene depicted is around the year 1815.
Credit: Richard Redgrave/Victoria and Albert Museum
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