Duke Of Argyll

Pub/bar in/near Soho

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Pub/bar · Soho · W1F ·
JUNE
11
2018

This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.

If you know the current status of this business, please comment.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

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Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

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Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   

Saunders Street, SE11
I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

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Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Lynette beardwood   
Added: 29 Nov 2022 20:53 GMT   

Spy’s Club
Topham’s Hotel at 24-28 Ebury Street was called the Ebury Court Hotel. Its first proprietor was a Mrs Topham. In WW2 it was a favourite watering hole for the various intelligence organisations based in the Pimlico area. The first woman infiltrated into France in 1942, FANY Yvonne Rudellat, was recruited by the Special Operations Executive while working there. She died in Bergen Belsen in April 1945.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:39 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

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Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:38 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

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Lived here
Phil Stubbington   
Added: 14 Nov 2022 16:28 GMT   

Numbers 60 to 70 (1901 - 1939)
A builder, Robert Maeers (1842-1919), applied to build six houses on plots 134 to 139 on the Lincoln House Estate on 5 October 1901. He received approval on 8 October 1901. These would become numbers 60 to 70 Rodenhurst Road (60 is plot 139). Robert Maeers was born in Northleigh, Devon. In 1901 he was living in 118 Elms Road with his wife Georgina, nee Bagwell. They had four children, Allan, Edwin, Alice, and Harriet, born between 1863 and 1873.
Alice Maeers was married to John Rawlins. Harriet Maeers was married to William Street.
Three of the six houses first appear on the electoral register in 1904:
Daniel Mescal “Ferncroft”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By the 1905 electoral register all six are occupied:

Daniel Mescal “St Senans”
Henry Robert Honeywood “Grasmere”
John Rawlins “Iveydene”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Walter Ernest Manning “St Hilda”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By 1906 house numbers replace names:

Daniel Mescal 70
Henry Robert Honeywood 68
John Rawlins 66
William Francis Street 64
Walter Ernest Manning 62
Henry Elkin 60

It’s not clear whether number 70 changed from “Ferncroft” to “St Senans” or possibly Daniel Mescal moved houses.

In any event, it can be seen that Robert Maeers’ two daughters are living in numbers 64 and 66, with, according to local information, an interconnecting door. In the 1911 census William Street is shown as a banker’s clerk. John Rawlins is a chartering clerk in shipping. Robert Maeers and his wife are also living at this address, Robert being shown as a retired builder.

By 1939 all the houses are in different ownership except number 60, where the Elkins are still in residence.


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stephen garraway   
Added: 13 Nov 2022 13:56 GMT   

Martin Street, Latimer Road
I was born at St Charlottes and lived at 14, Martin Street, Latimer Road W10 until I was 4 years old when we moved to the east end. It was my Nan Grant’s House and she was the widow of George Frederick Grant. She had two sons, George and Frederick, and one daughter, my mother Margaret Patricia.
The downstairs flat where we lived had two floors, the basement and the ground floor. The upper two floors were rented to a Scot and his family, the Smiths. He had red hair. The lights and cooker were gas and there was one cold tap over a Belfast sink. A tin bath hung on the wall. The toilet was outside in the yard. This was concreted over and faced the the rear of the opposite terraces. All the yards were segregated by high brick walls. The basement had the a "best" room with a large , dark fireplace with two painted metal Alsation ornaments and it was very dark, cold and little used.
The street lights were gas and a man came round twice daily to turn them on and off using a large pole with a hook and a lighted torch on the end. I remember men coming round the streets with carts selling hot chestnuts and muffins and also the hurdy gurdy man with his instrument and a monkey in a red jacket. I also remember the first time I saw a black man and my mother pulling me away from him. He had a Trilby and pale Mackintosh so he must of been one of the first of the Windrush people. I seem to recall he had a thin moustache.
Uncle George had a small delivery lorry but mum lost touch with him and his family. Uncle Fred went to Peabody Buildings near ST.Pauls.
My Nan was moved to a maisonette in White City around 1966, and couldn’t cope with electric lights, cookers and heating and she lost all of her neighbourhood friends. Within six months she had extreme dementia and died in a horrible ward in Tooting Bec hospital a year or so later. An awful way to end her life, being moved out of her lifelong neighbourhood even though it was slums.

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Comment
   
Added: 31 Oct 2022 18:47 GMT   

Memories
I lived at 7 Conder Street in a prefab from roughly 1965 to 1971 approx - happy memories- sad to see it is no more ?

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Eve Glover   
Added: 22 Oct 2022 09:28 GMT   

Shenley Road
Shenley Road is the main street in Borehamwood where the Job Centre and Blue Arrow were located

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Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

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Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Admiral Duncan The Admiral Duncan is well-known as one of Soho’s oldest gay pubs.
De Hems De Hems has become a base for London’s Dutch community, serving bitterballen and frikandellen.
Leicester Square Leicester Square, while indeed a square, is also the name for a tube station.
L’Escargot L’Escargot is one of London’s oldest restaurants.
Oxford Circus Oxford Circus, designed by John Nash in 1811.
Piccadilly Circus Piccadilly Circus was built in 1819 to connect Regent Street with the major shopping street of Piccadilly.
Queen’s Theatre The Queen’s Theatre is located in Shaftesbury Avenue on the corner of Wardour Street.
Royal Institution The Royal Institution of Great Britain (Royal Institution) is an organisation for scientific education and research, based in the City of Westminster.
St Giles St Giles is a district of central London, at the southern tip of the London Borough of Camden.
Trident Studios Trident Studios was located at 17 St Anne’s Court between 1968 and 1981.
Wyld’s Great Globe Wyld’s Great Globe was an attraction situated in Leicester Square between 1851 and 1862.

NEARBY STREETS
Air Street, SW1Y Air Street was the most westerly street in London when newly built in 1658.
Air Street, W1B Air Street’s name is believed to be a corruption of ‘Ayres’, after Thomas Ayre, a local brewer and resident in the 17th century.
Albany Courtyard, SW1Y The courtyard is named after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, who in 1791 purchased Melbourne House which stood on this site.
Albany, W1B The Albany is an apartment complex in Piccadilly, established in 1802.
Albemarle Street, W1S Albemarle Street takes its name from the second Duke of Albermarle, son of General Monk.
Andrew Borde Street, W1D Andrew Borde Street was situated opposite the end of Sutton Row and under the Centre Point development.
Apple Tree Yard, SW1Y Apple Tree Yard is thought named after the apple trees formerly to be found here.
Archer Street, W1D Archer Street was Arch Street in 1675, Orchard Street in 1720 and Archer Street by 1746.
Argyll Street, W1F Argyll Street was named after John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll, owner of the land in the 18th century.
Babmaes Street, SW1Y Babmaes Street was originally called Wells Street.
Bateman Street, W1D Bateman Street was named for Sir James Bateman, local landowner and Lord Mayor of London in the 1670s.
Batemans Buildings, W1D Batemans Buildings is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Beak Street, W1B Beak Street runs roughly east-west between Regent Street and Lexington Street.
Beak Street, W1F Beak Street is named after Thomas Beake, one of the Queen’s messengers.
Bear Street, WC2H Bear Street is a streetname with two possible derivations.
Berwick Road, W1F Berwick Road is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Berwick Street, W1F Berwick Street commemorates the Duke of Berwick, an illegitimate son of James II.
Bourchier Street, W1D Bourchier Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Boyle Street, W1S Boyle Street was built on a piece of land called the Ten Acres to discharge some Boyle family debts.
Brewer Street, W1D Brewer Street runs west to east from Glasshouse Street to Wardour Street.
Brewer Street, W1F Brewer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Bridle Lane, W1F Bridle Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Broadwick Street, W1F Broadwick Street runs west-east between Marshall Street and Wardour Street, crossing Berwick Street.
Burlington Arcade, SW1Y Burlington Arcade is a covered shopping arcade, 179 metres in length, that runs from Piccadilly to Burlington Gardens.
Burlington Gardens, W1J Burlington Gardens, with houses dating from 1725, was laid out on land that was once part of the Burlington Estate.
Cambridge Circus, WC2H Cambridge Circus is the intersection of Shaftesbury Avenue and Charing Cross Road.
Cape Yard, W1D A street within the W1D postcode
Carlisle Street, W1D Carlisle Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Carlisle Walk, W1D Carlisle Walk is a road in the E8 postcode area
Carnaby Street, W1F Carnaby Street became the heart of Swinging London.
Cecil Court, WC2N Cecil Court is a pedestrian street with Victorian shop-frontages.
Chapone Place, W1D Chapone Place is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Charing Cross Mansions, WC2H Charing Cross Mansions is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Charing Cross Road, WC2H Charing Cross Road is a street running immediately north of St Martin-in-the-Fields to St Giles Circus.
Chesham House, W1B Chesham House is a block on Regent Street
Ching Court, WC2H Ching Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Church Place, SW1Y Church Place was named after the adjacent St James’s Church, Piccadilly.
Clifford Street, W1S Clifford Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Coach And Horses Yard, W1S Coach And Horses Yard is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Conduit Street, W1S Conduit Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Cork Street, W1S Cork Street, on the Burlington Estate, was named after Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington and 4th Earl of Cork.
Coventry Street, W1D Coventry Street is a short street connecting Piccadilly Circus to Leicester Square. On the London Monopoly board, it was named after the politician Henry Coventry, secretary of state to Charles II.
Cranbourn Street, WC2H Cranbourne Street was named after local landowner the Earl of Salisbury, Viscount Cranbourn (Cranbourne) after the town in Dorset.
D’Arblay Street, W1F D’Arblay Street is a location in London.
Dansey Place, W1D Dansey Place is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Dean Street, W1D Dean Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Denman Street, W1D Denman Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Denmark Place, WC2H Denmark Place was an alleyway one block north of Denmark Street.
Denmark Street, WC2H Denmark Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Dover Street, W1J Dover Street is notable for its Georgian architecture as well as the location of historic London clubs and hotels.
Duck Lane, W1F Duck Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Dudley House, SW1A Dudley House is situated at 169 Piccadilly.
Dufours Place, W1F Dufours Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Duke Of York Street, SW1Y Duke Of York Street runs between Jermyn Street and St James’s Square.
Eagle Place, SW1Y Eagle Place lies off Piccadilly.
Earlham Street, WC2H Earlham Street is one of the spokes leading off of Seven Dials.
Excel Court, WC2H Excel Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Falconberg Mews, W1D Falconberg Mews runs off of Sutton Row.
Flaxman Court, W1F Flaxman Court is a road in the W1F postcode area
Flichcroft Street, WC2H Flichcroft Street is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Flitcroft Street, WC2H Flitcroft Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Foubert’s Place, W1F This is a street in the W1F postcode area
Fouberts Place, W1F Fouberts Place is named after a Frenchman who had a riding school here in the reign of Charles II.
French Railway House, SW1Y French Railway House occupies 178-180 Piccadilly.
Frith Street, W1D Frith Street is named after Richard Frith, a local builder.
Ganton Street, W1F Ganton Street runs across Carnaby Street.
Gerrard Place, W1D Gerrard Place is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Gerrard Street, W1D Gerrard Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Glasshouse Street, W1B Glasshouse Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Golden Square, W1B Golden Square is a historic Soho square, dating from the 1670s.
Goslett Yard, W1D Goslett Yard is a road in the W1D postcode area
Great Chapel Street, W1D Great Chapel Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Great Marlborough Street, W1B Great Marlborough Street runs east of Regent Street past Carnaby Street towards Noel Street.
Great Marlborough Street, W1F Great Marlborough Street was named after John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough.
Great Newport Street, WC2H Great Newport Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Great Pulteney Street, W1F Great Pulteney Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Great Windmill Street, W1F Great Windmill Street has had a long association with music and entertainment, most notably the Windmill Theatre.
Greek Court, W1D Greek Court is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Greek Street, W1D Greek Street leads south from Soho Square to Shaftesbury Avenue.
Greens Court, W1D Greens Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Ham Yard, W1D Ham Yard is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Hanover Street, W1S Hanover Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Haymarket, SW1Y Haymarket – site of a former market selling hay until the 1830s.
Heddon Street, W1B Heddon Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Heddon Street, W1B Heddon Street is a road in the W1S postcode area
Hills Place, W1F Hills Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Hobhouse Court, WC2H Hobhouse Court is named after Sir John Cam Hobhouse, Victorian MP and arts patron.
Hog Lane, WC2H Hog Lane was a lane that went from St Giles’ leper hospital (set up in the 12th century) to the monument to Eleanor at Charing Cross.
Holland Street, W1F Holland Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Hollen Street, W1F Hollen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Hopkins Street, W1F Hopkins Street is a road in the W1F postcode area
Horse and Dolphin Yard, W1D Horse and Dolphin Yard once lay behind the Horse and Dolphin Inn.
Ingestre Court, W1F Ingestre Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Ingestre Place, W1F Ingestre Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
International House, W1S Residential block
Irving Street, WC2H Irving Street is named after Henry Irving, the popular Victorian actor.
Jermyn Street, SW1Y Jermyn Street is the main east-west road of St James’s.
John Street, W1F John Street is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Kemp’s Court, W1F Kemp’s Court is situated in the heart of Berwick Street Market where a line of stalls stretch down both sides of the road.
Kingly Court, W1B Kingly Court is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Kingly Street, W1F Kingly Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Kinnaird House, SW1Y Kinnaird House is a block on Pall Mall.
Leicester Place, WC2H Leicester Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Leicester Square, WC2H Leicester Square is a central tourist attraction of London.
Leicester Street, WC2H Leicester Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Lexington Street Cos, W1F Lexington Street Cos is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Lexington Street, W1F Lexington Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Linen Hall, W1B Linen Hall is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Lisle Street, WC2H Lisle Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Litchfield Street, WC2H Litchfield Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Little Compton Street, W1D Little Compton Street was a street in Soho.
Little Marlborough Street, W1B Little Marlborough Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Little Newport Street, WC2H Little Newport Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Livonia Street, W1F Livonia Street was originally Bentinck Street, family name of owner the Duke of Portland.
Lower James Street, W1F Lower James Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Lower John Street, W1F Lower John Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Lower Regent Street, SW1Y Lower Regent Street is the name for the part of Regent Street which lies south of Piccadilly Circus.
Lowndes Court, W1F Lowndes Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Macclesfield Street, W1D Macclesfield Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Maddox Street, W1S Maddox Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Manette Street, W1D Manette Street in Soho is named after the character from Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities.
Marlborough Court, W1F Marlborough Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Marshall Street, W1F Marshall Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Mason’s Arms Mews, W1S Mason’s Arms Mews is a road in the W1S postcode area
Meard Street, W1D John Meard, the younger was a carpenter, later a landowner, who developed the street.
Mercer Street, WC2H Mercer Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Mill Street, W1S Mill Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Monmouth Street, WC2H Monmouth Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Moor Street, W1D Moor Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
New Burlington Mews, W1B New Burlington Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
New Burlington Place, W1S New Burlington Place is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
New Burlington Street, W1B New Burlington Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
New Burlington Street, W1B New Burlington Street is a road in the W1B postcode area
New Compton Street, WC2H New Compton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Newburg Road, W1F Newburg Road is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Newburgh Street, W1F Newburgh Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Newport Court, WC2H Newport Court was laid out approximately on the site of the courtyard of Newport House.
Newport Place, W1D Newport Place was named after Mountjoy Blount, Earl of Newport (Isle of Wight), who owned a house on Newport Street in the 17th century.
Noel Street, W1F Noel Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Norris Street, SW1Y Norris Street – after Godfrye Norris, local leaseholder in the 17th century.
Old Bond Street, W1J Old Bond Street was named for Sir Thomas Bond, a property developer from Peckham who laid out a number of streets in this part of the West End.
Old Burlington Street, W1J Old Burlington Street connects Burlington Gardens and Clifford Street.
Old Compton Street, W1D Old Compton Street is a road that runs east–west through Soho.
Orange Street, WC2H Orange Street gets its name from William III, Prince of Orange - the reigning king when the street was built.
Ormond Yard, SW1Y Ormond Yard was named after James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde, who owned a house next to this yard in the 17th century.
Oxendon Street, W1D Oxendon Street, after Sir Henry Oxendon, husband of Mary Baker, daughter of Robert Baker who built the former Piccadilly House nearby.
Oxford Circus Avenue, W1F Oxford Circus Avenue exists on a lot of London maps but doesn’t exist.
Oxford Circus, W1B Oxford Circus was originally called Regent Circus.
Pall Mall East, SW1A Pall Mall East is an eastern extension of Pall Mall towards Trafalgar Square.
Palladium House, W1B Palladium House is a grade II listed (in 1981) Art Deco office building located on the corner of Great Marlborough Street and Argyll Street.
Panton Street, W1D Panton Street was named after Colonel Thomas Panton, local property dealer of the 17th century.
Peter Street, W1F Peter Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Phoenix Street, WC2H Phoenix Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Piccadilly Arcade, SW1Y Piccadilly Arcade was named after Piccadilly Hall, home of local tailor Robert Baker in the 17th century.
Piccadilly Circus, W1J Piccadilly Circus was laid out by John Nash in 1819.
Piccadilly Place, SW1Y Piccadilly Place is an alleyway leading to Vine Street.
Piccadilly, SW1Y Piccadilly is one of the main London streets.
Poland Street, W1D Poland Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Poland Street, W1F Poland Street is a location in London.
Pollen Street, W1S Pollen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Portland Mews, W1F Portland Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Princes Arcade, SW1Y Princes Arcade, built 1929–33, was named after the former Prince’s Hotel, which stood here.
Princes Street, W1B Princes Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Ramillies Place, W1F Ramillies Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Ramillies Street, W1F Ramillies Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Regent Place, W1B Regent Place is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Regent Street, W1B Regent Street dates from the 1810s and was named after the Prince Regent, later George IV.
Richmond Buildings, W1D Richmond Buildings is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Richmond Mews, W1D Richmond Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Romilly Street, W1D Romilly Street is a small street that runs behind Shaftesbury Avenue and takes its name from lawyer Samuel Romilly.
Royal Arcade, W1S Royal Arcade is an alleyway of exclusive shops.
Royal Opera Arcade, SW1Y Royal Opera Arcade was originally part of an opera house theatre, built by John Nash.
Royalty Mews, W1D Royalty Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Rupert Court, W1D Rupert Court was named for Prince Rupert of the Rhine, the First Lord of the Admiralty when the court was built in 1676.
Rupert Street, W1D Rupert Street – after Prince Rupert of the Rhine, noted 17th century general and son of Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of King James I.
Sackville Street, W1B Sackville Street runs north from Piccadilly.
Sandringham Court, W1F Sandringham Court can be found on Dufour’s Place
Savile Row, W1S Savile Row is known worldwide for gentlemen’s tailoring.
Seven Dials, WC2H Seven Dials was built on the site of the Cock-and-Pie Fields, named for a nearby inn.
Shaftesbury Avenue, W1D Shaftesbury Avenue is a major street in the West End of London, named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury.
Shaftesbury Avenue, WC2H Shaftesbury Avenue was named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, Victorian politician and philanthropist.
Sheraton Street, W1D Sheraton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Sherwood Street, W1F Sherwood Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Silver Place, W1F Silver Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Smiths Court, W1D Smiths Court is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Soho Square, W1D In its early years, Soho Square was one of the most fashionable places to live in London.
Sounding Alley, Sounding Alley is a road in the E3 postcode area
St Albans Street, SW1Y St Albans Street was named after Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of Saint Albans, 17th century politician and local landowner.
St Anne’s Court, W1D St Anne’s Court is an alleyway that connects Dean Street and Wardour Street.
St Giles High Street, WC2H St Giles High Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
St James’s Market, SW1Y St James’s Market was part of the site of St James’s leper hospital in the Middle Ages, named after James, son of Zebedee.
St Martins Court, WC2H St Martins Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
St Martins Lane, WC2N St Martins Lane runs up to Seven Dials from St Martin’s-in-the-Fields.
St Martins Place, WC2N St Martin’s Place is a short stretch connecting Trafalgar Square to the bottom of Charing Cross Road.
St Martins Street, WC2H St Martins Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
St. Giles Square, WC2H St. Giles Square is a location in London.
Stacey Street, WC2H Stacey Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Stafford Street, W1S Stafford Street is named after Margaret Stafford, partner of developer Sir Thomas Bond who built on this site in the seventeenth century.
Suffolk Place, SW1Y The Earl of Suffolk (Thomas Howard) was the reason for the naming of Suffolk Place.
Suffolk Street, SW1Y Suffolk Street was named after Thomas Howard, Earl of Suffolk, who owned a stable yard attached to Northumberland House which lay on this site.
Sutton Row, W1D Sutton Row has existed since 1681.
Swallow Place, W1B Swallow Place is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Swallow Street, SW1Y Swallow Street honours Thomas Swallow, lessee in 1540 of the pastures on which the road was built.
The London Pavillion, SW1Y The London Pavilion is a building on Piccadilly Circus.
Tisbury Court, W1D Tisbury Court is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Tower Court, WC2H Tower Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Tower Street, WC2H Tower Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Townsend House, W1D Residential block
Trafalgar Square, WC2N Trafalgar Square commemorates Horatio Nelson’s 1805 victory at the Battle of Trafalgar.
Upper James Street, W1F Upper James Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Upper John Street, W1F Upper John Street is a road in the W1F postcode area
Upper St Martin’s Lane, WC2H This is a street in the WC2H postcode area
Vigo Street, W1J Vigo Street is a short street running west from Regent Street.
Walkers Court, Walkers Court lies within the postcode.
Walker’s Court, W1D Walker’s Court is one of the many passageways which in past years was known as ’Paved Alley’.
Wardour Mews, W1F Wardour Mews is a cul-de-sac off of Portland Street.
Wardour Street, W1D The W1D part of Wardour Street south of Shaftesbury Avenue runs through London’s Chinatown.
Wardour Street, W1F Wardour Street is a street that runs north from Leicester Square, through Chinatown, across Shaftesbury Avenue to Oxford Street.
Warwick Street, W1B Warwick Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Wedgwood Mews, W1D Wedgwood Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
West Street, WC2H West Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Whitcomb Street, WC2H Whitcomb Street - named after William Whitcomb, 17th century brewer and property developer.
Wilder Walk, W1F This is a street in the W1B postcode area
Winnett Street, W1D Winnett Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Admiral Duncan The Admiral Duncan is well-known as one of Soho’s oldest gay pubs.
Clock House The Coach & Horses is a pub on the corner of Romilly Street and Greek Street.
Coach And Horses The Coach and Horses pub has been on Great Marlborough Street since the mid-18th century.
De Hems De Hems has become a base for London’s Dutch community, serving bitterballen and frikandellen.
Dog and Duck The Dog and Duck is on the corner of Frith Street and Bateman Street.
Graphic Bar This bar used to be known as the Midas Touch.
The Kings Head The Kings Head dates from 1710.


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Soho

Soho is a world-famous area of the City of Westminster and part of the West End of London.

The name "Soho" first appears in the 17th century. Most authorities believe that the name derives from a former hunting cry. James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, used "soho" as a rallying call for his men at the Battle of Sedgemoor on 6 July 1685, half a century after the name was first used for this area of London. The Soho name has been imitated by other entertainment and restaurant districts such as Soho, Hong Kong; Soho, Málaga; SOHO, Beijing; SoHo (South of Horton), London, Ontario, Canada; and Palermo Soho, Buenos Aires. SoHo, Manhattan, gets its name from its location SOuth of HOuston Street, but is also a reference to London’s Soho.

Long established as an entertainment district, for much of the 20th century Soho had a reputation as a base for the sex industry in addition to its night life and its location for the headquarters of leading film companies. Since the 1980s, the area has undergone considerable gentrification. It is now predominantly a fashionable district of upmarket restaurants and media offices, with only a small remnant of sex industry venues.

Soho is a small, multicultural area of central London; a home to industry, commerce, culture and entertainment, as well as a residential area for both rich and poor. It has clubs, including the former Chinawhite nightclub; public houses; bars; restaurants; a few sex shops scattered amongst them; and late-night coffee shops that give the streets an "open-all-night" feel at the weekends. Record shops cluster in the area around Berwick Street, with shops such as Phonica, Sister Ray and Reckless Records.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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William Shakespeare
TUM image id: 1509551019
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Transmission
TUM image id: 1509553463
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Tottenham Court Road (1927)
TUM image id: 1556973109
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Theatreland, Shaftesbury Avenue
Credit: IG/my.wandering.journey
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Transmission
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Trafalgar Square was a former station on the Bakerloo Line before it combined with Strand station on the Northern Line to become the new Charing Cross underground station.
Credit: The Underground Map
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Piccadilly Theatre (2007)
Credit: Turquoisefish
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Buses outside the National Gallery in Trafalgar Square. Date of photo unknown
Credit: Stockholm Transport Museum
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Tottenham Court Road (1927)
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London Hippodrome in 2017
Credit: Ethan Doyle White
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Sectional view of Wyld’s Great Globe, which stood in Leicester Square, London 1851–62
Credit: Illustrated London News
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De Hems, 11 Macclesfield Street and the entrance to Horse & Dolphin Yard.
Credit: Colonel Warden
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Swears & Wells Ltd at 192 Regent Street, ’Ladies Modes’ (1925) Originally in Regent Street, the store moved to Oxford Street in the 1930s and became a national chain of furriers. This original Regent Street location became Hamleys. Swear and Wells is a department store in Terry Pratchett’s Discworld novels - a rival to Crumley’s and Horrids. It is renowned for its upmarket food hall which boasts an unparalleled selection of imported Überwaldean food and drink.
Credit: Bishopsgate Institute
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