Luther Road, TW11

Buildings in this area date from the nineteenth century or before

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(51.42818 -0.33689, 51.428 -0.336) 
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Road · Strawberry Hill · TW11 ·
MAY
16
2017

Luther Road is a road in the TW11 postcode area

A lot of the street information research on this website is academic in nature - from university research, the Survey of London, British History Online, borough conservation areas and more. Occasionally, the Hive Mind comes up trumps - these derivations come from discoveries on the Wikipedia made during 2019 which is feeding into the project.


If we find any derivations dubious here, we remove them. With that proviso, the TUM project provides them here for your enjoyment...


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Gainsborough Road, Kew Thomas Gainsborough the artist is buried in St Anne's Church, Kew
Galen Place – after Ancient Greek physician Galen, by connection with the Pharmaceutical Society whose examination hall formerly stood here [Bloomsbury]
Galway Street – after Henri de Massue, Earl of Galway, first governor of the French Hospital that was formerly here [Finsbury]
Gambia Street – unknown; formerly William Street [Southwark]
Ganton Street – unknown, though possibly after Ganton, North Yorkshire; prior to 1886 this was three separate streets - Cross Street, Cross Court and South Row [Soho]
Garbutt Place – named in 1894 after William Garbutt, local vestry clerk and later borough town clerk [Marylebone]
Gard Street – after a member of the nearby Orphan Working School [Finsbury]
Garden Court – after the adjacent Temple Gardens [City of London]
Gardner’s Lane – unknown, though thought to be after a local property owner; formerly called Dunghill Lane in the 18th century [City of London]
Garlick Hill – as it led to the former Garlick Hythe, a wharf where garlic was unloaded from ships [City of London]
Garnault Mews and Garnault Street – after Samuel Garnault, 18th century treasurer of the New River Company [Clerkenwell]
Garrett Street – after a person of this name who was a member of the local parish vestry Works Committee [Finsbury]
Garrick Street and Garrick Yard – after David Garrick, successful actor of the 18th century [Covent Garden]
Garth Road Merton A Sir Richard Garth became the owner and Lord of the Manor of Morden just after the Dissolution of the Monasteries and maintained their connection with the parish for the next four centuries, until the manor was sold by another Sir Richard Garth in 1872.
Gateforth Street – possibly for Gateforth in Yorkshire, though why this named was chosen (in 1914) in unknown [Lisson Grove]
Gatliff Road – after John (or Charles) Gatliff, secretary of the Metropolitan Association for Improving the Dwellings of the Industrious Classes [Belgravia]
Gayfere Street – after Thomas Gayfere, mason, who worked on Westminster Abbey in the early 19th century [Westminster]
Gee Street – after its 1784 builder, Osgood Gee [Finsbury]
General Gordon Square Greenwich Charles George Gordon General born in Woolwich, who trained at the nearby Royal Military Academy. The road was originally called General Gordon Place until 2011, when it was redeveloped and renamed.
General Wolfe Road Greenwich James Wolfe General and conqueror of Quebec, who is buried in St Alfege's Church, Greenwich and has a memorial in Greenwich Park. He lived in a house called Macartney House near the road.
George Court – after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, 17th century courtier, who acquired York House which formerly stood on this site; his son sold the area to developers on condition that his father and titles were commemorated on the new streets [Strand]
George Gillett Court – for George Gillett, local politician in the early 20th century [Finsbury]
George Inn Yard – after the adjacent George Inn [Southwark]
George Mews – presumably for the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
George Peabody Court – after George Peabody, American philanthropist [Lisson Grove]
George Street – after king George III, reigning king when the street was built [Marylebone]
George Street Croydon Saint George Took its name from a former pub called the George and Dragon which stood in Croydon, and named after the saint (not from a former church dedicated to the saint). The present George pub in Croydon is its successor
George Street Richmond upon Thames King George III Main street of Richmond. Took current name in king's honour 1769. Formerly known as Richmond High Street.
George V Avenue Harrow King George V The road was built shortly before the Second World War and named in memory of the monarch, who died in 1936. Between Hatch End and Harrow.
George Yard – after the adjacent George and Vulture pub, [231] or another pub of this name formerly located here [City of London]
George Yard EC3 - Now the courtyard of Barclay's banks H.Q. Was first an ordinary house that was converted into a public house called 'The George'. Destroyed in the great fire of 1666, becoming a George Yard – probably after John George, local 18th century glazier and builder [Mayfair]
Geraldine Street – after the nearby Geraldine Mary Harmsworth Park, named for the mother of 20th century newspaper proprietor Harold Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Rothermere [Lambeth]
Gerrard Place – after Charles Gerard, 1st Earl of Macclesfield, who owned this land when the street as built in the 1680s; the form ‘Gerrard’ developed in the 19th century [Chinatown]
Gerrard Street – after Charles Gerard, 1st Earl of Macclesfield, who owned this land when the street as built in the 1680s; the form ‘Gerrard’ developed in the 19th century [Chinatown]
Gilbert Street – unknown; formerly James Street [Mayfair]
Gillingham Mews – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Victoria]
Gillingham Row – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Victoria]
Gillingham Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Victoria]
Giltspur Street – thought to be the former location of a spurriers [City of London]
Gladstone Street – after William Ewart Gladstone, Victorian-era Prime Minister [Lambeth]
Glasshill Street – after the former glassworks located here; formerly just Hill Street [Southwark]
Glasshouse Street – after a former glass factory on this site [Soho]
Glasshouse Walk – after the former Vauxhall Glassworks here, which thrived in the 1700s [Vauxhall]
Glasshouse Yard – after a 17th-century glass factory on this site [Farringdon]
Glentworth Street – after Edmund Pery, 1st Earl of Limerick (Lord Glentworth), 18th – 19th century politician and local resident [Lisson Grove]
Globe Street – after the former inn here of this name, possibly named for the Globe Theatre [Southwark]
Gloucester Gate – after Princess Mary, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh, sister of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Gloucester Gate Bridge – after Princess Mary, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh, sister of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Gloucester Gate Mews – after Princess Mary, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh, sister of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Gloucester Place – after Prince William, Duke of Cumberland, Duke of Gloucester, son of King George II [Marylebone]
Gloucester Place Mews – after Prince William, Duke of Cumberland, Duke of Gloucester, son of King George II [Marylebone]
Gloucester Road Kensington Maria, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh Formerly called Hogmore Lane; renamed in 1826 after the duchess who built a house in the road in 1805, and now demolished
Gloucester Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Victoria]
Gloucester Way – after Thomas Lloyd Baker, local landowner, who also owned Hardwicke Court in Gloucester [Clerkenwell]
Godliman Street – thought to be after Godalming, Surrey, a family bearing this name, or the selling of godalmins (a type of skin/leather); it was formerly Paul’s Chain, after the chain placed here to prevent access to St Paul’s churchyard [City of London]
Golborne Road Kensington and Chelsea Dean Golbourne One time vicar of St. John's Church in Paddington.
Golden Lane – formerly Goldynglane, thought to be after a local property owner of the name Golding/Golda [City of London]
Golden Square – believed to be a corruption of ‘gelding’, after Gelding’s Close, a field in the site prior to the square’s creation in 1670 [Soho]
Goldington Crescent - formerly part of the Duke of Bedford's Figs Mead Estate (later Bedford New Town), who also owned land in Goldington, Bedfordshire [Somers Town]
Goldington Street - formerly part of the Duke of Bedford's Figs Mead Estate (later Bedford New Town), who also owned land in Goldington, Bedfordshire [Somers Town]
Goldsmith Street – after the nearby Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths [City of London]
Goodge Place – after John Goodge, local landowner in the 18th century [Fitzrovia]
Goodge Street W1- Named after John Goodge a carpenter. He was a speculative builder of the houses which form the street in the late 18th century. His two nephews developed Crab Tree Fields forming Goodge Street in 1740.
Goodman’s Court and Goodman’s Yard – thought to be after the Goodman family, local farmers in the 16th century [City of London]
Gophir Lane – formerly Gofaire Lane, thought to be for Elias Gofaire, 14th century property owner [City of London]
Gordon Square – after Cosmo George Gordon, 3rd Duke of Gordon, grandfather of Lady Georgiana, wife of local landowner John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Gordon Street – after Cosmo George Gordon, 3rd Duke of Gordon, grandfather of Lady Georgiana, wife of local landowner John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Goring Street – unknown; prior to 1885 known as Castle Court, after a former inn [City of London]
Goslett Yard – named after A Goslett & Co, builders' merchants, who occupied a building nearby on Charing Cross Road; formerly George Yard [Soho]
Gossage Road, Uxbridge Street built near the site of the former RAF Uxbridge, and named after an air marshal in the Second World War. Leslie Gossage was Inspector-General of the RAF and Air Member for Personnel.
Goswell Place – there is dispute over the origins of the name, with some sources claiming the road was named after a nearby garden called 'Goswelle' or 'Goderell' which belonged to Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk, [69] whilst others state it derives from God's Well, and the traditional pagan practice of well-worship, or else a former 'Gode Well' located here [Clerkenwell]
Goswell Road – there is dispute over the origins of the name, with some sources claiming the road was named after a nearby garden called 'Goswelle' or 'Goderell' which belonged to Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk, whilst others state it derives from God's Well, and the traditional pagan practice of well-worship, or a former 'Gode Well' located here [Finsbury]
Gough Square – after Richard Gough, wool merchant, local landowners in the early 1700s [City of London]
Gough Street – after Richard Gough, wool merchant and local landowner in the early 18th century [Clerkenwell]
Gower Court – after Gertrude Leveson-Gower, wife of local landowner John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Gower Mews – after Gertrude Leveson-Gower, wife of local landowner John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Gower Place – after Gertrude Leveson-Gower, wife of local landowner John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Gower Street Camden Gertrude Leveson-Gower Wife of the 4th Duke of Bedford, who supervised the laying of the street.
Gracechurch Street – formerly Garscherch Street, Grass Church Street and Gracious Street, presumably after a local church (mostly likely St Benet Gracechurch and/or grassy area [City of London]
Grafton Mews – after local landowners the dukes of Grafton [Fitzrovia]
Grafton Place - originally part of the Duke of Grafton's FitzRoy Estate [Somers Town]
Grafton Street – after the Dukes of Grafton, who owned a town house near here in the 18th century [Mayfair]
Grafton Way W1 - The second Duke of Grafton wanted a short cut transporting his cattle from Paddington to Islington. With a few farmers and friends he won a petition from parliament to build a turnpike along which is present day Grafton Way.
Graham Terrace – after its 19th century lessee/builder William Graham [Belgravia]
Grahame Park Way Barnet Claude Grahame-White Founded the Grahame-White Aviation Company near the site of the road in 1911
Granby Terrace – after John Manners, Marquess of Granby, noted Georgian-era military commander [Regent’s Park]
Grange Court – thought to a descriptive name dating from the Middle Ages when this was farmland [Holborn]
Grantham Place – after John (or Thomas) Grantham, local builder in the 18th century [Mayfair]
Granville Place – probably after Granville George Leveson-Gower, 2nd Earl Granville, prominent Victorian politician [Marylebone]
Granville Square and Granville Street – after Granville Sharp, notable opponent of the slave trade; he was the uncle of Mary Sharp, who married local landowner Thomas Lloyd Baker [Clerkenwell]
Grape Street – formerly 'Vine Street', both in reference to a former vineyard on this site probably belonging to the former St Giles hospital [Covent Garden]
Gravel Lane – descriptive, after its gravelly texture [City of London]
Gray’s Inn Place, Gray's Inn Road and Gray's Inn Square – from Lord Gray of Wilton, owner of a local inn or town house which was later leased to lawyers in the 16th century [Holborn]
Gray’s Inn Road – from Lord Gray of Wilton, owner of a local inn or town house which was later leased to lawyers in the 16th century [Hatton Garden]
Gray’s Yard – after Edward Gray, local leaseholder of the 18th century [Marylebone]
Gray's Inn Road WC1 - John de Gray gave this land now covered by the Gray's Inn law chambers to St Bartholemew's Priory in the year 1314, and it was given that masses would be said for his soul.
Great Bell Alley – formerly just Bell Alley, it was named for a former inn [City of London]
Great Castle Street – after the former nearby pub The Castle [Fitzrovia]
Great Central Street – after the adjacent Marylebone railway station, originally the terminus of the Great Central Railway [Lisson Grove]
Great Chapel Street – this formerly approached a Huguenot chapel on the corner with Sheraton Street (then called Little Chapel Street) [Soho]
Great College Street, College Mews and Little College Street – after Westminster School, formerly known as St Peter’s College, Westminster [Westminster]
Great Cumberland Mews and Great Cumberland Place – after Prince William, Duke of Cumberland, son of King George II; it was formerly Tyburn Gate, after the brook that ran here [Marylebone]
Great Dover Street – as this formed part of the traditional London to Dover road [Southwark]
Great George Street and Little George Street – after either George II, reigning king when the street was built in 1750 or a former inn here called The George [Westminster]
Great Guildford Street – after Suffolk House, owned by Lady Jane Guildford in the early Tudor period; possibly also in allusion to Guildford, county town of Surrey [Southwark]
Great James Street – after James Burgess, assistant to local landowners the Brownlow family [Bloomsbury]
Great Marlborough Street – after John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, 17th – 18th century general [Soho]
Great Maze Pond – after the Medieval Maze Manor here, named for a prominent maze in its grounds [Southwark]
Great New Street - built in the mid-1600s, and named simply because it was then new [City of London]
Great Newport Street – after Mountjoy Blount, Earl of Newport (Isle of Wight), who owned a house on what is now Chinatown’s Little Newport Street (then just Newport Street) in the 17th century. Following the construction of Charing Cross Road Newport Street was split in two and the two sections renamed as they are today [Covent Garden]
Great Ormond Street – thought to commemorate James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde, prominent 17th century soldier [Bloomsbury]
Great Percy Street – after Robert Percy Smith, 19th century MP who was a director of the New River Company [Clerkenwell]
Great Percy Street Islington Robert Percy Smith A director of the New River Company, who developed the area, including the circus.
Great Peter Street SW1 - Great Peter Street bears the name of the patron saint of Westminster Abbey. St Peter at Westminster is the formal name of Westminster Abbey.
Great Portland Street – after the Dukes of Portland, who owned much of this land following the marriage of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland to heiress Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland in 1734 [Fitzrovia]
Great Queen Street – laid out in the 16th century and named in honour of the contemporary royal family; the ‘Great’ prefix was added to contrast with Little Queen Street which formerly adjoined [Covent Garden]
Great Russell Street – after local landowner the Russells, Dukes of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Great Scotland Yard – site of a house used by visiting monarchs of Scotland until the 13th century [Westminster]
Great Smith Street and Little Smith Street – after John Smith, circa 1700 builder of these streets [Westminster]
Great St Helen’s – after the adjacent St Helen's Church, Bishopsgate and former priory here of the same name [City of London]
Great St Thomas Apostle – after the St Thomas the Apostle church, destroyed in the Great Fire [City of London]
Great Suffolk Street – after Suffolk House, home to Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk in the Tudor period [Southwark]
Great Sutton Street and Sutton Lane – after Thomas Sutton, who founded the nearby Charterhouse School in 1611 [Clerkenwell]
Great Swan Alley – after a former inn here called The White Swan [City of London]
Great Titchfield Street and Little Titchfield Street – after Titchfield, Hampshire, where local landowners dukes of Portland owned land [Fitzrovia]
Great Tower Street – after the adjacent Tower of London [City of London]
Great Trinity Lane, Little Trinity Lane and Trinity Lane – after the former Holy Trinity the Less church, demolished 1871 [City of London]
Great Turnstile WC1 - In the 17th century, there stood a revolving barrier that did allow pedestrians to pass from Holborn into Lincolns Inn Fields.
Great Turnstile, Little Turnstile Street and New Turnstile Gate – after turnstiles that stood here in the 17th century [Holborn]
Great Winchester Street – following the Dissolution of the Monasteries, the nearby Austin Friars was acquired by Sir William Powlet, Lord Treasurer; his son Lord Winchester renamed it for himself [City of London]
Great Windmill Street – after a windmill that formerly stood near here in Ham Yard n the 17th century; the ‘great’ prefix was to distinguish it from Little Windmill Street, now Lexington Street [Soho]
Greek Court – after the Greek refugees, and the church they built nearby, who came here fleeing Ottoman rule in the 17th century [Soho]
Greek Street – after the Greek refugees, and the church they built nearby, who came here fleeing Ottoman rule in the 17th century [Soho]
Green Arbour Court – thought to be from a 17th-century inn [City of London]
Green Dragon Court – after a Tudor-era inn here of this name [Southwark]
Green Street – after John Green, local builder of the 18th century [Mayfair]
Green Terrace and Green Yard – possibly after the adjacent Spa Green, or instead John Grene, Clerk to the New River Company in the late 1600s [Clerkenwell]
Green’s Court – after the paviour Thomas Green, who leased land here from Edward Wardour in 1685 [Soho]
Greencoat Place – after the Green Coat School which formerly stood here, named for the colour of the school's uniform, demolished 1877 [Westminster]
Greencoat Row – after the Green Coat School which formerly stood here, named for the colour of the school's uniform, demolished 1877 [Westminster]
Greenhill’s Rents – after John Greenhill, local 18th century property owner [Farringdon]
Greenwell Street – after the locally prominent Greenwell family [Fitzrovia]
Grendon Street – this land was in Medieval times owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem; the street is named for Walter Grendon, Grand Prior 1400–16 [Lisson Grove]
Grenville Street – after William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville, prominent 19th century politician [Bloomsbury]
Gresham Street – after Thomas Gresham (1519–1579), merchant and founder the Royal Exchange; the western part of this street was formerly known as Lad Lane, and the eastern part Cat Eaton Street (named literally after the cats here); they were amalgamated and the street created in 1845 [City of London]
Gresse Street – built by the Swiss local resident Peter Gaspard Gresse in the 1760s [Fitzrovia]
Greville Street – from Fulke Greville, 1st Baron Brooke, who owned a house near here in the 17th century [Hatton Garden]
Greycoat Place – after the Grey Coat School for Children which moved here in 1701 [Westminster]
Greycoat Street – after the Grey Coat School for Children which moved here in 1701 [Westminster]
Greyfriars Passage – after the Franciscan order, also known as the Grey friars, who owned land here in the Middle Ages [City of London]
Greyhound Court – thought to be after a former inn of this name [Holborn]
Greystoke Place – after a local 18th century property owner of this name; prior to this it was Black Raven Alley, after a local inn [City of London]
Grindal Street – for Edmund Grindal, 16th century archbishop, by association with the nearby Lambeth Palace [Waterloo]
Grocer’s Hall Court – after the adjacent Worshipful Company of Grocers [City of London]
Grocer’s Hall Gardens – after the adjacent Worshipful Company of Grocers [City of London]
Groom Place – after a former pub here called the Horse and Groom [Belgravia]
Grosvenor Cottages - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave) [Belgravia]
Grosvenor Crescent - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave) [Belgravia]
Grosvenor Crescent Mews - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave) [Belgravia]
Grosvenor Gardens - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave) [Belgravia]
Grosvenor Gardens Mews North - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave) [Belgravia]
Grosvenor Gardens Mews South - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave) [Belgravia]
Grosvenor Gate - after the Grosvenors, former local landowners [Mayfair]
Grosvenor Hill Westminster The Grosvenor Family - Dukes of Westminster.
Grosvenor Place - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave) [Belgravia]
Grosvenor Road - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave) [Belgravia]
Grosvenor Square Westminster The Grosvenor Family - Dukes of Westminster. Owners of the land on which the Square is built.
Grosvenor Street Westminster The Grosvenor Family - Dukes of Westminster.
Grotto Court – after Thomas Finch’s Grotto Grounds, 18th century pleasure grounds located near here [Southwark]
Grotto Passage – site of a former shell grotto owned by John Castle, closed circa 1760 [Marylebone]
Guildable Bridge Street – the term ‘Guildable’ is first recorded in 1377, refers to the collection of taxes there and was adopted to distinguish this from the other manors of the Southwark area [Southwark]
Guildhall Buildings – after the adjacent Guildhall [City of London]
Guildhall Yard – after the adjacent Guildhall [City of London]
Guildhouse Street – after the Guild House, which formerly stood near here on Eccleston Square from 1922-46 [24] [Victoria]
Guilford Place – after Prime Minister Lord North, 2nd Earl of Guildford, who was also President of the nearby Foundling Hospital from 1771 until his death [Bloomsbury]
Guilford Street – after Prime Minister Lord North, 2nd Earl of Guildford, who was also President of the nearby Foundling Hospital from 1771 until his death [Bloomsbury]
Gun Street E1 - Gunners at the Tower made their weekly repairs here on the former artillery ground.
Gutter Lane – corruption of Guthrun/Godrun, thought to be after an early Danish landowner [City of London]
Guy Street – after Thomas Guy, founder of Guy’s Hospital [Southwark]
Gwynne Place – after Nell Gwynne, mistress of Charles II, who lived near here [Clerkenwell]
Haddon Hall Street – after Haddon Hall, local religious mission named for Charles Haddon Spurgeon, noted Victorian-era preacher [Southwark]
Half Moon Court – after a former inn of this name [City of London]
Half Moon Sreet W1 - Deriving its name from a long lost tavern, renown for its considerable repute.
Halkin Arcade - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned Halkyn Castle in Wales [Belgravia]
Halkin Street W1 - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned Halkyn Castle in Flintshire.
Hall Street – after James and Joseph Hall who built the street in 1822 [Finsbury]
Hallam Mews – after Henry Hallam, 19th century historian who lived nearby [Marylebone]
Hallam Street W1 - Takes its name from the historian Henry Hallam who lived close by at No. 67 Wimpole Street.
Ham Yard – after the Ham tavern, now the Lyric, on the corner with Great Windmill Street [Soho]
Hambro Avenue Bromley Everard Hambro Banker who lived at Hayes Place, a former house on whose estate the road was later built.
Hamilton Mews – built on land belonging to Mr Hamilton, ranger of Hyde Park during the reign King Charles II [Mayfair]
Hamilton Place – built on land belonging to Mr Hamilton, ranger of Hyde Park during the reign King Charles II [Mayfair]
Hamilton Road, Hardy Road and Nelson Road Merton Nearby streets commemorate Admiral Horatio Nelson and those most famously connected to him. Emma Hamilton - his mistress and prominent society model and courtier.
Hammett Street – after its 18th century builder Benjamin Hammett, also Lord Mayor of London in 1797 [City of London]
Hampden Gurney Street – after Reverend John Hampden Gurney, rector of St Mary's, Bryanston Square in the mid-19th century [Marylebone]
Hampstead Road - as it leads to the north London district of this name [Regent’s Park]
Hand Court – thought to be from a former shop sign advertising gloves or a tailors [Holborn]
Handel Close Harrow George Frideric Handel Well-known German composer who was employed by the Duke of Chandos at Canons Park and reputedly played on the organ of St Lawrence's church nearby. The road was built on part of the estate
Handel Street – after the 18th century composter George Frederick Handel, a benefactor of the nearby Foundling Hospital and organist at its chapel [Bloomsbury]
Hanging Sword Alley EC4 - John Stow says, ‘Then is Water Lane, running down, by the west side of a house called the Hanging Sword, to the Thames.’ Stow remarks can certainly be traced back to the 1560s and the Alley was probably here long before that, when it was known as Ouldwood Alley and formed part of the Bishop of Salisbury's estate.
Hankey Place – after Donald Hankey, prominent member of the local Edwardian-era charitable organisation the Oxford and Bermondsey Club [Southwark]
Hanover Gate – after the House of Hanover, reigning dynasty when the square and street were built in 1713 [Regent’s Park]
Hanover Place – after the Royal House of Hanover; formerly Phoenix Place [Covent Garden]
Hanover Square – after the House of Hanover, reigning dynasty when the square and street were built in 1713 [Mayfair]
Hanover Street – after the House of Hanover, reigning dynasty when the square and street were built in 1713 [Mayfair]
Hanover Terrace – after the House of Hanover, reigning dynasty when the square and street were built in 1713 [Regent’s Park]
Hanover Terrace Mews – after the House of Hanover, reigning dynasty when the square and street were built in 1713 [Regent’s Park]
Hanseatic Walk – presumably in reference to Hanseatic League [City of London]
Hanson Street – after a nearby hospital, opening by Lord Mayor Sir Reginald Hanson in 1887 [Fitzrovia]
Hanway Place and Hanway Street – after Thomas Hanway, commissioner with the navy, who owned this land in the early 18th century [Fitzrovia]
Hanway Place W1 - Major John Hanway appears in the rate-books from 1710 and the street itself appearers in the rate-books in 1725.
Hanway Street W1 - Major John Hanway appears in the rate-books from 1710 and the street itself appearers in the rate-books in 1725.
Harcourt Street – after John Harcourt, local landowner and resident in the 18th century [Marylebone]
Hardwick Mews – after Thomas Lloyd Baker, local landowner, who also owned Hardwicke Court in Gloucester [Clerkenwell]
Hardwick Street – after Thomas Lloyd Baker, local landowner, who also owned Hardwicke Court in Gloucester [Clerkenwell]
Hardwidge Street – after James Hardwidge, local 18th century needlemaker and church benefactor [Southwark]
Hardy Road Merton Nearby streets commemorate Admiral Horatio Nelson and those most famously connected to him. Thomas Hardy under his command as Flag Captain of HMS Victory.
Hare Place – after Hare House which formerly stood here; formerly Ram Alley, a noted criminal area, prompting the name change [City of London]
Harewood Avenue and Harewood Row – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Emma Portman, Viscountess Portman, daughter of Henry Lascelles, 2nd Earl of Harewood, wife of Edward Portman, 1st Viscount Portman [Lisson Grove]
Harewood Place – after Ahrwood House, residence of the Earls of Harewood in the 19th century [Mayfair]
Harley Place – after Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland, Lady Margaret Harley, wife of the duke of Portman, landowner [Marylebone]
Harley Street Westminster Robert Harley, 1st Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer Was the 1st Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer and had one son, Edward Harley
Harleyford Road – after local leaseholders the Claytons, whose country house was Harleyford Manor, Buckinghamshire [Vauxhall]
Harp Alley – thought to be after a former 17th century inn of this name [City of London]
Harp Lane – after the Harp brewhouse which formerly stood here [City of London]
Harper Road – unknown; it was changed from Union Road to avoid confusion with similarly named streets, and before that it was Horsemonger Lane, after the local horse dealers [Southwark]
Harpur Mews – after either local 18th century landowner Peter Harpur [82] or Sir William Harpur, founder of the Bedford School [Bloomsbury]
Harpur Street – after either local 18th century landowner Peter Harpur [82] or Sir William Harpur, founder of the Bedford School [Bloomsbury]
Harriet Street – after Harriet Lowndes of the Lowndes family, former local landowners [Belgravia]
Harriet Walk – after Harriet Lowndes of the Lowndes family, former local landowners [Belgravia]
Harrington Road, Harrington Gardens, Stanhope Gardens, Petersham Lane, Petersham Mews and Petersham Place Kensington and Chelsea Earls of Harrington Owned the area on which the road was later built. The family continued to own it until 1957.
Harrington Street - as this land was formerly owned by Dukes of Bedford; Francis Russell, 7th Duke of Bedford was married to Anna Russell, Duchess of Bedford, daughter of Charles Stanhope, 3rd Earl of Harrington [Regent’s Park]
Harrison Street – after local 18th – 19th century landowners and brickmakers the Harrison family [Bloomsbury]
Harrow Place – thought to be named for a harrow-making shop formerly located here after a former inn of this name [City of London]
Harrow Street – this land was formerly owned by Harrow School [Lisson Grove]
Harrowby Street W1 – after Dudley Ryder, 1st Earl of Harrowby, early 19th century politician, by association with the Cato Street conspiracy at which he would have been killed had it succeeded [Marylebone]
Hart Street – unknown, formerly Herthstrete and Hertstrete, possibly after the hearthstone trade here [City of London]
Hartshorn Alley – after the Hart’s Horn inn which formerly stood here [City of London]
Hastings Street – after Hastings in Sussex, near to Kent, home county of local 16th century landowner Andrew Judd [Bloomsbury]
Hat and Mitre Court – after an 18th-century tavern of this name [Farringdon]
Hatfields – as fur hats were formerly made here [Waterloo]
Hatherley Street – after William Page Wood, 1st Baron Hatherley, Victorian era politician and local resident [Westminster]
Hatton Garden Camden Sir Christopher Hatton, Lord Chancellor Most of estate leased to Hatton by Elizabeth I in 1581, following a vacancy in the position of Bishop of Ely, whom she appointed. Holborn.
Hatton Place – from Sir Christopher Hatton, who was ceded much of this area from the Bishops of Ely by Elizabeth I in 1577-1580 [Hatton Garden]
Hatton Row – thought to be after a local builder of this name [Lisson Grove]
Hatton Street – thought to be after a local builder of this name [Lisson Grove]
Hatton Wall – from Sir Christopher Hatton, who was ceded much of this area from the Bishops of Ely by Elizabeth I in 1577-1580 [Hatton Garden]
Haunch of Venison Yard – after a former 18th century inn near here [Mayfair]
Havelock Road, Croydon Group of five roads built on the site of the East India Company Military Seminary by the British Land Company, and named after prominent figures in the history of British India. Havelock was a general in India during the 1851 rebellion.
Hay Hill – after the Hay Hill farm which formerly stood here; the farm was originally ‘Aye farm’, after the nearby Aye Brook [Mayfair]
Hay’s Lane – after the Hays family, who owned nearby Hay’s Wharf [Southwark]
Hay’s Mews – after the Hay Hill farm which formerly stood here; the farm was originally ‘Aye farm’, after the nearby Aye Brook [Mayfair]
Haydon Street and Haydon Walk – after John Heydon, Master of the Ordnance 1627-42, who lived near here [City of London]
Hayes Place – after the developer of this street Francis Hay, who lived in Hayes, Middlesex [Lisson Grove]
Hayles Buildings – after the Hayles family, former local landowner [Lambeth]
Hayles Street – after the Hayles family, former local landowner [Lambeth]
Haymarket – site of a former market selling hay until the 1830s [Soho]
Haymarket – site of a former market selling hay until the 1830s [St James's]
Hayne Street – after Haynes timber merchants and carpenters, who owned a shop here after a former inn of this name [City of London]
Hayward’s Place – after James Hayward, local 19th century landowner and ironmonger [Clerkenwell]
Headfort Place – after Thomas Taylour, 3rd Marquess of Headfort, who lived nearby on Belgrave Square [Belgravia]
Heath Road, Harrow Part of a cluster of streets named after teachers and headmasters of Harrow School: Benjamin Heath (1771–1785).
Heathcock Court – thought to be after a former inn of this name [Covent Garden]
Heathcote Street – after Michael Heathcote, governor of the nearby Foundling Hospital in the early 19th century [Bloomsbury]
Heddon Street – after William Pulteney (later also Baron Heddon), local 18th century landowner [Mayfair]
Helmet Row – after the Worshipful Company of Ironmongers, who owned this land; their arms incorporates a helmet motif [Finsbury]
Hen and Chicken Court – after a former inn(s) here of this name [City of London]
Heneage Lane – after Thomas Heneage, who acquired a house here after the dissolution of the nearby abbey [City of London]
Heneage Place – after Thomas Heneage, who acquired a house here after the dissolution of the nearby abbey [City of London]
Henrietta Mews – named after Foundling Hospital vice-president (mid-19th century) Sir Stephen Gaselee’s wife Henrietta [Bloomsbury]
Henrietta Place – after Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer, daughter of Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne [Marylebone]
Henrietta Street – named after Henrietta Maria, consort of Charles I, reigning king when the street was built in 1631 [Covent Garden]
Henriques Street E1 Basil Henriques 1890–1961 Location of a social club run by philanthropist Henriques. Once named Berner Street with the name changed after Jack the Rippers third victim, and subsequently named after Sir Basil Henriques.
Herbal Hill and Herbal Place – after a former herb garden near here belonging to the Bishops of Ely, former local landowners [Clerkenwell]
Herbrand Street – after local landowner Herbrand Arthur Russell, 11th Duke of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Hercules Road – after Hercules House, built by late 18th century circus owner Philip Astley after one of his favourite circus acts [Lambeth]
Hermit Street – after a hermitage established here in 1511 by the Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem [Clerkenwell]
Herrick Street – after Robert Herrick, 17th century poet [Westminster]
Hertford Place – after Isabella FitzRoy, Duchess of Grafton, Marchioness of Hertford, part of the local landowning Fitzroy family [Fitzrovia]
Hertford Street – after a former local inn named after the Seymours, Marquesses of Hertford [Mayfair]
High Holborn – thought to be from ‘hollow bourne’ i.e. the river Fleet which formerly flowed in a valley near here. The ‘High’ stems from the fact that the road led away from the river to higher ground. [Bloomsbury]
High Timber Street – after a former timber hythe (wharf), recorded here from the late 13th century [City of London]
Hill Street – after the Hay Hill farm which formerly stood here; the farm was originally ‘Aye farm’, after the nearby Aye Brook [Mayfair]
Hills Place – thought to be after local resident in the 1860s TH Hills; formerly Queen Street [Soho]
Hinde Mews – after Jacob Hinde, husband of Anne Thayer, who inherited this land from her father Thomas Thayer [Marylebone]
Hinde Street – after Jacob Hinde, husband of Anne Thayer, who inherited this land from her father Thomas Thayer [Marylebone]
Hobart Place – named after Robert Hobart, 4th Earl of Buckinghamshire, who lived nearby on Grosvenor Place [Belgravia]
Hobhouse Court – after Sir John Cam Hobhouse, Victorian MP and arts patron [Soho]
Hogarth Court – the artist William Hogarth formerly lodged here at a local tavern [City of London]
Hogarth Lane Hounslow William Hogarth Painter, who is buried in the parish church, and whose house, now a museum, is in the road. Chiswick.
Holbein Mews – after Hans Holbein the Younger, who painted local families for a period in the 1520s. [Belgravia]
Holbein Place – after Hans Holbein the Younger, who painted local families for a period in the 1520s; its former name was The Ditch, as it lay next to the river Westbourne [Belgravia]
Holborn – thought to be from ‘hollow bourne’ i.e. the river Fleet which formerly flowed in a valley near here [Hatton Garden]
Holborn Circus – thought to be from ‘hollow bourne’ i.e. the river Fleet which formerly flowed in a valley near here. The ‘High’ stems from the fact that rode led away from the river to higher ground. Circus is a British term for a road junction. [Holborn]
Holborn Place – thought to be from ‘hollow bourne’ i.e. the river Fleet which formerly flowed in a valley near here. The ‘High’ stems from the fact that rode led away from the river to higher ground. [Holborn]
Holford Mews, Holdford Place and Holford Street – after the Holford family, who worked on the New River) scheme in the 18th century [Clerkenwell]
Holland Park Avenue and Villas Road Kensington and Chelsea Henry Rich, 1st Earl of Holland First owner of Holland House and Holland Park, to the east of the road.
Holland Road Kensington and Chelsea Henry Rich, 1st Earl of Holland First owner of Holland House and Holland Park, to the east of the road.
Holland Street SE1 - In 1630 Elizabeth Holland (Madam Holland) opened her first-class brothel establishment Hollands Leaguer, on the site now covered by Hopton Street and Holland Street. The brothel was surrounded by a moat, gatehouse and drawbridge with plesant walks alongside trees and shrubberies in what was once Paris Gardens House; covering the area now known as Paris Gardens.
Holland Villas Road Kensington and Chelsea Henry Rich, 1st Earl of Holland First owner of Holland House and Holland Park, to the east of the road.
Hollen Street – after its builder Allen Hollen, in the 18th century [Soho]
Holles Street – after John Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, who bought the local estate in 1708 [Marylebone]
Holyrood Street – after the former Rood (cross) of Bermondsey located here; it was destroyed in 1559 [Southwark]
Homer Row – named by local landowner John Harcourt, either in honour of the ancient Greek poet Homer or his neighbour Edward Homer, possibly both [Marylebone]
Homer Street – named by local landowner John Harcourt, either in honour of the ancient Greek poet Homer or his neighbour Edward Homer, possibly both [Marylebone]
Honduras Street – the streets here were built by a timber merchant circa 1810 who named them after trade-related activities; Honduras was a source of mahogany [Finsbury]
Honey Lane – after honey that was formerly sold here as art of the Cheapside market [City of London]
Honor Oak SE5 - At the summit of this road there was a tree known as the Oak of Honour, where Queen Elizabeth 1 on one of her excursions on horse back from Greenwich, dined beneath its shade. Many years later the oak was struck by lightning, and was replaced by a successor.
Hop Gardens – the abbey of St Peter used gardens near here to grow hops in the early Middle Ages [Covent Garden]
Hopkins Street – after Richard Hopkins, who owned a lease here in the early 18th century [Soho]
Hopton Street – after Charles Hopton, who funded the local almshouses here in the 18th century [Southwark]
Hopton's Gardens – after Charles Hopton, who funded the local almshouses here in the 18th century [Southwark]
Horse and Dolphin Yard – after the Horse and Dolphin inn which stood here in the 17th – 19th centuries [Chinatown]
Horse Guards Avenue – after the quarters of the Horse Guards, established on Whitehall in 1663 [Westminster]
Horse Guards Road – after the quarters of the Horse Guards, established on Whitehall in 1663 [Westminster]
Horseferry Road SW1 - The point where an ancient horse ferry took passengers from Thorney Island (Westminster) to Lamb Hythe (Lambeth) Where Lambeth bridge now stands. King James the II fleeing London threw the Great seal into the Thames at this point and was picked up by the Horse ferryman in 1688.
Horsemongers Mews – probably by association with the nearby Horsemongers Lane (now Harper Road) [Southwark]
Hosier Lane – after the former hosiery trade based here [291] [City of London]
Houghton Street – after John Holles, Second Baron Houghton, who built the street in the 1650s [Holborn]
Houndsditch – generally thought to be literally after a local ditch where dead dogs were dumped; however, others think it may refer to a nearby kennels [City of London]
Howick Place – thought to be named for Howick Cross, Lancashire [Westminster]
Howland Mews East and Howland Street – after Elizabeth Howland, who married Wriothesley Russell, 2nd Duke of Bedford, local landowner [Fitzrovia]
Hudson’s Place – after the Hudson's furniture depository formerly located here, founded by William Hudson [Victoria]
Huggin Court and Huggin Hill – formerly Hoggen Lane, as hogs were kept here [City of London]
Hugh Mews – after Hugh Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster, whose family owned much of the surrounding land (though Hugh was a common name in the family and another individual may have been intended) [Victoria]
Hugh Street – after Hugh Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster, whose family owned much of the surrounding land (though Hugh was a common name in the family and another individual may have been intended) [Victoria]
Hull Street – after its 18th century builder, William Hulls [Finsbury]
Hungerford Lane – after the Hungerford family, who owned a house on this site in the 15th century, later sold due to debts to create Hungerford Market, before the building of Charing Cross station [Strand]
Hungerford Road Camden Edward Hungerford Founder and owner of market. Co-source of Hungerford Bridge, arguably a street.
Hunt’s Court – after Samuel Hunt, local carpenter and leaseholder in the 17th century [Soho]
Hunter Street – after prominent 18th century surgeon John Hunter, by association with adjacent School of Medicine [Bloomsbury]
Huntley Street – after Cosmo George Gordon, 3rd Duke of Gordon, Marquess of Huntly grandfather of Lady Georgiana, wife of local landowner John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Huntsworth Mews – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Huntsworth, Somerset where they owned land [Lisson Grove]
Idol Lane – formerly Idle Lane, it may be a personal name or denote local idlers [City of London]
India Place – after the adjacent Indian High Commission [Holborn]
India Street – after the former warehouses here of the East India Company; prior to 1913 it was George Street [City of London]
Ingestre Place – after Lord Ingestre, who financed the building of an artisans’ block here in 1852; before this it was two streets – New Street and Husband Street, after Thomas Husbands, 18th century local building owner [Soho]
Ingle Mews – after William Inglebert, 17th century engineer who worked on the New River scheme [Clerkenwell]
Inglebert Street – after William Inglebert, 17th century engineer who worked on the New River scheme [Clerkenwell]
Inigo Jones Road Greenwich Inigo Jones The road in Charlton within former estate of Charlton House with features by or in the style of Jones.
Inigo Place – after Inigo Jones, who designed much of the Covent Garden area in the 1630s [Covent Garden]
Inner Temple Lane – after the adjacent Inner Temple [City of London]
Ireland Yard – after haberdasher William Ireland, who owned a house here in the 1500s [City of London]
Ironmonger Lane – an ancient name, after the former ironmongery trade here [City of London]
Ironmonger Passage – after the Worshipful Company of Ironmongers, who owned this land [Finsbury]
Ironmonger Row – after the Worshipful Company of Ironmongers, who owned this land [Finsbury]
Irving Street – after Henry Irving, popular Victorian actor; the street was originally named Green Street, as it led to a bowling green near Leicester Square [181] [182]
Irving Street Westminster Henry Irving In London's Theatreland. Named after the first actor to be knighted
Ivor Place – unknown; formerly Upper Park Place [Lisson Grove]
Ivybridge Lane – named after a former ivy-covered bridge that crossed an old watercourse on this spot; the bridge was demolished sometime before 1600 [Strand]








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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Some street name derivations – The Underground Map   

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
Lived here
David James Bloomfield   
Added: 13 Jul 2021 11:54 GMT   

Hurstway Street, W10
Jimmy Bloomfield who played for Arsenal in the 1950s was brought up on this street. He was a QPR supporter as a child, as many locals would be at the time, as a teen he was rejected by them as being too small. They’d made a mistake

Reply
Comment
Added: 6 Jul 2021 05:38 GMT   

Wren Road in the 1950s and 60s
Living in Grove Lane I knew Wren Road; my grandfather’s bank, Lloyds, was on the corner; the Scout District had their office in the Congregational Church and the entrance to the back of the Police station with the stables and horses was off it. Now very changed - smile.

Reply

fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

Reply
Lived here
Kim Johnson   
Added: 24 Jun 2021 19:17 GMT   

Limehouse Causeway (1908)
My great grandparents were the first to live in 15 Tomlins Terrace, then my grandparents and parents after marriage. I spent the first two years of my life there. My nan and her family lived at number 13 Tomlins Terrace. My maternal grandmother lived in Maroon house, Blount Street with my uncle. Nan, my mum and her brothers were bombed out three times during the war.

Reply
Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply

NEARBY STREETS
Adelaide Road, TW11 Adelaide Road is one of a number of local roads to the west of Teddington station with royal connections.
Alice Mews, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Allbrook Close, TW11 Allbrook Close is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Arlington Passage, TW11 Arlington Passage is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Arlington Road, TW11 Arlington Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Belvedere Close, TW11 Belvedere Close is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Beverley Court, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Blackmores Grove, TW11 Blackmores Grove commemorates R.D. Blackmore, author of Lorna Doone, which he wrote in Teddington.
Blenheim Place, TW11 Blenheim Place is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Boucher Close, TW11 Boucher Close is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Bridge Close, TW11 Bridge Close is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Bridge House, TW11 Residential block
Bridgeman Road, TW11 Bridgeman Road commemorates Sir Orlando Bridgeman, Lord Keeper of the Seal from 1667 to 1672, whose house was between here and the High Street.
Broad Street, TW11 Broad Street is a main road of Teddington.
Bychurch End, TW11 Bychurch End is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Cadogan Close, TW11 Cadogan Close is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Cairngorm Close, TW11 Cairngorm Close lies off Vicarage Road.
Cambridge Crescent, TW11 Cambridge Crescent is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Cambridge Road, TW11 Cambridge Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Cavendish Court, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Cedar Road, TW11 Cedar Road was named after a house called The Cedars which it replaced.
Cedars Road, TW11 Cedars Road is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Cherrywood Court, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Chestnut Avenue, TW11 Chestnut Avenue is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Christchurch Avenue, TW11 Christchurch Avenue is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Church Grove Passage, TW11 Church Grove Passage is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Church Lane, TW11 Church Lane is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Church Road, TW11 Church Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Church Street, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Claremont Road, TW11 Claremont Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Clifton road, TW11 Clifton road is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Clonmel Road, TW11 Clonmel Road is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Coleshill Road, TW11 Coleshill Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Crieff Court, TW11 Crieff Court is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Dells Close, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Doone Close, TW11 R.D. Blackmore, author of Lorna Doone, lived at Gomer House which was situated where Doone Close is today.
Elfin Grove, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Elfin Lodge, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Elleray Road, TW11 Elleray Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Elmfield Avenue, TW11 Elmfield Avenue is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Elmtree Road, TW11 Elmtree Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Enterprise Way, TW11 Enterprise Way runs off Station Road.
Fallow Place, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Field Lane, TW11 Field Lane was part of an ancient pathway which led to Bushy Park and Hampton Court.
Fieldend, TW11 Fieldend is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Gloucester Court, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Gloucester Road, TW11 Gloucester Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Gomer Gardens, TW11 Gomer Gardens is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Gomer Place, TW11 Gomer Place is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Grove Terrace, TW11 Grove Terrace runs north from The Grove.
Hall Court, TW11 Hall Court is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Hampton Road, TW11 Hampton Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Henry Peters Drive, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
High Street, TW11 High Street is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Knaggs House, TW11 Residential block
Latimer Road, TW11 Latimer Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Laurel Road, TW11 Laurel Road is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Linden Grove, TW11 Linden Grove is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Little Queens Road, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Lower Ham Road, TW11 Lower Ham Road is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Luther Mews, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Mays Road, TW11 Mays Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Middle Lane, TW11 Middle Lane is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Noel Square, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
North Lane, TW11 North Lane is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
North Place, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Oakhurst Close, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Park Lane, TW11 Park Lane is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Park Street, TW11 Park Street is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Plough Lane, TW11 Plough Lane is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Princes Road, TW11 Princes Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Printers Mews, TW11 Printers Mews is a location in London.
Railway Road, TW11 Railway Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Regina Court, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Richmond Mews, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Sandy Lane, TW11 Sandy Lane is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Shacklegate Lane, TW11 Shacklegate Lane is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Somerset Gardens, TW11 Somerset Gardens is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Somerset Road, TW11 Somerset Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Springfield Road, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Stableyard Mews, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Stanley Gardens Road, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Stanley Road, TW11 Stanley Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Stanton Avenue, TW11 Stanton Avenue is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Station Road, TW11 Station Road was built to connect Teddington station to the High Street.
Stokes Mews, TW11 Stokes Mews is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Stuart Grove, TW11 Stuart Grove is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Sutherland Grove, TW11 Sutherland Grove is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Sydney Road, TW11 Sydney Road is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Teddington Business Park, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Teddington Hall, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Teddington Park, TW11 Teddington Park is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
The Causeway, TW11 The Causeway is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
The Cedars, TW11 The Cedars is a turning off of Adelaide Road.
The Grove, TW11 The Grove is part of the Grove Estate which was built on the site of an 18th century house called The Grove - demolished in 1920.
Thelma Grove, TW11 Thelma Grove is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Traherne Lodge, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Vicarage Road, TW11 Vicarage Road replaced a vicarage which was situated here.
Victor Road, TW11 Victor Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Wades Lane, TW11 Wades Lane is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Waldegrave Avenue, TW11 Waldegrave Avenue appears on maps between 1900 and 1950.
Waldegrave Road, TW11 Waldegrave Road is named after Frances Waldegrave and was the birthplace of Sir Noël Coward.
Walpole Crescent, TW11 Walpole Crescent is a road in the TW11 postcode area
Walpole Place, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Walpole Road, TW11 Walpole Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Watts Lane, TW11 Watts Lane is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
West End, TW11 A street within the TW11 postcode
Westminster Close, TW11 Westminster Close is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
White Heron Mews, TW11 White Heron Mews runs off Park Lane.
York Road, TW11 York Road is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.

NEARBY PUBS
Horse and Groom The Horse and Groom was situated at 11 Waldegrave Road.
Teddington Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Teddington Constitutional Club Ltd This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Abercorn Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Builders Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Clock House Pub This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hogarth This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Masons Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Strawberry Hill






LOCAL PHOTOS

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The Horse and Groom, Teddington. This pub was situated at the southern end of Waldegrave Road between the 1870s and 1996.
Old London postcard
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Portrait for Sir Noël Coward’s last Christmas Card in 1972. Despite his upper-class image, Coward was born into a solidly middle class family in Waldegrave Road, Teddington.
Credit: Sir Noël Coward
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