Staple Inn

Bathhouse in/near City of London, existing between 1549 and now

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Bathhouse · * · WC1V ·
JUNE
10
2018

Staple Inn is London’s only surviving sixteenth-century domestic building, situated on the south side of High Holborn.

Its timber-framed façade overhangs the roadway.

The building was once the wool staple, where wool was weighed and taxed. It was an Inn of Chancery built between 1545 to 1549. It survived the Great Fire of London and was restored in 1886 and reconstructed in 1937. It was extensively damaged by a Nazi German Luftwaffe aerial bomb in 1944 but was subsequently restored once more. It has a distinctive cruck roof and an internal courtyard.

It was originally attached to Gray’s Inn, which is one of the four Inns of Court. The Inns of Chancery fell into decay in the 19th century. All of them were dissolved, and most were demolished. Staple Inn is the only one which survives largely intact.

It was later rebuilt by the Prudential Insurance Company, and is now used by the Institute of Actuaries and various other companies.

The historic interiors include a great hall, used by the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. The ground floor street frontage is let to shops and restaurants, required to use plainer signage than they do on less sensitive buildings.

Old Holborn tobacco was originally produced in an alleyway on the north side of Holborn. Staple Inn formerly featured on tins and pouches of this product.

Staple Inn was an extra-parochial area until 1858 and then a civil parish. It became part of the Metropolitan Borough of Holborn in 1900 and was abolished in 1930.

On 1 April 1994 boundary changes meant that the Inn was transferred from the London Borough of Camden to the City of London (and the City ward of Farringdon Without).

It was designated a grade I listed building in 1974.


Main source: Staple Inn - Wikipedia
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

Reply
Reply
Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

Reply
Comment
Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

Reply

Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 08:59 GMT   

Spigurnell Road, N17
I was born and lived in Spigurnell Road no 32 from 1951.My father George lived in Spigurnell Road from 1930’s.When he died in’76 we moved to number 3 until I got married in 1982 and moved to Edmonton.Spigurnell Road was a great place to live.Number 32 was 2 up 2 down toilet out the back council house in those days

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Comment
Lewis   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 20:48 GMT   

Ploy
Allotment

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
City Temple The City Temple is a Nonconformist church on Holborn Viaduct.
Fleet Market The Fleet Market was a market erected in 1736 on the newly culverted River Fleet.
Lisle’s Tennis Court Lisle’s Tennis Court was a building off Portugal Street in Lincoln’s Inn Fields in London.
Old and New London: Temple Bar Temple Bar was rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren, in 1670–72.
Smithfield Smithfield is a locality in the ward of Farringdon Without situated at the City of London’s northwest corner.
St Andrew The Church of St Andrew, Holborn stands within the Ward of Farringdon Without.
St Etheldreda’s Church St Etheldreda’s Church is in Ely Place, off Charterhouse Street in Holborn, London.
Staple Inn Staple Inn is London’s only surviving sixteenth-century domestic building, situated on the south side of High Holborn.
Thavie’s Inn Thavie’s Inn was a former Inn of Chancery, associated with Lincoln’s Inn, established at Holborn, near the site of the present side street and office block still known as Thavies Inn Buildings.
The 1860s map of London "Stanford’s Library Map of London and its Suburbs" was published in 1862
Weston’s Music Hall Weston’s Music Hall was a music hall and theatre that opened in 1857. In 1906, the theatre became known as the Holborn Empire.

NEARBY STREETS
Atkin Building, WC1R Atkin Building is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Baldwins Gardens, EC1N Baldwin Gardens runs between Gray’s Inn Road and Leather Lane.
Barnard’s Inn, EC4A Barnard’s Inn lies near Holborn Circus.
Bartlett’s Buildings, EC4A Bartlett’s Buildings was the name of a street situated off of Holborn Circus
Bear Alley, EC4A Bear Alley is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Bedford Row, WC1R Bedford Row runs between Theobalds Road and Sandland Street.
Bell Yard, EC4A Bell Yard is a small lane off the Strand where the Bell hostel once stood.
Benjamin Street, EC1M Benjamin Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Bleeding Heart Yard, EC1N Bleeding Heart Yard is a courtyard off of Greville Street.
Bolt Court, EC4A Bolt Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Breams Buildings, EC4A Breams Buildings is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Bride Lane, EC4Y Bride Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Briset Street, EC1M Briset Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Britton Street, EC1M Britton Street was named after Thomas Britten, a 17th century coalman.
Brooke Street, EC1N Brooke Street runs north off of Holborn.
Carey Street, WC2A Carey Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Chancery Lane, WC2A Chancery Lane has formed the western boundary of the City of London since 1994, having previously been divided between the London boroughs of Westminster and Camden.
Charterhouse Street, EC1A Charterhouse Street is a street on the northern boundary of the City of London.
Chichester Rents, WC2A Chichester Rents is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Clare Market, WC2A Clare Market is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Cliffords Inn Passage, EC4Y Cliffords Inn Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Cliffords Inn, EC4A Cliffords Inn is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Cockpit Yard, WC1X Cockpit Yard leads off Northington Street.
Cowcross Street, EC1M Cowcross Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Crane Court, EC4Y Crane Court lay beside the Two Crane Inn Tavern.
Cursitor Street, EC4A Cursitor Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Dane Street, WC1R Dane Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Dombey Street, WC1N Dombey Street is a road in the WC1N postcode area
Dyer’s Buildings, EC1N This is a street in the EC1N postcode area
Eagle Street, WC1R Eagle Street runs parallel to High Holborn, one block north.
East Harding Street, EC4A This is a street in the EC4A postcode area
Eldons Passage, EC1N A street within the EC1N postcode
Ely Court, EC1N Ely Court is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Ely Place, EC1N Ely Place is a gated road at the southern tip of the London Borough of Camden.
Emerald Street, WC1N Emerald Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Farringdon Road, EC1A Farringdon Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Farringdon Road, EC4A Farringdon Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Farringdon Street, EC1A The building of Farringdon Street is considered one of the greatest urban engineering achievements of the 19th century.
Farringdon Street, EC4M Farringdon Street was constructed over the Fleet river.
Fetter Lane, EC4A Fetter Lane is corrupted from ’Fautre’ which was the name for a spear rest - spears were made close by.
Field Court, WC1R Field Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Fleet Street, EC4A Fleet Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Fleet Street, EC4Y Fleet Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Fulwood Place, WC1R Fulwood Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1V postal area.
Furnival Street, EC4A Furnival Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Gate Street, WC2A Gate Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Gough Square, EC4A Gough Square is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Gravel Street, EC1N Gravel Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Grays Inn Place, WC1R Grays Inn Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Grays Inn Square Chambers, WC1R Grays Inn Square Chambers is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Grays Inn Square, WC1R Grays Inn Square is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Great James Street, WC1N Great James Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Great New Street, EC4A Great New Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Great Turnstile, WC1V This is a street in the WC1V postcode area
Greville Street, EC1N Greville Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Gunpowder Square, EC4A Gunpowder Square is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Hand Court, WC1R Hand Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1V postal area.
Hardwicke Building, WC2A Hardwicke Building is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Hare Place, EC4Y Hare Place is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Hat and Mitre Court, EC4Y Hat and Mitre Court is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Hatton Garden, EC1N Hatton Garden is a street and area noted as London’s jewellery quarter and centre of the UK diamond trade.
Hatton Place, EC1N Hatton Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Hatton Square, EC1N Hatton Square is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Hatton Wall, EC1N Hatton Wall is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
High Holborn, WC1V High Holborn was part of the old road from Newgate and the Tower to the gallows at Tyburn.
Hind Court, EC4Y Hind Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Holborn Circus, EC1N Holborn Circus is a junction of five highways in the City of London, on the boundary between Holborn, Hatton Garden and Smithfield.
Holborn Viaduct, EC1A Holborn Viaduct is a road bridge in London and the name of the street which crosses it.
Holborn, EC1N Holborn commemorates the River Fleet, also known as the Holbourne stream.
Hood Court, EC4Y Hood Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Houghton Street, WC2A Houghton Street is a street which has been ’demoted’ over time.
Jockeys Fields, WC1R Jockeys Fields is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Kings Mews, WC1X Kings Mews is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Kingsway, WC2A Kingsway is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Kingsway, WC2B This is a street in the WC2A postcode area
Kirby Street, EC1N Kirby Street was named for Christopher Hatton’s Kirby House in Northamptonshire.
Lamb’s Conduit Passage, WC1R This is a street in the WC1R postcode area
Leather Lane, EC1N Leather Lane is a street one block west of Hatton Garden, in the Holborn area of London.
Limeburner Lane, EC4M Limeburner Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Lincoln’s Inn Fields, WC2A Lincoln’s Inn Fields is the largest public square in London, laid out in the 1630s under the initiative of the speculative builder William Newton.
Little New Street, EC4A Little New Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Little Turnstile, WC2A Little Turnstile is one of the streets of London in the WC1V postal area.
London Central Markets, EC4A London Central Markets is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
London Silver Vaults, WC1V London Silver Vaults is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Ludgate Circus, EC4M Ludgate Circus is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
New Fetter Lane, EC1N New Fetter Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
New Fetter Lane, EC4A New Fetter Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
New House, EC1N Residential block
New Square Passage, WC2A This is a street in the WC2A postcode area
New Square, WC2A New Square is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
New Street Square, EC4A New Street Square is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Norwich Street, EC4A Norwich Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Old Buildings, WC2A Old Buildings is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Old Seacoal Lane, EC4M Old Seacoal Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Old Square, WC2A Old Square is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Orde Hall Street, WC1N Orde Hall Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Pemberton Row, EC4A Sir James Pemberton was Lord Mayor of London in 1611, and a member of the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths.
Pleydell Street, EC4Y Pleydell Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Plough Place, EC4A Plough Place is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Ploughs Place, EC4A Ploughs Place is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Plumtree Court, EC4A Plumtree Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Poppins Court, EC4A Poppins Court is an historic alley off Fleet Street.
Portpool Lane, EC1N Portpool Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Portsmouth Street, WC2A Portsmouth Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Portugal Street, WC2A Portugal Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Princeton Street, WC1R Princeton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Quality Court, WC2A Quality Court is a courtyard, built around 1700.
Raymond Buildings, WC1R Raymond Buildings is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Red Lion Court, EC4A Red Lion Court forms part of labyrinth of little passages behind the shops on the north side of Fleet Street.
Red Lion Square, WC1R Red Lion Square was built from the late 1680s by speculator Nicholas Barbon.
Red Lion Street, WC1R Red Lion Street connects High Holborn with Theobalds Road.
Regent Square, WC1N Regent Square is a road in the WC1N postcode area
Richbell Place, WC1N Richbell Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Rolls Buildings, EC4A Rolls Buildings is a road in the WC2A postcode area
Rolls Passage, WC2A Rolls Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Saffron Hill, EC1N Saffron Hill’s name derives the time that it was part of an estate on which saffron grew.
Sandland Street, WC1R Sandland Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Sardinia House, WC2A Residential block
Sardinia Street, WC2A Sardinia Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Sardinia Street, WC2B Sardinia Street, formerly Duke Street, was a street that ran from Prince’s Street in the south to the western side of Lincoln’s Inn Fields in the north.
Serle Street, WC2A Serle Street is a road in the WC2A postcode area
Sheffield Street, WC2A Sheffield Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Shoe Lane, EC4A Shoe Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Silver Vaults, WC1V Silver Vaults is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Smithfield Street, EC1A Smithfield Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Snow Hill, EC1A Snow Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
South Square, WC1X South Square is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Southampton Buildings, WC2A Southampton Buildings marks the site of the house of the 4th Earl of Southampton, son of Shakespeare’s patron.
St Andrew Street, EC4A St Andrew Street is the northern extension of Shoe Lane.
St Bride Street, EC4A St Bride Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
St Brides Avenue, EC4Y St Brides Avenue is a narrow alley which leaves Fleet Street almost opposite Shoe Lane.
St Clement’s Passage, WC2A St Clement’s Passage is a road in the WC2A postcode area
St Clements Lane, WC2A St Clements Lane is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
St Cross Street, EC1N St Cross Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
St. Bride Street, EC4A A street within the EC4A postcode
Staple Inn Buildings North, WC1X Staple Inn Buildings North is one of the streets of London in the WC1V postal area.
Staple Inn Buildings, WC1V Staple Inn Buildings is part of historic Staple Inn.
Staple Inn Buildings, WC1X Staple Inn Buildings is one of the streets of London in the WC1V postal area.
Star Yard, WC2A Star Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Stone Buildings, WC2A Stone Buildings is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Stonecutter Street, EC4A Stonecutter Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Theobald’s Road, WC1N Theobald’s Road is a road in the WC1R postcode area
Theobalds Road, WC1N Theobalds Road is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Took’s Court, EC4A Took’s Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Turnmill Street, EC1 Turnmill Street appears in the works of Shakespeare.
Verulam Buildings, WC1R Verulam Buildings is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Verulam Street, WC1X Verulam Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Warwick Court, WC1R Warwick Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Waterhouse Square, EC1N Waterhouse Square is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Whetstone Park, WC2A Whetstone Park is a road in the WC2A postcode area
Wine Office Court, EC4A Wine Office Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Yorkshire Grey Yard, WC1V Yorkshire Grey Yard lies off of Eagle Street, WC1

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The Crown and Sugar Loaf This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Dolphin This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Draft House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Enterprise This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fable This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Griffin This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hack & Hop This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hon. Soc. Of Gray’s Inn This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hoop & Grapes This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Bell Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Nick This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Red Lion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The One Tun This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Polish Bar (Na Zdrowie) This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Rugby Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Seven Stars This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Ship Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Square Pig This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The White Swan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Yorkshire Grey This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Tipperary This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ye Olde Mitre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


City of London

The City of London constituted most of London from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages, but the conurbation has since grown far beyond its borders.

As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis of Greater London, though it remains a notable part of central London. It holds city status in its own right and is also a separate ceremonial county.

It is widely referred to as 'The City' (often written on maps as City and differentiated from the phrase 'the city of London') or 'the Square Mile' as it is 1.12 square miles in area. These terms are also often used as metonyms for the United Kingdom's financial services industry, which continues a notable history of being largely based in the City.

The local authority for the City, the City of London Corporation, is unique in the UK and has some unusual responsibilities for a local council, such as being the police authority. It also has responsibilities and ownerships beyond the City's boundaries. The Corporation is headed by the Lord Mayor of the City of London, an office separate from (and much older than) the Mayor of London.

The City is a major business and financial centre, ranking as the world's leading centre of global finance. Throughout the 19th century, the City was the world's primary business centre, and continues to be a major meeting point for businesses.

The City had a resident population of about 7000 in 2011 but over 300,000 people commute to it and work there, mainly in the financial services sector. The legal profession forms a major component of the northern and western sides of the City - especially in the Temple and Chancery Lane areas where the Inns of Court are located, of which two—Inner Temple and Middle Temple - fall within the City of London boundary.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Smithfield Market
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Waterloo Bridge on an 1810 map.
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Amen Court, EC4M
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Farringdon Street, EC4M
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Kirby Street sign
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In the neighbourhood...

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The old wooden Temple Bar
Credit: Walter Thornbury
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Illustration of Fleet Market
Credit: William Henry Prior
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Mount Pleasant Sorting Office on the north-east corner of Farringdon Road (1910). The present building is on the site of the Coldbath Fields Prison where the punishments were particularly cruel in that they were not only long and physically hard but also pointless. The pub at the back used to open at 9am to serve postal workers.
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William Davenant had Lisle
Credit: Henry Herringman, London, 1673
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At the southern end of Carmelite Street in the City of London stood the Victorian-era Whitefriars Fire Station.
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Clerkenwell Green (1898) The water fountain shown here became public toilets.
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Coldbath Square in Clerkenwell was named after a cold water well that stood originally in fields. Cold Bath was fed by a spring which was discovered by a Mr Baynes in 1697. The discoverer declared the water had great power in nervous diseases, and "equalled those of St Magnus and St Winnifred". The bathing hours were from 5am to 1pm, the charge two shillings. The old bathhouse was a building with three gables, and had a large garden with four turret summer houses. In 1811 the trustees of the London Fever Hospital bought the property for £3830, but, being driven away by the frightened inhabitants, the ground was sold for building, the bath remaining as late as 1865.
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Doughty Street is a broad tree lined street in the Holborn district.
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Farringdon Road and the Metropolitan Railway, 1868. Looking north from Turnmill Street
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Farringdon Street, EC4M
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