Petticoat Lane Market

Chinese medicine in/near Queen’s Park, existing between 1608 and now

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2018

Petticoat Lane Market is a fashion and clothing market in the East End.

It consists of two adjacent street markets. Wentworth Street Market is open six days a week and Middlesex Street Market is open on Sunday only.

It is one of a number of traditional markets located to the east of the City of London. A few hundred yards to the north is Old Spitalfields Market, which has been refurbished, and across Commercial Street, to the east, lies Brick Lane Market. A half mile further east is the Columbia Road Flower Market. Petticoat Lane Market was not formally recognised until an Act of Parliament in 1936, but its long history as an informal market makes it possibly one of the oldest surviving markets in Britain.

The name Petticoat Lane came from not only the sale of petticoats but from the fable that "they would steal your petticoat at one end of the market and sell it back to you at the other."

In Tudor times, Middlesex Street was known as Hogs Lane, a pleasant lane lined by hedgerows and elms. It is thought city bakers were allowed to keep pigs in the lane, outside the city wall; or possibly that it was an ancient droving trail. The lane’s rural nature changed, and by 1590, country cottages stood by the city walls. By 1608, it had become a commercial district where second-hand clothes and bric-à-brac were sold and exchanged, known as ’Peticote Lane’. This was also where the Spanish ambassador had his house, and the area attracted many Spaniards from the reign of James I. Peticote Lane was severely affected by the Great Plague of 1665; the rich fled, and London lost a fifth of its population.

Huguenots fleeing persecution arrived in the late 17th century; many settled in the area, and master weavers settled in the new town of Spitalfields. The area already had an association with clothing, with dyeing a local industry. The cloth was pegged out on hooks in the surrounding fields. These were known as tentergrounds. From the mid-18th century, Petticoat Lane became a centre for manufacturing clothes. The market served the well-to-do in the City, selling new garments.

About 1830, Peticote Lane’s name changed to Middlesex Street, to record the boundary between Portsoken Ward, in the City of London, and Whitechapel, which coincided with the Lane. But the old name continues to be associated with the area.

From 1882, a wave of Jewish immigrants fleeing persecution in eastern Europe settled in the area. The chapels, which had previously served the Huguenot community, were adapted as synagogues. Many Jewish relief societies were founded to aid the poor. Jewish immigrants entered the local garment industry and maintained the traditions of the market. The severe damage inflicted throughout the East End during the Blitz and later bombing in World War II served to disperse the Jewish communities to new areas. The area around Middlesex Street suffered a decline. The market continued to prosper. Beginning in the 1970s, a new wave of immigration from India and east Asia restored the area’s vitality - centred on nearby Brick Lane.

In previous times the market was unpopular with the authorities, as it was largely unregulated and in some sense illegal. As recently as the 1930s, police cars and fire engines were driven down The Lane, with alarm bells ringing, to disrupt the market. The rights of the market were finally protected by Act of Parliament in 1936. As late as the 1990s, if Christmas Day fell on a Sunday (which in that decade only occurred in 1994), many of the local Jewish traders would still assert their right to open on a Sunday. ’The Lane’ was always renowned for the ’patter’ and showmanship of the market traders. Some, selling crockery, would pile an entire setting onto a large plate, and then send the lot, high into the air. Catching the construction on its way down was to demonstrate the skill of the vendor, and the robustness of the porcelain.

A prominent businessman, Alan Sugar, got his start as a stall holder in the market. The market remains busy and vibrant, reflecting both its immigrant history and its continuing popularity with locals and tourists.


Main source: Wikipedia
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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Comment
Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Comment
Marion James   
Added: 12 Mar 2021 17:43 GMT   

26 Edith Street Haggerston
On Monday 11th October 1880 Charlotte Alice Haynes was born at 26 Edith Street Haggerston the home address of her parents her father Francis Haynes a Gilder by trade and her mother Charlotte Alice Haynes and her two older siblings Francis & George who all welcomed the new born baby girl into the world as they lived in part of the small Victorian terraced house which was shared by another family had an outlook view onto the world of the Imperial Gas Works site - a very grey drab reality of the life they were living as an East End working class family - 26 Edith Street no longer stands in 2021 - the small rundown polluted terrace houses of Edith Street are long since gone along with the Gas Companies buildings to be replaced with green open parkland that is popular in 21st century by the trendy residents of today - Charlotte Alice Haynes (1880-1973) is the wife of my Great Grand Uncle Henry Pickett (1878-1930) As I research my family history I slowly begin to understand the life my descendants had to live and the hardships that they went through to survive - London is my home and there are many areas of this great city I find many of my descendants living working and dying in - I am yet to find the golden chalice! But in all truthfulness my family history is so much more than hobby its an understanding of who I am as I gather their stories. Did Charlotte Alice Pickett nee Haynes go on to live a wonderful life - no I do not think so as she became a widow in 1930 worked in a canteen and never remarried living her life in and around Haggerston & Hackney until her death in 1973 with her final resting place at Manor Park Cemetery - I think Charlotte most likely excepted her lot in life like many women from her day, having been born in the Victorian era where the woman had less choice and standing in society, which is a sad state of affairs - So I will endeavour to write about Charlotte and the many other women in my family history to give them the voice of a life they so richly deserve to be recorded !

Edith Street was well situated for the new public transport of two railway stations in 1880 :- Haggerston Railway Station opened in 1867 & Cambridge Heath Railway Station opened in 1872


Reply
Lived here
Linda    
Added: 18 Feb 2021 22:03 GMT   

Pereira Street, E1
My grandfather Charles Suett lived in Periera Street & married a widowed neighbour there. They later moved to 33 Bullen House, Collingwood Street where my father was born.

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Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
roger morris   
Added: 16 Oct 2021 08:50 GMT   

Atherton Road, IG5 (1958 - 1980)
I moved to Atherton road in 1958 until 1980 from Finsbury Park. My father purchased the house from his brother Sydney Morris. My father continued to live there until his death in 1997, my mother having died in 1988.
I attended The Glade Primary School in Atherton Road from sept 1958 until 1964 when I went to Beal School. Have fond memories of the area and friends who lived at no2 (Michael Clark)and no11 (Brian Skelly)

Reply
Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

Reply
Comment
Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

Reply
Comment
Simon Chalton   
Added: 10 Oct 2021 21:52 GMT   

Duppas Hill Terrace 1963- 74
I’m 62 yrs old now but between the years 1963 and 1975 I lived at number 23 Duppas Hill Terrace. I had an absolutely idyllic childhood there and it broke my heart when the council ordered us out of our home to build the Ellis Davd flats there.The very large house overlooked the fire station and we used to watch them practice putting out fires in the blue tower which I believe is still there.
I’m asking for your help because I cannot find anything on the internet or anywhere else (pictures, history of the house, who lived there) and I have been searching for many, many years now.
Have you any idea where I might find any specific details or photos of Duppas Hill Terrace, number 23 and down the hill to where the subway was built. To this day it saddens me to know they knocked down this house, my extended family lived at the next house down which I think was number 25 and my best school friend John Childs the next and last house down at number 27.
I miss those years so terribly and to coin a quote it seems they just disappeared like "tears in rain".
Please, if you know of anywhere that might be able to help me in any way possible, would you be kind enough to get back to me. I would be eternally grateful.
With the greatest of hope and thanks,
Simon Harlow-Chalton.


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Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

Reply
Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

Reply
Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
190 Bishopsgate A 1912 view of the City.
29 Aldgate High Street 29 Aldgate High Street is a demolished property, originally on the north side of Aldgate High Street..
46 Aldgate High Street This Grade II Listed office building is one of the few timber-framed buildings in the City that predates the Great Fire of 1666.
Aldgate Aldgate was one of the massive gates which defended the City from Roman times until 1760.
Bevis Marks Synagogue Bevis Marks Synagogue is the oldest synagogue in the United Kingdom.
Boar’s Head Theatre The Boar’s Head Theatre was an inn-yard theatre in the Whitechapel area.
Great Synagogue of London The Great Synagogue of London was, for centuries, the centre of Ashkenazi synagogue and Jewish life in London. It was destroyed during World War II, in the Blitz.
Petticoat Lane Market Petticoat Lane Market is a fashion and clothing market in the East End.
Portsoken Portsoken is one of 25 wards in the City of London, each electing an alderman to the Court of Aldermen and commoners (the City equivalent of a councillor) elected to the Court of Common Council of the City of London Corporation.
St Augustine Papey St Augustine Papey was a mediaeval church in the City of London situated just south of London Wall.
St Botolph’s St. Botolph’s without Aldgate, located on Aldgate High Street, has existed for over a thousand years.
St George’s German Lutheran Church St George’s German Lutheran Church is a church in Alie Street, Whitechapel.
St Mary Axe St Mary Axe was a mediaeval church situated just north of Leadenhall Street on a site now occupied by Fitzwilliam House.
St. Mary Axe St Mary Axe was a medieval parish in the City of London whose name survives as that of the street which formerly occupied it.
Tenter Ground Tenter Ground harks back to the seventeenth century when this patch of land was surrounded by weavers’ houses and workshops and used to wash and stretch their fabrics on ’tenters’ to dry.
Toynbee Hall Toynbee Hall is a building which is the home of a charity of the same name.
Wentworth Street Turn-of-the-century fashion in east London.
Whitechapel Gallery The Whitechapel Gallery is a public art gallery in Aldgate.

NEARBY STREETS
100 Bishopsgate, EC2M 100 Bishopsgate is a development of two mixed-use buildings on Bishopsgate in London.
99 Bishopsgate, EC2N 99 Bishopsgate is a commercial skyscraper located on Bishopsgate, a major thoroughfare in the City of London financial district.
Acorn Street, EC2M Acorn Street, Bishopsgate, was named from an old tavern sign.
Adams Court, EC2N Adam’s Court is thought to be named for Sir Thomas Adams.
Aldermans Walk, EC2M Alderman’s Walk was formerly Dashwood’s Walk, for Francis Dashwood, who lived here in the 18th century.
Aldgate House, EC3N A street within the EC3N postcode
Aldgate Square, EC3N Aldgate Square is a location in London.
Angel Alley, E1 Angel Alley was a narrow passage which ran north-south from Wentworth Street to Whitechapel High Street..
Appold Street, EC2A Appold Street runs north-south on the City of London side of Liverpool Street station.
Arcadia Court, E1 Arcadia Court is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Artillery Lane, E1 The name Artillery Lane remembers the skills of the operators of the longbow.
Artillery Passage, E1 Artillery Passage dates from its time as part of The Old Artillery Ground.
Artizan Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Arts Quarter, E1 Arts Quarter is a road in the E1 postcode area
Austin Friars, EC2N Austin Friars was an Augustinian friary from its foundation in the 1260s, until its dissolution in 1538.
Bell Lane, E1 Bell Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Bells Alley, EC2N Bells Alley is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Bevis Marks, EC3A Bevis Marks is a short street in the ward of Aldgate in the City of London.
Bishopgate, EC2M Bishopgate is location of London.
Bishops Square, E1 Bishops Square is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Bishopsgate Arcade, EC2M Bishopsgate Arcade is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Bishopsgate Churchyard, EC2M Bishopsgate Churchyard is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Bishopsgate, EC2M Bishopsgate was originally the entry point for travellers coming from the north east into London.
Bishopsgate, EC2N Bishopsgate is named after one of the original eight gates in the London Wall.
Blomfield Street, EC2M Blomfield Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Blossom Street, E1 Blossom Street runs from Fleur De Lis Street to Folgate Street.
Braham Street, E1 Braham Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Brick Lane, E1 Brick Lane runs north from the junction of Osborn Street, Old Montague Street and Wentworth Street, through Spitalfields to Bethnal Green Road.
Broad Street Place, EC2M Broad Street Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Broadgate Circle, EC2M Broadgate Circle is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Broadgate, EC2M Broadgate is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Brody House, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Browns Lane, E1 Browns Lane is marked on the 1862 Stanford map.
Brune House, E1 Residential block
Brune Street, E1 Brune Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Brushfield Street, E1 Brushfield Street is a thoroughfare running east-west from Commercial Street to Bishopsgate.
Buckle Street, E1 Buckle Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Bury Street, EC3A Bury Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
Calvin Street, E1 Calvin Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Camomile Street, EC3A Camomile Street is a short street in the City of London
Camperdown Street, E1 Camperdown Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Cavendish Court, EC3A Cavendish Court is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
Celia Blairman House, E1 Residential block
Christopher Street, EC2A Christopher Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Circle Place, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Clothier Street, EC3A A street within the E1, postcode
Cobb Street, E1 Cobb Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
College East, E1 College East is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Commercial Street, E1 Commercial Street is a major thoroughfare running north-south from Shoreditch High Street to Whitechapel High Street.
Coney Way, E1 Coney Way is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Coppergate House, E1 Residential block
Corbet Place, E1 Corbet Place is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Crinoline Mews, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Crispin Place, E1 Crispin Place is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Crispin Street, E1 Crispin Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Crosby Square, EC3A Crosby Square is a location in London.
Crown Place, EC2A Crown Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Cutler Street, E1 Cutler Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
Cutler Street, EC3A Cutler Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Cutlers Gardens Arcade, EC2M Cutlers Gardens Arcade is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Denning Point 33 Commercial Street, E1 A block within the E1 postcode
Devonshire Row, EC2M Devonshire Row is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Devonshire Square, E1 Devonshire Square lies at the end of Devonshire Row.
Dorset Street, E1 Dorset Street was a small thoroughfare running east-west from Crispin Street to Commercial Street.
Dray Walk, E1 Dray Walk is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Dukes Place, EC3A Duke’s Place was formerly called Duke Street.
Dukes Place, EC3A Dukes Place is a road in the EC3N postcode area
Duval Square, E1 Duval Square is a location in London.
Earl Street, EC2A Earl Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Elder Street, E1 Elder Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Eldon Street, EC2M Eldon Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Exchange Arcade, EC2A Exchange Arcade is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Exchange Place, EC2M Exchange Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Exchange Square, EC2A Exchange Square is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Exchange Square, EC2A Exchange Square is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Fashion Street, E1 Fashion Street is a thoroughfare running east-west from Brick Lane to Commercial Street.
Fen Court, EC3M Fen Court is a location in London.
Finsbury Avenue, EC2M Finsbury Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Finsbury Circus, EC2M Finsbury Circus is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Finsbury Square, EC2A Finsbury Square is a 0.7-hectare square in central London which includes a six-rink grass bowling green.
Fleur De Lis Street, E1 Fleur De Lis Street runs west from Commercial Street.
Flower & Dean Walk, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Flower and Dean Street, E1 Flower and Dean Street was a narrow street running east-west from Commercial Street to Brick Lane.
Folgate Street, E1 Folgate Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Fournier Street, E1 Fournier Street is a street running east-west from Brick Lane to Commercial Street alongside Christ Church.
Frostic Walk, E1 Frostic Walk leads from Chicksand Street to Old Montague Street.
Frying Pan Alley, E1 Frying Pan Alley is situated close to Middlesex Street and its Petticoat Lane market.
George Street, E1 George Street was a street running north-south from Flower and Dean Street to Wentworth Street, crossing Thrawl Street approx. half way along its length..
Goring Street, EC3A Goring Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
Goulston Street, E1 Goulston Street is a thoroughfare running north-south from Wentworth Street to Whitechapel High Street.
Gravel Lane, E1 Gravel Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Great St Helen’s, EC3A This is a street in the EC3A postcode area
Great Winchester Street, EC2N Great Winchester Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Gun Street, E1 Gun Street was part of the Old Artillery Ground - land formerly designated one of the Liberties of the Tower of London.
Gunthorpe Street, E1 Gunthorpe Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Hanbury Hall, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Harrow Place, E1 Harrow Place is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Heneage Lane, EC3A Heneage Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
Hopetown Street, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Horner Square, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Houndsditch, EC3A Houndsditch is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
Houndsditch, EC3A A street within the EC3A postcode
Irongate House, EC3A Residential block
Jerome Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Kent and Essex Yard, E1 Kent and Essex Yard ran north of Whitechapel High Street, close to the west side of Commercial Street.
Lamb Street, E1 Lamb Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Leyden Street, E1 Leyden Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Little Paternoster Row, E1 Little Paternoster Row was once known as French Alley.
Liverpool Street, EC2M Liverpool Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Loft House 46a Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Lolesworth Close, E1 Lolesworth Close is a short cul-de-sac on the east side of Commercial Street which was originally the western extremity of Flower and Dean Street.
Lomax Cocoon, EC2A A street within the EC2A postcode
London Fruit Exchange, E1 London Fruit Exchange is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
London Wall Buildings, EC2M London Wall Buildings are a commercial development.
London Wall, EC2M London Wall is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Market Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Middlesex Street, E1 Middlesex Street is home to the Petticoat Lane Market.
Middlesex Street, EC3A Middlesex Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
Minsters Pavement, EC3A Minsters Pavement is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
Mitre Avenue, EC3A Mitre Avenue is one of the streets of London in the E17 postal area.
Monmouth House, E1 Residential block
Nantes Passage, E1 Nantes Passage (also Church Passage) was built for Huguenot weavers.
Nathaniel Close, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
New Broad Street House, EC2M A block within the EC2M postcode
New Broad Street, EC2M New Broad Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
New Drum Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
New Goulston Street, E1 New Goulston Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
New Street, EC2M New Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Norton Folgate, EC2M Norton Folgate is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Norton Folgate, EC2M Norton Folgate is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Octagon Arcade, EC2M Octagon Arcade is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Odeon Court, E1 Odeon Court is on Chicksand Street.
Old Broad Street, EC2M Old Broad Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Old Broad Street, EC2N Old Broad Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Old Broad Street, EC2N This is a street in the EC2R postcode area
Old Castle Street, E1 Old Castle Street runs north-south from Wentworth Street to Whitechapel High Street, the southern section of which incorporates the former Castle Alley, murder site of Ripper victim Alice McKenzie.
Old Spitalfields Market, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Osborn Place, E1 Osborn Place appears on maps between 1800 and 1900.
Parliament Court, E1 Parliament Court is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Paxton House, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Pecks Yard, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Petticoat Square, E1 A street within the postcode
Petticoat Tower, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Pindar Street, EC2A Pindar Street is a road in the EC2A postcode area
Plough Yd, E1 Magpie Alley was an old name for the western section of Fleur de Lys Street.
Pomell Way, E1 Pomell Way is a road in the E1 postcode area
Primrose Street, EC2A Primrose Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Primrose Street, EC2A Primrose Street is a location in London.
Princelet Street, E1 Princelet Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Principal Place, EC2A Principal Place is a location in London.
Puma Court, E1 Puma Court is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Resolution Plaza, E1 Resolution Plaza is a location in London.
Rose Court, E1 Rose Court is a road in the E1 postcode area
Sandy’s Row, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Sandys Row, E1 Sandys Row is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Seven Stars Yard, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Snowden Street, EC2A Snowden Street is a road in the EC2A postcode area
Spital Square, E1 Spital Square was started in 1733 - Robert Seymour’s edition of Stow’s Survey of London re marked that "in place of this hospital (St. Mary Spital), ... are now built many handsome houses for merchants and others".
St Botolph Street, EC3A St Botolph Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
St Helen’s Place, EC3A St Helen’s Place runs east from Bishopsgate.
St James’s Place, EC3A St James’s Place was an open square, formerly Broad Court, which held a daily market that sold fruits of various kinds.
St Mary Axe, EC3A St Mary Axe is an ancient street of the City of London.
St. John’s Drive, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
St. Mary’s Grove, EC3A Jeffrey’s Square disappeared under the St Mary Axe development.
Staple Hall, EC3A Staple Hall is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
Stock Exchange Building, EC2N Stock Exchange Building is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Stone House Court, EC3A Stone House Court is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
Stoney Lane, EC3A Stoney Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Stothard Place, E1 Stothard Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Stothard Place, E1 A street within the postcode
Strype Street, E1 John Strype, who became an antiquary, historian and parson was the son of a Huguenot weaver and born here in 1643.
Sun Street Passage, EC2A Sun Street Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Sun Street Passage, EC2M Sun Street Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Sun Street, EC2M Sun Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Tenter Ground, E1 Tenter Ground is one of the notable streets of Spitalfields.
The Arcade, EC2A The Arcade is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
The Broadgate Tower, EC2A A street within the EC2A postcode
The Community Centre, E1 The Community Centre is a location in London.
Thrawl Street, E1 Originally built by Henry Thrall (or Thrale) c.1656, Thrawl Street ran east-west from Brick Lane as far as George Street across a former tenter field owned by the Fossan brothers, Thomas and Lewis.
Threadneedle Street, EC2N Threadneedle Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
Throgmorton Avenue, EC2N Throgmorton Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Toynbee Street, E1 Toynbee Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Tyne Street, E1 Tyne Street is a location in London.
Undershaft, EC3P Undershaft is a road in the EC3P postcode area
Union Court, EC2N Union Court is an alleyway off of Broad Street.
Victoria Avenue, E1 This is a street in the EC2M postcode area
Victoria Yard, E1 Victoria Yard is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Wentworth Street, E1 Wentworth Street runs east-west from the junction of Brick Lane, Osborn Street and Old Montague Street to Middlesex Street, forming part of the boundary between Spitalfields and St Mary’s Whitechapel.
White Kennett Street, EC3A White Kennett Street was named after a Bishop of Peterborough.
Whitechapel High Street, E1 Whitechapel High Street runs approximately west-east from Aldgate High Street to Whitechapel Road and is designated as part of the A11.
Whitecross Place, EC2M Whitecross Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Whites Row, E1 White’s Row is a narrow thoroughfare running east-west from Commercial Street to Crispin Street.
Whittington Avenue, EC3A Whittington Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
Widegate Street, E1 Widegate Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Wilkes Street, E1 Wilkes Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Wilson Street, EC2A Wilson Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Wilson Street, EC2M Wilson Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Wormwood Street, EC2N Wormwood Street refers to the wormwood plant which used to grow on the London Wall and in other areas of wasteland in the City.
Wrestlers Court, EC3A Wrestlers Court is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
All Bar One Appold Street This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
All Bar One Bishopsgate This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Astronomer This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Babble City This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Balls Brothers Austin Friars This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Balls Brothers Wine Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Corney & Barrow This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Crab Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Devonshire Terrace This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Dirty Dicks This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Dirty Martini This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Enoteca This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
George Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hamilton Hall This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Kings Stores This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
La Tasca This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Slug and Lettuce This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Alice This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Arbitrager This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Botanist This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Breakfast Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Drift This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The English Wine and Spirit Co Ltd This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fleetwood This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Flying Horse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hoop & Grapes This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Kings Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Lord Aberconway This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Magpie This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Railway Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Red Lion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Salt Point Bar This is a bar in Liverpool Street station.
The Sterling This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Woodins Shades This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Unknown as yet This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Vertigo 42 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
We Are Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
White Horse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Byward Tower, 1893
TUM image id: 1556882285
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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The Great Synagogue of London (1810)
Credit: Thomas Rowlandson (1756â
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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The Boar’s Head was located on the north side of Whitechapel High Street. The Boar’s Head was originally an inn, which was built in the 1530s; it underwent two renovations for use as a playhouse: first, in 1598, when a simple stage was erected, and a second, more elaborate renovation in 1599.
Credit: Unknown
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The Aldgate Pump in 1874.
Credit: Wellcome Images
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Bevis Marks Synagogue
Credit: John Salmon
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Exterior of St Katherine Cree, City of London
Credit: Prioryman
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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St James Duke
Credit: Robert William Billings and John Le Keux
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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The Third Goodmans Fields Theatre, Great Alie Street, London in 1801 - From
Credit: W. W. Hutchings
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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A drawing published in 1907 of the west front of the Church of Holy Trinity, Minories
Credit: Uncredited
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Etching of All Hallows Staining tower, drawn in 1922
Credit: Public domain
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Mass grave for plague victims, Holywell Mount (1665) Holywell Mount is the source of the River Walbrook. Today it lies underneath Luke Street in Shoreditch but, then in open land, was used as a plague pit in 1665.
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