Lever Street, EC1V

An area which may have existed since the nineteenth century or before- in the area buildings are mainly post-war

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Road · Clerkenwell · EC1V ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Lever Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Reply
Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

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Comment
Jack Wilson   
Added: 21 Jun 2022 21:40 GMT   

Penfold Printers
I am seeking the location of Penfold Printers Offices in Dt Albans place - probably about 1870 or so

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Reply
Erin   
Added: 2 May 2022 01:33 GMT   

Windsor Terrace, N1
hello

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Comment
Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

Reply
Comment
ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

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Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


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Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

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Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Comment
Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Bunhill Fields Bunhill Fields was in use as a burial ground from 1665 until 1854.
St Luke’s Hospital for Lunatics St Luke’s Hospital for Lunatics was founded in London in 1751 for the treatment of incurable pauper lunatics by a group of philanthropists.

NEARBY STREETS
Agdon Street, EC1V Agdon Street was originally called Woods Close.
Alford Place, N1 Alford Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Amias Place, EC1Y Amias Place was formerly George Yard.
Anchor Yard, EC1Y Anchor Yard is named after a former inn here of this name.
Angel Gate, EC1V Angel Gate is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Ashby Street, EC1V Ashby Street was named after local landowners who had a seat at Castle Ashby, Northamptonshire.
Aylesbury Street, EC1V Aylesbury Street - after the earl of Aylesbury who owned a house near here in the 17th century.
Baldwin Street, EC1V Baldwin Street was named after Richard Baldwin, Treasurer at St Bartholomew’s Hospital when the street was built in 1811.
Baltic Street East, EC1Y Baltic Street East was built by a timber merchant around 1810 who named local streets after trade-related activities.
Banner Street, EC1Y Banner Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Bartholomew Square, EC1V This is a street in the EC1V postcode area
Bastwick Street, EC1V Bastwick Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Bath Street, EC1V Bath Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Berry Place, EC1V Berry Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Berry Street, EC1M Berry Street is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Bollinder Place, EC1V Bollinder Place lies along City Road.
Braithwaite House, EC1Y Braithwaite House is a block on Bunhill Row
Brewery Square, EC1V Brewery Square is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Brewhouse Yard, EC1V Brewhouse Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Britannia Walk, N1 Britannia Walk is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Bunhill Fields, EC1Y Bunhill Fields is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
Central Street, EC1V Central Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Chequer Street, EC1Y Chequer Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
City Forum, EC1V City Forum is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
City Road, EC1V City Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Compton Street, EC1V Compton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Coombs Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Crescent Row, EC1Y Crescent Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Custance Street, N1 Custance Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Cyrus Street, EC1V Cyrus Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Dallington Street, EC1V Dallington Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Davina House, EC1V Davina House is a block on Goswell Road
Dingley Road, EC1V Dingley Road is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Domingo Street, EC1Y Domingo Street links Old Street with Baltic Street East.
Dufferin Avenue, EC1Y Dufferin Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Ebenezer Street, EC1V A street within the N1 postcode
Falcon Court, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Farringdon Road, EC1V Farringdon Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Featherstone Street, EC1Y Featherstone Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Friend Street, EC1V Friend Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Galway Street, EC1V Galway Street was named for the Earl of Galway.
Gambier House, EC1V Gambier House is a block on Mora Street
Gard Street, EC1V Gard Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Garrett Street, EC1Y Garrett Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Gee Street, EC1V Gee Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Godfrey House St Lukes Estate, EC1V Godfrey House is on the St Lukes Estate.
Golden Lane, EC1Y Golden Lane connects Old Street and Beech Street.
Goswell Road, EC1V Goswell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Great Sutton Street, EC1M Great Sutton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Grimthorpe House, EC1V Residential block
Hall Street, EC1V Hall Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Haverstock Place, EC1V A street within the N1 postcode
Haverstock Street, EC1V Haverstock Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Haywards Place, EC1V Haywards Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Helmet Row, EC1V Helmet Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Hermit Street, EC1V Hermit Street links Friend Street with Rawstorne Street.
Honduras Street, EC1Y Honduras Street dates from the 1810s.
Ironmonger Row, EC1V Ironmonger Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Jasper Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Jerusalem Passage, EC1M Jerusalem Passage was named for an old public house, St John of Jerusalem, which stood at the northeast corner until 1760.
King Square, EC1V King Square is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Leo Yard, EC1V Leo Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Lizard Street, EC1V Lizard Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Macclesfield Road, EC1V Macclesfield Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Mallow Street, EC1Y Mallow Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Malta Street, EC1V This is a street in the EC1V postcode area
Manningford Close, EC1V Manningford Close is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Martha’s Buildings, EC1Y Martha’s Buildings is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Masons Place, EC1V Masons Place is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Memel Street, EC1Y Memel Street was built over the site of a former brewery in the 1810s.
Micawber Street, N1 Micawber Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Mitchell Street, EC1V Mitchell Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Mora Street, EC1V Mora Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Moreland Street, EC1V Moreland Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Murray Grove, N1 Murray Grove is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Murton Street, EC1V Murton Street dates from about 1829.
Nelson Terrace, EC1V Nelson Terrace is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Nile Street, N1 Nile Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Norman Street, EC1V Norman Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Northampton Square, EC1V Northampton Square is a square between Finsbury and Clerkenwell, located between Goswell Road and St John Street.
Northburgh Street, EC1M Northburgh Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Northburgh Street, EC1M Northburgh Street in the EC1V postcode is a western extension of the main part of the street.
Oakley Crescent, EC1V Oakley Crescent is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Old Street, EC1Y Old Street runs west to east from Goswell Road in Clerkenwell to a crossroads in Shoreditch.
Paget Street, EC1V Paget Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Paper Mill Buildings, EC1V A street within the N1 postcode
Pardon Street, EC1V Pardon Street was named after Pardon Chapel, founded in the wake of the Black Death in 1348.
Paton Street, EC1V Paton Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Pear Tree Street, EC1V Pear Tree Street connects Central Street and Goswell Road.
Peerless Street, EC1V Peerless Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Percival Street, EC1V Percival Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Peregrine House, EC1V Peregrine House is a block on Hall Street
Provost & East Building, Provost & East Building lies within the postcode.
Provost Street, N1 Provost Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Quaker Court, EC1Y Quaker Court is a block on Banner Street
Radnor Street, EC1V Radnor Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Rawstorne Place, EC1V Rawstorne Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Rawstorne Street, EC1V Rawstorne Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Remington Road, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Remington Street, EC1V Remington Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Roscoe Street, EC1Y Roscoe Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Sebastian Street, EC1V Sebastian Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Seward Street, EC1V Seward Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Shepherdess Building, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Shepherdess Place, N1 Shepherdess Place is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Sidney Grove, EC1V Sidney Grove is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Spencer Street, EC1V Spencer Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
St John Street, EC1V St John Street runs from Finsbury to Farringdon.
Sycamore Street, EC1Y Sycamore Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Taplow Street, N1 Taplow Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Thoresby Street, N1 Thoresby Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Tilney Court, EC1Y Tilney Court lies off of Old Street.
Timber Street, EC1Y Timber Street was formerly called Norway Street.
Tompion House, EC1V Tompion House is a block on Cyrus Street
Tompion Street, EC1V Tompion Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Underwood Row, N1 Underwood Row is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Underwood Street, N1 Underwood Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Victoria House, EC1V A street within the EC1V postcode
Wakley Street, EC1V Wakley Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Waterloo Street, EC1V Waterloo Street once ran from Lever Street to Radnor Street.
Wellesley Terrace, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Wenlock Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Westland Place, N1 Westland Place is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Windsor Terrace, N1 Windsor Terrace is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Wyclif Street, EC1V Wyclif Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Wynyatt Street, EC1V Wynyatt Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Young’s Buildings, EC1Y Young’s Buildings was named after Francis Young, a local 18th century property owner

NEARBY PUBS
Artillery Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bavarian Beerhouse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hat and Feathers At the corner of Clerkenwell Road and Goswell Road sits the Hat and Feathers pub.
Love’s Company, Unit 1 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Masque Haunt This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Nomad Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sutton Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Eagle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Fountain This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Ivy House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Peasant This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Slaughtered Lamb This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Trader This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Well This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
William IV This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Clerkenwell

Clerkenwell was once known as London’s Little Italy because of the large number of Italians living in the area from the 1850s until the 1960s.

Clerkenwell took its name from the Clerks’ Well in Farringdon Lane. In the Middle Ages, the London Parish clerks performed annual mystery plays there, based on biblical themes. Part of the well remains visible, incorporated into a 1980s building called Well Court.

In the 17th century South Clerkenwell became a fashionable place of residence. Oliver Cromwell owned a house on Clerkenwell Close, just off the Green. Several aristocrats had houses there, most notably the Duke of Northumberland, as did people such as Erasmus Smith.

Before Clerkenwell became a built-up area, it had a reputation as a resort a short walk out of the city, where Londoners could disport themselves at its spas, of which there were several, based on natural chalybeate springs, tea gardens and theatres. The present day Sadler’s Wells has survived as heir to this tradition.

Clerkenwell was also the location of three prisons: the Clerkenwell Bridewell, Coldbath Fields Prison (later Clerkenwell Gaol) and the New Prison, later the Clerkenwell House of Detention, notorious as the scene of the Clerkenwell Outrage in 1867, an attempted prison break by Fenians who killed many in the tenement houses on Corporation Row in trying to blow a hole in the prison wall.

The Industrial Revolution changed the area greatly. It became a centre for breweries, distilleries and the printing industry. It gained a special reputation for the making of clocks and watches, which activity once employed many people from around the area. Flourishing craft workshops still carry on some of the traditional trades, such as jewellery-making. Clerkenwell is home to Witherby’s, Europe’s oldest printing company.

After the Second World War, Clerkenwell suffered from industrial decline and many of the premises occupied by the engineering, printing publishing and meat and food trades (the last mostly around Smithfield) fell empty. Several acclaimed council housing estates were commissioned by Finsbury Borough Council. Modernist architect and Russian émigré Berthold Lubetkin’s listed Spa Green Estate, constructed 1943–1950, has recently been restored. The Finsbury Estate, constructed in 1968 to the designs of Joseph Emberton includes flats, since altered and re-clad.

A general revival and gentrification process began in the 1980s, and the area is now known for loft-living in some of the former industrial buildings. It also has young professionals, nightclubs and restaurants and is home to many professional offices as an overspill for the nearby City of London and West End.

Amongst other sectors, there is a notable concentration of design professions around Clerkenwell, and supporting industries such as high-end designer furniture showrooms.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Smithfield Market
TUM image id: 1620388545
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St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
TUM image id: 1554045418
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Angel, Islington (c.1890)
TUM image id: 1557162442
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Saint John’s Gate, Clerkenwell, the main gateway to the Priory of Saint John of Jerusalem. The church was founded in the 12th century by Jordan de Briset, a Norman knight. Prior Docwra completed the gatehouse shown in this photograph in 1504. The gateway served as the main entry to the Priory, which was the center of the Order of St John of Jerusalem (the Knights Hospitallers).
Credit: Henry Dixon (1880)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Great Arthur House, at the centre of the Golden Lane Estate, was the tallest residential building in Britain at the time of its construction.
Credit: Steve F/Wiki commons
Licence: CC BY 2.0


At the corner of Clerkenwell Road and Goswell Road sits the Hat and Feathers. It was built on the site of an earlier tavern around 1860 for owner James Leask. It was designed by William Finch Hill who specialised in music halls and pubs.
Credit: Ewan Munro
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Pardon Street
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Albion Place in 1902, looking east towards the Old Baptist’s Head public house and No. 31 St John’s Lane, Clerkenwell
Licence:


Berkley Court, Clerkenwell as photographed by HW Fincham on 7 July 1899.
Credit: HW Fincham
Licence:


Royal Oak, Waterloo Street in the early 1960s. Waterloo Street once ran from Lever Street to Radnor Street. The original street dates from around 1829 and like other streets of similar name, commemorates Wellington’s 1815 victory. The whole area was redeveloped for the Pleydell Estate in 1965.
Credit: James Wyatt
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