Ropemaker Street, EC2M

Road in/near Moorgate

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(51.5196 -0.08872, 51.519 -0.088) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · Moorgate · EC2M ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Ropemaker Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

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Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

Reply

Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Comment
Marion James   
Added: 12 Mar 2021 17:43 GMT   

26 Edith Street Haggerston
On Monday 11th October 1880 Charlotte Alice Haynes was born at 26 Edith Street Haggerston the home address of her parents her father Francis Haynes a Gilder by trade and her mother Charlotte Alice Haynes and her two older siblings Francis & George who all welcomed the new born baby girl into the world as they lived in part of the small Victorian terraced house which was shared by another family had an outlook view onto the world of the Imperial Gas Works site - a very grey drab reality of the life they were living as an East End working class family - 26 Edith Street no longer stands in 2021 - the small rundown polluted terrace houses of Edith Street are long since gone along with the Gas Companies buildings to be replaced with green open parkland that is popular in 21st century by the trendy residents of today - Charlotte Alice Haynes (1880-1973) is the wife of my Great Grand Uncle Henry Pickett (1878-1930) As I research my family history I slowly begin to understand the life my descendants had to live and the hardships that they went through to survive - London is my home and there are many areas of this great city I find many of my descendants living working and dying in - I am yet to find the golden chalice! But in all truthfulness my family history is so much more than hobby its an understanding of who I am as I gather their stories. Did Charlotte Alice Pickett nee Haynes go on to live a wonderful life - no I do not think so as she became a widow in 1930 worked in a canteen and never remarried living her life in and around Haggerston & Hackney until her death in 1973 with her final resting place at Manor Park Cemetery - I think Charlotte most likely excepted her lot in life like many women from her day, having been born in the Victorian era where the woman had less choice and standing in society, which is a sad state of affairs - So I will endeavour to write about Charlotte and the many other women in my family history to give them the voice of a life they so richly deserve to be recorded !

Edith Street was well situated for the new public transport of two railway stations in 1880 :- Haggerston Railway Station opened in 1867 & Cambridge Heath Railway Station opened in 1872


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Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

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Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

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Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
Lived here
David James Bloomfield   
Added: 13 Jul 2021 11:54 GMT   

Hurstway Street, W10
Jimmy Bloomfield who played for Arsenal in the 1950s was brought up on this street. He was a QPR supporter as a child, as many locals would be at the time, as a teen he was rejected by them as being too small. They’d made a mistake

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Comment
Added: 6 Jul 2021 05:38 GMT   

Wren Road in the 1950s and 60s
Living in Grove Lane I knew Wren Road; my grandfather’s bank, Lloyds, was on the corner; the Scout District had their office in the Congregational Church and the entrance to the back of the Police station with the stables and horses was off it. Now very changed - smile.

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fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

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Lived here
Kim Johnson   
Added: 24 Jun 2021 19:17 GMT   

Limehouse Causeway (1908)
My great grandparents were the first to live in 15 Tomlins Terrace, then my grandparents and parents after marriage. I spent the first two years of my life there. My nan and her family lived at number 13 Tomlins Terrace. My maternal grandmother lived in Maroon house, Blount Street with my uncle. Nan, my mum and her brothers were bombed out three times during the war.

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Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Golden Lane Estate, EC1Y The Golden Lane Housing Estate is a 1950s council housing complex in the City of London.
Honourable Artillery Company Museum The Honourable Artillery Company Museum opened in 1987.
Tenter Ground Tenter Ground harks back to the seventeenth century when this patch of land was surrounded by weavers’ houses and workshops and used to wash and stretch their fabrics on ’tenters’ to dry.

NEARBY STREETS
100 Bishopsgate, EC2M 100 Bishopsgate is a development of two mixed-use buildings on Bishopsgate in London.
99 Bishopsgate, EC2N 99 Bishopsgate is a commercial skyscraper located on Bishopsgate, a major thoroughfare in the City of London financial district.
Aldermanbury Square, EC2V At the centre of Saxon London, the aldermen (elder statesmen of City wards) met in a ’bury’ (house) in a time before the Guildhall was built.
Aldermanbury, EC2V Aldermanbury is the Saxon name for ’Eldermen’ (elder statesmen) and ’bury’ (house).
Aldermans Walk, EC2M Alderman’s Walk was formerly Dashwood’s Walk, for Francis Dashwood, who lived here in the 18th century.
Andrewes Highwalk, EC2Y Andrewes Highwalk is named for Lancelot Andrewes, rector of the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate Church.
Andrewes House, EC2Y Residential block
Appold Street, EC2A Appold Street runs north-south on the City of London side of Liverpool Street station.
Basinghall Avenue, EC2V Basinghall Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Basinghall Street, EC2V Basinghall Street joins Gresham Street to the south.
Bassishaw Highwalk, EC2V Bassishaw Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Bastion Highwalk, EC2Y Bastion Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Beech Street, EC1Y Beech Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Bells Alley, EC2N Bells Alley is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Bishopsgate Churchyard, EC2M Bishopsgate Churchyard is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Blomfield Street, EC2M Blomfield Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Bonhill Street, EC2A Bonhill Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Bornhill Street, EC2A Bornhill Street is a location in London.
Brandon Mews, EC2Y Brandon Mews is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Brewers Hall Gardens, EC2V Brewers Hall Gardens is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Bridgewater Square, EC2Y Bridgewater Square is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Broad Street Place, EC2M Broad Street Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Broadgate Circle, EC2M Broadgate Circle is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Broadgate, EC2M Broadgate is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Bryer Court, EC2Y Bryer Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Bunhill Row, EC1Y Bunhill Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Chequer Street, EC1Y Chequer Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Cherry Tree Walk, EC1Y Cherry Tree Walk is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
Chiswell Street, EC2Y Chiswell Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Chiswell Street, SE5 Chiswell Street is a location in London.
Christopher Street, EC2A Christopher Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Clifton Street, EC2A Clifton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Coleman Street, EC2V Coleman Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Compter Passage, EC2V Compter Passage is a location in London.
Copthall Avenue Drapers Gardens, EC2N Drapers Gardens is a block in Copthall Avenue.
Copthall Avenue, EC2N Copthall Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Copthall Avenue, EC2R Copthall Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
Cripplegate Street, EC1Y Cripplegate Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Crown Place, EC2A Crown Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Cutlers Gardens Arcade, EC2M Cutlers Gardens Arcade is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Defoe House, EC2Y Residential block
Dominion Street, EC2M Dominion Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Dufferin Avenue, EC1Y Dufferin Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Dufferin Street, EC1Y Dufferin Street runs between Bunhill Row and Whitecross Street.
Earl Street, EC2A Earl Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
East Market, EC2Y East Market is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Eldon Street, EC2M Eldon Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Epworth Street, EC2A Epworth Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Errol Street, EC1Y Errol Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Exchange Place, EC2M Exchange Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Exchange Square, EC2A Exchange Square is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Fann Street, EC1Y Fann Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Ferroners House, EC2Y Ferroners House
Finsbury Avenue, EC2M Finsbury Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Finsbury Circus Gardens, EC2M Finsbury Circus Gardens is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Finsbury Circus, EC2M Finsbury Circus is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Finsbury Court, EC2A Finsbury Court was obliterated in a redevelopment programme taking in Finsbury Pavement.
Finsbury Pavement, EC2M Finsbury Pavement was the first pavement of firm ground north of the marshy Moorfields.
Finsbury Square, EC2A Finsbury Square is a 0.7-hectare square in central London which includes a six-rink grass bowling green.
Finsbury Street, EC2A Finsbury Street is a road in the EC2Y postcode area
Fore Street Avenue, EC2Y Fore Street Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Fore Street, EC2Y Fore Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Fortune Street, EC1Y Fortune Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Gilbert Bridge, EC2Y Gilbert Bridge is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Gilbert House, EC2Y Residential block
Golden Lane, EC1Y Golden Lane connects Old Street and Beech Street.
Golden Lane, EC2Y Golden Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Great Swan Alley, EC2R Great Swan Alley is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
Great Winchester Street, EC2N Great Winchester Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Guildhall Yard, EC2V Guildhall Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Holywell Row, EC2A Holywell Row is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Honey Lane, EC2V Honey Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Ironmongers Hall Shaftesbury Place, EC2Y Ironmongers Hall Shaftesbury Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Lackington Street, EC2M Lackington Street is a road in the EC2A postcode area
Lamb’s Passage, EC1Y Lamb’s Passage was formerly Great Swordbearers (Sword Bearers) Alley.
Leonard Circus, EC2A Leonard Circus is a location in London.
Liverpool Street, EC2M Liverpool Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Lomax Cocoon, EC2A A street within the EC2A postcode
London Wall Buildings, EC2M London Wall Buildings are a commercial development.
London Wall, EC2M London Wall is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
London Wall, EC2Y London Wall is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
London Wall, EC2Y London Wall is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
Love Lane, EC2V Love Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Mason’s Avenue, EC2V A street within the EC2V postcode
Milton Court, EC2Y Milton Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Milton Street, EC2Y Milton Street was formerly known as Grub Street.
Mitre Court, EC2V Mitre Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Monkwell Square, EC2Y Monkwell Square is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Moorfields Highwalk, EC2Y Moorfields Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Moorfields, EC2Y Moorfields is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Moorgate Hall, EC2M Moorgate Hall is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Moorgate Place, EC2R Moorgate Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
Moorgate, EC2M Moorgate is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Moorgate, EC2R Moorgate is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
New Broad Street House, EC2M A block within the EC2M postcode
New Broad Street, EC2M New Broad Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
New Union Street, EC2Y New Union Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Newgate Street, EC2V Newgate Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Noble Street, EC2V Noble Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Oat Lane, EC2V Oat Lane has been marked on London maps since 1600 and before.
Octagon Arcade, EC2M Octagon Arcade is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Old Broad Street, EC2M Old Broad Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
One Ropemaker Street, EC2Y One Ropemaker Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Pindar Street, EC2A Pindar Street is a road in the EC2A postcode area
Primrose Street, EC2A Primrose Street is a location in London.
Roman House, EC2Y Roman House is a location in London.
Roscoe Street, EC1Y Roscoe Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Salisbury House, EC2M Residential block
Scrutton Street, EC2A Scrutton Street is the eastern extension of Epworth Street.
Seddon Highwalk, EC2Y Seddon Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Silk Street, EC2Y Silk Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Snowden Street, EC2A Snowden Street is a road in the EC2A postcode area
South Place, EC2M South Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
St Alphage Garden, EC2Y St Alphage Garden is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
St Alphage Highwalk, EC2V St Alphage Highwalk is part of the Barbican.
St Ann’s Lane, EC2V St Ann’s Lane was the name for the west end of Gresham Street until the 1860s.
St. Giles Terrace, EC2Y St Giles Terrace lies alongside St Giles Cripplegate church.
Stock Exchange Building, EC2N Stock Exchange Building is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Sun Street Passage, EC2A Sun Street Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Sun Street Passage, EC2M Sun Street Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Sun Street, EC2M Sun Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Telegraph Street, EC2R Telegraph Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
The Postern, EC2Y The Postern is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
The Sutton Estate, EC1Y The Sutton Estate is a road in the N1 postcode area
Thomas More Highwalk, EC2Y Thomas More Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Three Nun Court, EC2V Three Nun Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Throgmorton Avenue, EC2N Throgmorton Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Union Court, EC2N Union Court is an alleyway off of Broad Street.
Vandy Street, EC2A Vandy Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Victoria House, EC2A Victoria House is a location in London.
Wallside, EC2Y Wallside is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Warwick Yard, EC1Y Warwick Yard is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
Whitecross Place, EC2M Whitecross Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Whitecross Street, EC1Y Whitecross Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Willoughby Highwalk, EC2Y Willoughby Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Wilson Street, EC2A Wilson Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Wilson Street, EC2M Wilson Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Wood Street, EC2V Wood Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Wood Street, EC2Y Wood Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Wormwood Street, EC2N Wormwood Street refers to the wormwood plant which used to grow on the London Wall and in other areas of wasteland in the City.
Worship Mews, EC2A Worship Mews is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Worship Street, EC2A Worship Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
All Bar One Appold Street This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
All Bar One Moorgate This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Amber Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Artillery Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Babble City This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Balls Brothers Austin Friars This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Circle Bar, Level 0 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Crab Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Davy’s This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Enoteca This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Fox Fine Wines This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
George Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hamilton Hall This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Honourable Artillery Company This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Jamies This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
La Tasca This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Old Doctor Butler’s Head This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Old Kings Head The Old Kings Head is located at 28 Holywell Row, EC2.
Queen of Hoxton This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sabor Iberico This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Searcys Bars @ GSM & D This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Singer This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Slug and Lettuce This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Botanist This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Drift This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fleetwood This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Flying Horse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Gable This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Globe This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Jugged Hare This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Kings Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Lord Aberconway This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Lord Raglan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Rack & Tenter This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Railway Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Red Lion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Telegraph This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Windmill This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Wood Street Bar and Restaurant This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Moorgate

Moorgate was a postern in the London Wall originally built by the Romans.

It was turned into a gate in the 15th century. Though the gate was demolished in 1762, the name survives as a major street in the City of London. The street connects the City to Islington and Hackney, and was constructed around 1846 as one of the new approaches to London Bridge.

The name Moorgate derives from the surrounding area of Moorfields, which was one of the last pieces of open land in the City. Today this region is a financial centre, and is home to several investment banks. The street also showcases historic and contemporary office buildings.

The earliest descriptions of Moorgate date from the early 15th century. Located between Bishopsgate and Cripplegate and leading to a moor known as Moorfields, it was not one of the larger or more important of the city gates.

When Moorgate was demolished with all the other London city wall gates in 1761/2, the resulting stone was sold for £166 to the City of London Corporation to support the starlings of the newly widened centre arch of the London Bridge.

The Moorfields were one of the last pieces of open land in the City of London. The fields were divided into three areas: the Moorfields proper, just inside the City boundaries, north of Bethlem Royal Hospital (also known as Bedlam, Europe's oldest psychiatric hospital), and Middle and Upper Moorfields (both also open fields) to the north. Much of Moorfields was developed in 1777 and turned into present day Finsbury Circus.

The London Dispensary for curing diseases of the Eye and Ear was founded on the Moorfields in 1805, and evolved to become the present Moorfields Eye Hospital, which is now located on City Road and is close to Old Street station.

Moorfields was the site of the first hydrogen balloon flight in England, when Italian Vincenzo Lunardi took off on the afternoon of 15 September 1784. Lunardi flew in a hydrogen balloon from the area of the Honourable Artillery Company near Moorfields (where it still is to this day, occupying a site next to City Road).

Moorgate is also the birthplace of John Keats, one of the principal poets in the English Romantic movement. Keats was born in 1795 in the Swan and Hoop Inn at 199 Moorgate, where his father was an ostler.

Moorgate station was opened by the Metropolitan Railway in December 1865 when they extended their original route between Paddington and Farringdon.

The Northern line platforms were opened by the City & South London Railway (C&SLR) as Moorgate Street in February 1900 and formed the northern terminus of its services from Stockwell south of the River Thames. The line was extended to Angel the following year.

The Northern City Line to Moorgate was opened by the Great Northern & City Railway in February 1904 offering a service to Finsbury Park. The route was constructed in tube tunnels, but they were constructed at a diameter capable of accommodating main line trains (in contrast to the majority of London tube tunels which are much smaller). However the planned through services to the Great Northern Railway's main line were never implemented, and the route remained a simple short route between Moorgate and Finsbury Park, later cut back to run between Moorgate and Drayton Park only due to Victoria Line construction in the 1960s.

Moorgate station is remembered for the Moorgate tube crash of 1975. In the incident, a train terminating at the station failed to stop and crashed into a brick wall, and 43 people were killed. This resulted in systems being installed on the Underground which automatically stop trains at dead-ends, which have become known as Moorgate control.


LOCAL PHOTOS
St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
TUM image id: 1554045418
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In the neighbourhood...

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"Cheapside and Bow Church" engraved by W. Albutt, 1837 steel engraved print after a picture by T.H. Shepherd, first published in The History of London: Illustrated by Views in London and Westminster.
Credit: W. Albutt
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
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The gravestone of English poet William Blake in Bunhill Fields Burial Ground
Credit: https://careergappers.com/
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Shepherd’s Place archway (c. 1810), and Tenter Street (c. 1820) in 1909
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Shown on many older maps as Dashwood Walk, in the 17th century Alderman’s Walk was a passageway leading to the large house and gardens of Sir Frances Dashwood. The poet John Keats was christened at nearby St Botolph’s church in 1795
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Great Arthur House, at the centre of the Golden Lane Estate, was the tallest residential building in Britain at the time of its construction.
Credit: Steve F/Wiki commons
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Coffee house sign
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A 1950s (or earlier?) City of London street sign from Change Alley, EC3.
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"Cheapside and Bow Church" engraved by W. Albutt, 1837 steel engraved print after a picture by T.H. Shepherd, first published in The History of London: Illustrated by Views in London and Westminster.
Credit: W. Albutt
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

The Bridging Home sculpture by Korean artist Do Ho Suh at the corner of Bishopsgate and Wormwood Street represents migrant history in London. The traditional Korean house is a replica of his childhood home, designed to look as though it has fallen on the bridge.
Credit: https://careergappers.com/
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